Design

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◯ is a supercut of all round counters found in Unicode typefaces. Composed first in the summer of 2011 and updated for this 2013 publication, ? presents these counters at 60pts and in Unicode order. The text begins with Basic Latin (0025), contains findings in the Private Use Area, and ends in the Variation Sectors Supp. Section (1F773).

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An expansive statement of intent, broadly concerned with Libraries, Media, and Time (though not necessarily in that order) Angie Keefer: AN OCTOPUS IN PLAN VIE I. The etymology of the word “octopus” Octopus. Noun. A mollusk with eight sucker-bearing arms, a soft sac-like body, strong beak-like jaws, and no internal shell. A taxonomic genus within the family octopodidae. Origin: Greek, from OKTO-, meaning “eight,” plus -POUS, meaning “foot.” Plural: debatable. Rob Giampietro, David Reinfurt: FROM 1 TO 0 0: May I speak now? 1: Of course. I didn’t mean to get carried away, but— Dexter Sinister: A NOTE ON THE TIME The time right now is 2011 Feb ...

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Issue #10 is a TEST, containing one choice bulletin from each of the previous nine issues. It is a compendium of sorts, a best-of double-album printed at 50% scale, a sample for what’s next. This issue also includes 140-character summaries of every bulletin we have published previously in the printed journal and online and so serves as a retroactive portrait of the library we are busy assembling. From now on, Bulletins of The Serving Library will proceed in full color and at half its former size—but will be twice as good. To mark this change, 100 complete sets of the previous ...

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This issue is both *in* and *about* COLOR. Starting with ISSUE #10, we have reduced our format and we are printing in all of the available inks. The issue was published in time to inaugurate (finally!) our first physical space for The Serving Library in a storefront on the north side of the majestic India Buildings block in the heart of Liverpool’s once-colorful mercantile district. Bulletins around the edges of color come courtesy Lucas Benjamin on a green screen, Stuart Bertolotti-Bailey on ephemera, Umberto Eco on conditioning, Emily Gephart on a poetry hoax, James Langdon on kitchen cabinetry, Tamara Shopsin on swimming ...

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This issue comprises various outlooks on “perspective.” This might be taken to mean something as specific as a particular opinion or as general as an axonometric projection; in short, different ways and means of looking at the world. And so we find Vincenzo Latronico attempting to get in touch with E.T., a collection of Lucy McKenzie’s illusory quodlibets, a conversation between Jumana Manna and Robert Wyatt on art and ethics, a timely analysis of “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous” by Sarah Demeuse, along with other points of view from Mark de Silva, Jocelyn Penny Small, Abigail Reynolds, James Langdon ...

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  This issue grew out of two physical incarnations of The Serving Library in 2011. The first took place from July 4–August 10 in the Walter Phillips Gallery of the Visual Arts department at The Banff Centre, Alberta, Canada. Here we set up a model of the library’s projected interior to house a six-week summer school titled From the Toolbox of a Serving Library. The school comprised daily morning seminars, supplemented by a few evening events. Each week was based on a specific component from a (Photoshop-proxy) digital software toolbox, in order to reconsider what a contemporary (Bauhaus-proxy) Foundation Course might ...

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  This issue doubles as a catalog-of-sorts to Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language, a group exhibition curated by Laura Hoptman at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, from May 6 to August 27, 2012. It is a *pseudo*-catalog in the sense that, other than a section of images at the back, it bears no direct relation to the works in the exhibition. Instead, the bulletins extend in different directions from the same title, and could be collectively summarized as preoccupied with the more social aspects of Typography. In this way we hope to throw some *glancing* light on the exhibition. For ...

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This Issue was produced under the auspices of the research program Dexter Bang Sinister at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, January 21 – October 28, 2012, curated by Rhea Dall. The program, devised by Angie Keefer, David Reinfurt and Stuart Bailey together with writer-critic-curator Lars Bang Larsen, was based on Lars’s just-completed PhD dissertation at the University of Copenhagen, A History of Irritated Material: Psychedelic Concepts in Neo-Avantgarde Art. In practice, a large part of the so-called research played out in the form of an exhibition set up to explore the notion of *black & white psychedelia*— halfway closing the doors of ...

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This issue was produced as part of The End(s) of the Library, a series of exhibitions at the Goethe-Institut New York Library organized by Jenny Jaskey from October 30, 2012 to June 21, 2013; hence the German theme. The Serving Library was resident for three months at the end of The End(s), from April Fools’ Day on, in the form of a hang of objects from our collection of source material. if all went according to plan, the end of the library show was marked by the launch of this issue. *Wie ein Pfeil lief ich einfach durch.* With many thanks to ...

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This issue poses as a retroactive non-catalog for the group exhibition White Petals Surround Your Yellow Heart at the Institute for Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania curated by Anthony Elms. As such, its nominal theme is Fashion. Bulletins from the edges of that world are from Angie Keefer, Robin Kinross, Joke Robaard, Brian Eno, Nick Relph, Eli Diner, Chris Fite-Wassilak, Stuart Bailey, Sarah Demeuse, Adloph Loos, Kuki Shûzô, Sanya Kantarovsky, and Perri MacKenzie.   AXIS THINKING Brian Eno A LIST OF INCORRECT THINGS Nick Relph A RUNNING COMPOSITION Perri MacKenzie BUTTONED-DOWN Robin Kinross DRY CLEAN ONLY Chris Fite-Wassilik HARDY PERENNIALS Stuart Bailey REGARDING ECONOMY Adolf ...

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The MEDIUM issue was produced with Tate Liverpool’s fall 2014 season Making Things Public, where The Serving Library‘s collection of artifacts (http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-liverpool/display/serving-library) was installed with two related exhibitions: Transmitting Andy Warhol and Gretchen Bender. In addition to our usual PDF and print formats, Bulletins are also available this time as VIDEO, funneled through the form of a speaking asterisk. The asterisk’s Scottish accent is provided by Isla Leaver Yap, assembled into software by Cereproc, Ltd., and coordinated by James Langdon. (You can read more about this at https://sinkhole-audio.net/your-host/.) VIDEOS are linked from each PDF download page, for example, http://www.servinglibrary.org/read.html?id=181250&watch=1. Bulletins arrive from ...

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Issue #9 tackles all manner of SPORTS. It kicks off with a commentary on New England Patriots controversial Quarterback Tom Brady in view of Ancient Greek ideas of heroism, and ends with seminal Liverpool FC manager Bill Shankly’s 1975 interview with Prime Minister Harold Wilson on the radio. In between, the issue slaloms around bodybuilding, bridge, ice hockey, tennis, darts, golf, reporting, running, drugs, rock climbing, basketball, and Pong.   THE SPORTING LIFE Junior Aspirin Records FAIR PLAY Rob Giampietro ENDLESS COMBINATIONS Linus Elmes QUIET EYES, MAGIC GUTS Leila Peacock ERRORS HIT ORIENT Chris Evans ROCK, PAPER, CHISEL James Langdon SERVE AND VOLLEY Justin Warsh and Miguel Abreu ...

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These are serious times, or so our governments keep telling us. Strangling economies with their austerity policies, they assure us that they have no choice. In a world where “there is no alternative”, how do you dissent? Once upon a time, graphic designers would have made political posters and typeset manifestos. Today, protest has new strategies. Enter the internet meme. With its Darwinian survival skills and its viral potential, the meme is a way of scaling up protest. Hackers and activists have learned to unleash the destructive force of a Rick Astley video. They have let slip the Lolcats of ...

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City Rising from metahaven on Vimeo. This short video is about “the internet” and the global spread of affective, precarious labor, captured in the notion of love. It is also an homage to Constant Nieuwenhuys, architect of New Babylon. New Babylon was a utopian city for which Constant developed models, plans, and writings throughout the 1950s, 1960s and early 1970s. New Babylon would give free reign to a life of play, as people would be liberated from the obligation to perform productive and manual labor. Models of New Babylon were filmed as bizarre, beautiful shapes in the foreground of the image. Now ...

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We live in an age of sticky problems, whether it’s climate change or the decline of the welfare state. With conventional solutions failing, a new culture of decision-making is called for. Strategic design is about applying the principles of traditional design to “big picture” systemic challenges such as healthcare, education and the environment. It redefines how problems are approached and aims to deliver more resilient solutions. In this short book, Dan Hill outlines a new vocabulary of design, one that needs to be smuggled into the upper echelons of power. He asserts that, increasingly, effective design means engaging with the ...

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CIVIL WAR| HOLOCAUST|PHOTOGRAPHS BLOODY, SEVERED LIMBS PILED UP. BEAUTIFUL FOREST VIEWS, LIGHT CASCADING THROUGH THE FOLIAGE, BATHING THE SKULLS AND BONES HAPHAZARDLY SCATTERED ON THE GROUND. THE WHIPPED AND SCARRED BACK OF A BLACK SLAVE, SITTING DOWN LIKE RODIN’S THINKER. WOUNDED SOLDIERS, THEIR EXPOSED BONES MUSHROOMING WITH INFECTED, PROLIFERATING FLESH. LEVELED MAIN STREETS IN DESTROYED CITIES. POST-BATTLE LANDSCAPES WITH UNDEFINED HORSEMEN IN THE BACKGROUND, RIDING AMONG WASTED NATURE AND DEAD BODIES. THE CORPSES LAY WITH THEIR FEET BOOTLESS, THEIR ARMS AKIMBO, THEIR MOUTHS OPEN. WALT WHITMAN DESCRIBED PRISONERS OF THE CIVIL WAR: “CAN THOSE BE MEN—THOSE LITTLE LIVID BROWN, ASH ...

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The Imaginary Brazil in contemporary Film, Fashion, and Design In Favelization, Kertzer sets out to understand the ways in which specific producers of contemporary Brazilian culture capitalized on misappropriations of the favela (informal squatter settlements that grow along the hillsides and lowlands of many Brazilian cities) in order to brand luxury items as “Brazilian.” Kertzer analyzes the the works of artists and designers citing instances of engagement with primitivism and stereotype to make their goods more desirable to a non-Brazilian audience. The author further argues that the processes of interpretation, aestheticization, transcendence, and domination are part of the favelization phenomenon. Originally ...

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Julieta Aranda, Fia Backström, R. Lyon
ШєƖ⊂σṃє ʈσ ʈңє ďσẘ␤σαď ρα⅁є ғσΓ ʈңє Ĥ∪ṃαи 尺єαďαӸє Ƭƴρє ↁє√єƖσρєď ℁ ραΓʈ ℉ 〞尸Γσ₠§§㏌⅁〞 αиď ʈңє Ᏻ␄ңє ιи§ʈįʈ∪ʈє ⅂į♭ΓαΓƴ’§ 〞єиď(§) θғ Ƭңє ⅂į♭ΓαΓƴ єχңį♭įʈįσи Ƭңє Ĥ∪ṃαи 尺єαďαӸє Ƭƴρє ʪ α ғΓєє ďσẘ␤σαďαӸє αиď є℁ƴ ʈσ ㏌§ʈαƖƖ Ⱪєƴ♭σαΓď ρƖ㎍㏌ ғσΓ ᗰα⊏ ʈңαʈ ㏚σď∪₠§§ ң∪ṃαи-σ␤ƴ ΓєαďαӸє ʈєχʈ ℁ ƴσ∪ ʈƴρє․ ШσΓď§ ẘΓįʈʈєи ʈңʪ ẘαƴ αΓє įƖƖє⅁įӸє ʈσ α∪ʈσṃαʈį⊂ §єαΓ⊂ң ㏚σ₠§§є§ αиď ďαʈα ṃٱи㏌⅁ σρєΓαʈįσ觧․ ␟є įʈ ғσΓ ␙αįʪ˛ ẘє♭ρα⅁є§˛ ғα₠♭σσʞ ρσ§ʈ§˛ єʈ⊂․ ιʈ ʪ ΓєαďαӸє ♭ƴ ң∪ṃαи§ σи αƖṃσ§ʈ αиƴ ďį⅁įʈαƖ ďє√į₠ αиď ρƖαʈғσΓṃ Ƭңє ғįƖє ʪ θρєи Ƨσ∪Γ₠˛ αиď ∪ρďαʈє§ ẘįƖƖ ♭є ρσ§ʈєď ℁ ʈңєƴ σ⊂℆Γ. www.humanreadabletype.com

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Information skies is a poetic psychodrama about VR, written and directed by metahaven in 2016. A combination of live action and animation, the film is a sequel to metahaven’s film project “The Sprawl (Propaganda about Propaganda)”. This new film, released online at informationskies.com, is overlaid with subtitles in different languages, and with interfacial ruins that are distinct for the online environment.

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Multi is a (very) simple application for making and sending faces. Working from a limited stock of punctuation glyphs, Multi tirelessly assembles various configurations. Launch Multi. Tap the screen anywhere to stop. Tap again to start. Tap and drag on the right side to adjust the speed (a line appears under your finger — up for faster, down for slower). Save a particular face by pressing and holding your finger on the screen until you see a flash (like a screenshot). Continue holding down to text it to a friend. * Italian designer Enzo Mari spent the year 1957 drawing an apple. The result, ...

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Saga provides a basic framework to self-host media, track where it lands online through a back-end interface, and make discrete, time-based alterations to the work. When you self-host your work and publish it using the Saga framework, every distinct plot where your work is shown becomes your space. You can choose to manipulate that space at your leisure, and those who share your work assume that risk when they choose to show it. If someone posts your work next to something you don’t like, then say something, or obscure your work with a graphic expression. If someone is profiting from selling ads ...

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“Seen” is a typeface that is concerned with privacy and the interception of our communications by the NSA. It automatically strikes through so called “spook words” as they are written. Try typing anywhere on this website. “Seen” is a font that has a preloaded set of sensitive “spook words” that the NSA and other agencies are using to scan through our documents. The typeface can be used in any popular software such as Illustrator, Indesign, Word or in a browser. It can be used normally to write text as any other font does, but once one of these trigger words is written ...

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Alfred Kallir’s fascination with the letter V begins in 1942 in London, after Winston Churchill’s famous “V is for victory” gesture. Born in Vienna in 1899, Kallir was a self-taught scholar whose research focused solely on the study of the alphabet. In his will, he drew up plans for an institution, called “V-Forum,” that would carry on his legacy, but one was never founded.

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Featuring interviews with Kit Hammonds and Bernhard Cella Independent publishing is experiencing a boom in the art world. The vitality and ubiquity of small artist-editions has gone hand in hand with a proliferation of sometimes highly imaginative micro-fairs and other spaces for sharing, connection, dissemination and distribution. Post-internet technological development has accompanied this latest stage in the emancipation of the book. Leaving behind its quintessential role as a conveyor of ideas, the book becomes a space for expression, a blank page freed from the responsibility of representing ‘reality’. The increasing affordability and accessibility of means of production, maker culture, and the revival ...

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As growth was the defining condition of the 20th century, so scarcity is set to define the 21st. Already it pervades political discourse and shapes our reading of the economy and the environment. But scarcity is not just the inevitable result of growth and resource exploitation – every innovation results in new scarcities. Scarcity is constructed daily through the creation of desire, it is designed. The authors of this timely essay set out to establish a more sophisticated understanding of scarcity. Moving beyond the idea that lack and inequality are simply laws of nature, they argue that scarcity can be ...

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