Computer art

6PM YOUR LOCAL TIME (#6pmylt) is a networked, distributed, one night contemporary art event taking place simultaneously in different locations, coordinated from one central venue and documented online via a web application. The project, conceived by Fabio Paris for the Link Art Center and developed in collaboration with Abandon Normal Devices (AND) and Gummy Industries, is an OPEN FORMAT and can be used by other organizations and individual curators to set up other #6pmylt events. The Link Art Center itself organized the first two events: 6PM Your Local Time UK, curated in collaboration with AND and coordinated from Furtherfield Commons, London, involving ...

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REPLACE WEB ADS WITH VISUAL ESSAYS BY ARTISTS. What is this art, visual essay thing? What is Addendum? Addendum is a series of visual essays curated by the Kadist Art Foundation. The essays are created by artists using images from archives they’re researching. How do I learn more about the art? A wonderful question. Check out Addendum. Why does the image look cropped? If the image doesn’t fit into a standard advertising banner size, it is cropped automatically by Add-Art. You’ll see a variety of details or whole images, depending on the page and ad size. Why am I seeing some ads? Add-Art works well, but it’s not ...

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“After Brad Troemel” (ABT) is an artist book conceived for the JstChillin exhibition “Read/Write” at 319 Scholes in Brooklyn in 2011. The book—originally published in a limited edition of 20—took as its conceptual core the characterization of artist Brad Troemel as a genius and a mastermind analyzed through the lens of conspiracy theory and amateur internet sleuthing. According to artist and writer Artie Vierkant, who wrote the introduction to this edition, ABT is not “about Brad Troemel, nor any of the myriad names or identities that are mentioned in its pages. ABT is about the construction of identity in a mediated ...

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Two signals of varying frequency and phase result in a perpetual infinity (figuratively and literally as it actually constructs itself in the shape of the infinity sign given the right starting values), drawing and redrawing itself over and over, a picture of timing and sequence in the center of the screen. The familiar resulting shapes are known as Lissajous curves after French mathematician Jules Antoine Lissajous and his “beautiful machine” of 1855. Devised to draw a picture of two superimposed systems falling into and out of phase, Lissajous’ machine was constructed of a pair of tuning forks placed facing at right ...

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Cécile B. Evans
What is AGNES? AGNES is a digital commission by Cécile B. Evans, the first in a series of digital commissions that coincided with the launch of the new Serpentine website and the opening of the Serpentine Sackler Gallery. AGNES introduces herself in stages: like a person, she cannot be experienced in totality through a single encounter. Who is AGNES? AGNES lives on the website. She wants to share things with you and learn about your thoughts and feelings. The more you give back, the further AGNES will accompany you on your digital encounter with the Serpentine Galleries. She will introduce you to the ...

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William Gibson’s poem played from a 3½-inch diskette on a 1992-era Mac computer running the System 7 operating system. When the diskette ran, the text of the poem scrolled up the screen (accompanied by infrequent sound effects: a camera shutter click, a gun going off) while an encryption program on the diskette encoded each line and made the poem “disappear” after its first reading. On December 9, 2008—the sixteenth anniversary of the original “Transmission” event debuting Agrippa—The Agrippa Files was aided by the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities and the Digital Forensics Lab at University of Maryland, College Park, ...

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A recent Opinion piece from the New York Times (“Scorched Earth” by Robert L. Park) eulogized the political death of what had been derisively called “Al Gore’s Screensaver.” Since his vice presidency, Gore actively advocated The Trius Project — a satellite to be put into orbit around the Earth on a geosynchronous path (at position Lagrange 1) which would send back live images of both the whole Earth and the full Sun. This project was intended to feed a series of real-time displays, installed as screensavers on computers in U.S. public schools. Al Gore woke up one morning wondering if ...

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The public discourse around AI is oscillating between salvation and the apocalyptic, often referring to images from Science Fiction. Meanwhile, in our smartphones, in search engines or in automatic translation, forms of artificial intelligence are already part of our everyday life. An ongoing artistic research on the topic brought Geneva-based artist Lauren Huret to California, where she conducted interviews with four protagonists of the discourse: Computer scientist and entrepreneur Monica Anderson (Artificial Intuition), computer historian Dag Spicer (Computer History Museum), writer and editor R.U. Sirius (MONDO 2000) and writer Erik Davis (TechGnosis. Myth, Magic, and Mysticism in the Age of ...

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Ian Cheng
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Bad Corgi is a little mindfulness app about refusing to eradicate stress and anxiety, and instead learning to exercise those bad feeling feelings. You are Bad Corgi, a dwarfish demon pup sometimes possessed by You. – Undertake impossible herding exercises – Wreck local biomes – Lose control of Bad Corgi and learn to love this feeling – Contemplate both the vulgar and the joyful dimensions of corgi herding life with equanimity – New exercises added every sometimes Features: – 3 one-minute exercises to amplify your distressed mood, and more coming – amazing dynamic herd simulation – simple touch controls – dynamic loss of control – secret characters to herd – secret behaviors to ...

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“Best of Rhizome 2012” is a selection of texts published on the editorial platform of Rhizome along 2012. Edited by Joanne McNeil, the book is, in the words of Rhizome’s Executive Director Heather Corcoran, “not just a best of Rhizome’s work, but a portrait of the year that we hope will gain significance over time for its contextualization and articulation of artists’ practices. Artists are predictors and barometers of change, and sensitive to their cultural surroundings. From texts on production in the digital age, to the influence of the Occupy Movement, from drones and surveillance, to online vernacular – these ...

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“Beyond New Media Art” is the revised, updated version of a book first published in Italian with the title “Media, New Media, Postmedia” in 2010. Through the circulation of excerpts, reviews and interviews, the book produced some debate outside of Italy, which persuaded the author to release, three years later, this English translation. “Beyond New Media Art” is an attempt to analyze the current positioning of so-called “New Media Art” in the wider field of contemporary arts, and to explore the historical, sociological and conceptual reasons for its marginal position and under-recognition in recent art history. On the other hand, this ...

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Born Digital is a benefit auction and an online exhibition made to support the activities of the Link Art Center on the online auction platform Paddle8. The event—the first with this focus taking place in Europe on this scale—includes more than 50 works kindly provided by 33 artists. For two weeks long, from April 15 to April 30, 2014, people and collectors are invited to visit the works and eventually to bid to support the artists and the organizers. The Link Art Center is the first Italian organization to collaborate with Paddle8, an online auction house that partners with non-profit organizations ...

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The resulting flickering light repeats at a constant frequency between 8 and 13 Hz matching the brain’s alpha waves present in deep relaxation, such as drifting into sleep. When a viewer closes their eyes, sits close to the machine and the turntable is started, the flickering light induces waves of color and repeating geometric patterns that form and re-form in the mind’s eye. Ian Somerville described the experience in a letter to Gysin: Visions start with a kaleidoscope of colors on a plane in front of the eyes and gradually become more complex and beautiful, breaking like surf on a shore ...

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Cloning Aura. Art in the Age of Copycats is an essay that explores the close relation between practices of appropriation and the questioning of authorship, from the avantgardes to Post-Internet, going through Postmodernism, 70s-80s subcultural movements, net.art and the Surfing Club generation. Written in Italian, the essay is made of thousands of text quotations mined from hundreds of papers, glued together in a sort of “crazy quilt” that nonetheless holds a linear narrative. The writing technique employed is usually referred to as patch-writing, here used to speak about appropriation through an act of appropriation, and to make a statement about the information ...

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The last decade has seen an incredible growth in the production and distribution of images and other cultural artefacts. The internet is the place where all these cultural products are stored, classified, voted, collected and trashed. What is the impact of this process on art making and on the artist? Which kind of dialogue is going on between amateur practices and codified languages? How does art respond to the society of information? This is a book about endless archives, image collections, bees plundering from flower to flower and hunters crawling through the online wilderness.

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The 8th issue of the series In my Computer, Command-Shift-4: Screenshots 2001–2014 presents a selection of about 350 images out of the 40,000 screenshots taken by the Austrian duo along its existence. Curated by German designer Diane Hillebrand, the book is born as an e-book translated into paper form. Although both versions of the book can be experienced linearly, as an usual book, they are actually hypertexts that should be primarily navigated hypertextually, clicking on links (in the e-book version) or following notes (in the paper version). In the e-book version, hyperlinks are visualized using icons in 14 different kinds ...

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In October 2012, a one-day online symposium created a platform for discussing the practice of cyberformance—live performance that uses internet technologies to connect remote participants. The 12-hour event featured 10 presentations and attracted an audience of over 100 from around the world who engaged in a lively, vibrant conversation. CyPosium – The Book presents a selection of artefacts from the CyPosium – presentation texts, chat log excerpts, discussion transcripts, edited email conversations, creative chat excerpt essays and illustrations – along with invited articles that respond to the event. The contributors hail from a wide range of artistic practice both online ...

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“Diff in June” tells a day in the life of a personal computer, written by itself in its own language, as a sort of private log or intimate diary focused on every single change to the data on its hard disk. Using a small custom script, for the entire month of June 2011 Martin Howse registered each chunk of data which had changed within the file system from the previous day’s image. Excluding binary data, one day’s sedimentation has been published in this book, a novel of data archaeology in progress tracking the overt and the covert, merging the legal ...

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Curated by Valentina Tanni, Eternal September: The Rise of Amateur Culture is a group exhibition that explores the relationship between professional art making and the rising of amateur cultural movements through the web, an historical event that is triggering a big and fascinating shift in every field of culture, especially visual culture. The show includes the works of 15 authors (professionals and amateurs) and a series of special projects and collateral events taking place both offline and online.

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Everything I Shoot Is Art is a collection of essays and interviews written by Swedish art critic and researcher Mathias Jansson along the last few years, and first published on various online magazines and journals. Their main, though not unique, concern are the various possible connection lines that can be drawn between what we usually call “games” and what we usually call “art”, in the constant effort to help finding a broader, more comprehensive definition for the latter. Included are interviews with artists and indie game designers, from Rafael Rozendaal to Pippin Barr.

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The issue #12 of the In My Computer series, FDIC Insured was selected out of a call of proposals issued in 2015 by the Link Art Center and Abandon Normal Devices (AND) in the framework of Masters & Servers, and will be followed soon by the publication of the online archive of the 500+ failed banks logos collected and restored by the artist since 2008. Starting in 2008, Michael Mandiberg methodically downloaded the logos of the many banks that failed during the Great Recession, and were taken over by the United States Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). During this process, these ...

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Originally published in 2008, this book documents the life and work of Gazira Babeli, the avatar artist active in Second Life between 2006 and 2010. In about 4 years, Gazira Babeli has created a vast body of works which address the world she lives in, and which have lent her such a solid, recognizable image that she has become a household name in Second Life. She acts like a virus, unleashing earthquakes, tornados and storms of images, deforming the bodies of other residents and constructing metaphorical machines; a capricious deity, she herself is a work of art, a “constructed identity” ...

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Produced as a catalogue for the exhibition Holy Fire: Art of the Digital Age (2008), this book is more than a simple catalogue. Along with the works of the 27 artists in the exhibition it features the editors’ essays along with a collective interview involving some of the most important representatives of the new media art world.
 Holy Fire is not a book on new media art, but an exploration of the contemporary art of the digital age, and a pamphlet against the new media art paradigm and the self-isolation in which these practices evolved in the last sixty years.
 In ...

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If Art Were To Disappear Tomorrow What Stories Would We Tell Our Kids? is a project that aims to create an archive of tweet-structured texts capable of describing contemporary artworks. This project came about with the idea of ordering a huge amount of works that share the common feature of being very simple yet very meaningful. Italian artist Roberto Fassone and curator Giovanna Manzotti have tried to condense the shapeless mass of images and information of contemporary artworks present in their computers and on the web, into a simple, functional and structured system, in which the complexity of the art ...

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In My Computer, by Miltos Manetas, is a collection of essays, interviews, short tales, parables, e-mails and drafts by its author. Written between 1997 and 2011, some of these texts are widely known, many others are unpublished, and just came out of his computer. All of them contribute to portray a personality who had a strong influence on younger generations of artists, thanks to his impressive body of work – including paintings, videos, installations, prints, performances and, last but not least, websites—but also to his writings. Manetas’ book is the first of a series of artists’ writings: “notebooks” sharing the ...

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