Artists' books

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Invited to Stockholm in spring of 2015 to work with the graduating MA and BA students of the Royal Institute of Art on “making a publication,” the two foreign editors of A:Art (Stuart Bailey and Angie Keefer) instead found themselves swept into the death throes of a decades-old struggle between rival institutions over the current identity and possible future of a national art scene. The book is a chronological account of events that unfolded among the Academy, the art school, its students, assorted government ministries, and the Swedish press, with accompaniment from various outside texts, including Raymond Williams’ Keywords, an ...

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“After Brad Troemel” (ABT) is an artist book conceived for the JstChillin exhibition “Read/Write” at 319 Scholes in Brooklyn in 2011. The book—originally published in a limited edition of 20—took as its conceptual core the characterization of artist Brad Troemel as a genius and a mastermind analyzed through the lens of conspiracy theory and amateur internet sleuthing. According to artist and writer Artie Vierkant, who wrote the introduction to this edition, ABT is not “about Brad Troemel, nor any of the myriad names or identities that are mentioned in its pages. ABT is about the construction of identity in a mediated ...

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“…And I was like—yes it is! Part of my broader project as an artist is thinking about how the term climate change can be redefined and expanded to enable people to understand its relevance. So climate change is redefined as an issue of inequality, or social justice, and also urban design and planning. So if I go by that broader definition, I don’t see why I should exclude those things here.” Amy Howden-Chapman in conversation with the Newspaper Reading Club, 2015

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The film charts the journey of an artist–filmmaker who is led astray from her attempts to make a documentary in Los Angeles by the mysterious history of a deceased male artist named Amboy. Amboy’s storyline is expressed with a disorienting array of cinematic strategies taken from feature films,documentaries, B–movies, and home–video style recordings. The conflation of these approaches takes place in an exhibition environment: one that includes photographic prints and readymade objects taken from the actual site of Amboy, a ghost town in the Mojave desert that serves as the central location of the film. Scholz, a painter and filmmaker, edited, ...

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An Anti-Catalog was the work of the Catalog Committee of the group Artists Meeting for Cultural Change (AMCC). A landmark publication of the 1970s, its purpose was to protest the Whitney Museum of American Art’s bicentennial exhibition, which was titled “Three Centuries of American Art.” The Whitney show featured John D. Rockefeller III’s collection of mainly eighteenth and nineteenth-century American art–a collection that featured only one African American and one woman artist. The Catalog Committee, which consisted of fifteen artists and two art historians, spent almost a year producing an eighty-page book containing articles and documents. Originally conceived as a critique of art historian E.P. Richardson’s catalog for the Whitney exhibition, ...

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Anpanman is a Japanese picture book series written by Takashi Yanase, which ran from 1973 until 2013 following his death. Heavily merchandised, the Anpanman characters appear on virtually every imaginable children’s product, from clothes to video games to toys to snack foods. The Anpanman books have collectively sold over 50 million copies in Japan.   This entry was included in Library Stack as part of a collection by Howie Chen.

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About the “Between Artists” series “Between Artists” is an ongoing series of books edited by Alejandro Cesarco and originally published by A.R.T. Press. They are based on artist to artist conversations. The conversation format permits a thorough and at the same time informal investigation of the artists’ practice and the larger social issues that inform it. By virtue of their clarity, personal focus, affordability, and innovative method of distribution, these books make possible the presentation of contemporary artists and their work to a wide readership. Since the first “Between Artists” books were released in 2005, they have gained a cult following, and ...

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About the “Between Artists” series “Between Artists” is an ongoing series of books edited by Alejandro Cesarco and originally published by A.R.T. Press. They are based on artist to artist conversations. The conversation format permits a thorough and at the same time informal investigation of the artists’ practice and the larger social issues that inform it. By virtue of their clarity, personal focus, affordability, and innovative method of distribution, these books make possible the presentation of contemporary artists and their work to a wide readership. Since the first “Between Artists” books were released in 2005, they have gained a cult following, and ...

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About the “Between Artists” series “Between Artists” is an ongoing series of books edited by Alejandro Cesarco and originally published by A.R.T. Press. They are based on artist to artist conversations. The conversation format permits a thorough and at the same time informal investigation of the artists’ practice and the larger social issues that inform it. By virtue of their clarity, personal focus, affordability, and innovative method of distribution, these books make possible the presentation of contemporary artists and their work to a wide readership. Since the first “Between Artists” books were released in 2005, they have gained a cult following, and ...

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The 8th issue of the series In my Computer, Command-Shift-4: Screenshots 2001–2014 presents a selection of about 350 images out of the 40,000 screenshots taken by the Austrian duo along its existence. Curated by German designer Diane Hillebrand, the book is born as an e-book translated into paper form. Although both versions of the book can be experienced linearly, as an usual book, they are actually hypertexts that should be primarily navigated hypertextually, clicking on links (in the e-book version) or following notes (in the paper version). In the e-book version, hyperlinks are visualized using icons in 14 different kinds ...

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“Decrophilia” by artist Matthew Raviotta stylishly excavates the exotic and familiar world of American suburbia. In a sequence of seductive and sometimes bewildering images, the book mines the trappings of comfort that epitomizes the mythic good life of middle class incomes and stable homes. Compositions with scented candles, custom shower curtains, and cough medicine juxtapose with writhing bodies and models that embody the look and feel of “flu chic.” The contrast between the longing of subconscious desire outside the bounds of comfort and the charmingly demented reality of suburban life are brought into sharp and hilarious relief.

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Every day, people on Wikipedia nominate articles for deletion and discuss whether they should remain in the encyclopedia or not. This is done on a sub page called “Articles for deletion”. A frequent reason for exclusion of an entry is “non-notability”. After I had a look at those discussions, the article about my own person (Gregor Weichbrodt) ironically became nominated for deletion from the German Wikipedia, too. The anonymous person that put me on the list wrote “Completely misses notability criteria for ‘authors’. Unsatisfying notability criteria for artists too.” I wrote a Python script to download the contents of every “articles for ...

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“Diff in June” tells a day in the life of a personal computer, written by itself in its own language, as a sort of private log or intimate diary focused on every single change to the data on its hard disk. Using a small custom script, for the entire month of June 2011 Martin Howse registered each chunk of data which had changed within the file system from the previous day’s image. Excluding binary data, one day’s sedimentation has been published in this book, a novel of data archaeology in progress tracking the overt and the covert, merging the legal ...

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“One of the ways in which the Conceptual project in art has been most successful is in claiming new territory for practice. It’s a tendency that’s been almost too successful: today it seems that most of the work in the international art system positions itself as Conceptual to some degree, yielding the “Conceptual painter,” the “DJ and Conceptual artist,” or the “Conceptual web artist.” Let’s put aside the question of what makes a work Conceptual, recognizing, with some resignation, that the term can only gesture toward a thirty year-old historical moment. But it can’t be rejected entirely, as it has ...

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A conversation between David Horvitz with David Senior.

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Draw It with Your Eyes Closed: the Art of the Art Assignment, is a unique and wide-ranging anthology featuring essays, drawings, and assignments from over 100 contributors including: John Baldessari, William Pope.L, Mira Schor, Rochelle Feinstein, Bob Nickas, Chris Kraus, Liam Gillick, Amy Sillman, James Benning, and Michelle Grabner. Practical and quixotic in equal parts, the art assignment can resemble a riddle as much as a recipe, and often sounds more like a haiku, or even a joke, than a clear directive. From introductory exercises in perspective drawing to graduate-level experiments in societal transformation, the assignment coalesces ideas about what ...

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Artist and filmmaker, Philippe Parreno, who created the documentary, Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait, takes us in Drift on a unique voyage through London – a journey without the typical purposes of a journey, an artistic, psychogeographical path – part of a series of twelve books tied to the twelve lines of the London Underground, as Tfl celebrates 150 years of the Tube with Penguin    

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Drones – unmanned aerial vehicles – are becoming ubiquitous, yet remain almost invisible. This is a guide to drawing them.

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“Dynasty” is the first e-book by the acclaimed fashion designer Bernard Willhelm. “Dynasty” documents Willhelm’s newfound Southern California existence. The constant documentation of his daily life demonstrates his humorous, inquisitive, and obsessive way of seeing the world: images of the food he devours, the scenic landscapes surrounding him, his own body, various gay paraphernalia, the texts he avidly reads, notes, and seemingly disparate objects. All of this comes together in “Dynasty” to show how incredibly present Willhelm is in his own life. The styling of his photos mirror the energy and narrative thrust of contemporary photographers like Wolfgang Tillmans. “Dynasty” ...

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Hello young traveller, how are you feeling this day? Are you well rested? No? Well, that’s quite alright because I have something to help with that, if you are interested of course. It’ll help you feel well rested, it’ll help you get to sleep, it might even help you feel a few tingles in your head and your back. So all you have to do is listen. You don’t even have to keep your eyes open. All you have to do is listen to the sound of my voice as I chant to you and over you and rid your ...

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In 1977, photographers Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel sifted through thousands of photographs in the files of the Bechtel Corporation, the Beverly Hills Police Department, the Jet Propulsion Laboratories, the U.S. Department of the Interior, Stanford Research Institute and a hundred other corporations, American government agencies, and educational, medical and technical institutions. They were looking for photographs that were made and used as transparent documents and purely objective instruments–as evidence, in short. Selecting 50 of the best, they printed these images with the care you would expect to find in a high-quality art photography book, publishing them in a simple, ...

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The issue #12 of the In My Computer series, FDIC Insured was selected out of a call of proposals issued in 2015 by the Link Art Center and Abandon Normal Devices (AND) in the framework of Masters & Servers, and will be followed soon by the publication of the online archive of the 500+ failed banks logos collected and restored by the artist since 2008. Starting in 2008, Michael Mandiberg methodically downloaded the logos of the many banks that failed during the Great Recession, and were taken over by the United States Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). During this process, these ...

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HELL_TREE is the first e-book by acclaimed net artist Petra Cortright. Since 2005, Cortright has produced a unique body of work that evokes the precarious nature of life in the age of media saturation. HELL_TREE consists of a series of writings by Cortright that exists solely within the context of her computer desktop. By turns technical, absurd, tender, and urgent, HELL_TREE is an unfiltered recording of Cortright’s thoughts during the course of her days. To-do lists conflate with poems. Motivational pronouncements interlace with inflammatory tweets. Texts and images pile and compile without any particular structure other than an unspoken directive ...

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If Art Were To Disappear Tomorrow What Stories Would We Tell Our Kids? is a project that aims to create an archive of tweet-structured texts capable of describing contemporary artworks. This project came about with the idea of ordering a huge amount of works that share the common feature of being very simple yet very meaningful. Italian artist Roberto Fassone and curator Giovanna Manzotti have tried to condense the shapeless mass of images and information of contemporary artworks present in their computers and on the web, into a simple, functional and structured system, in which the complexity of the art ...

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ILAN NA AKO NGAYON? HOW MANY AM I NOW? is a collection of images artists Amy Lien and Enzo Camacho have collected over the last number of years. Pieced together like an enigmatic travel narrative, the book swerves back and forth between images that are weird, boring, and mysterious, sometimes at the same time. ILAN NA AKO NGAYON? HOW MANY AM I NOW? offers watery, jet lagged visuals of the artists’ life and practice.

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