Photography

French documentarian and cinema-essayist Chris Marker reflects on French and international politics, art and culture at the start of the new millennium. In November 2001, the filmmaker became intrigued, as did many other Parisians, by the sudden appearance of

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“Picture the best interactive armchair retrospective you can imagine” – Vanity Fair Art Intelligence is pleased to present its third edition featuring world-renowned, artist-photographer Cindy Sherman. Cindy Sherman has been using her camera to explore the changing roles—and myriad faces—of images of women in media since the mid-1970s. Acting as her own photographer, model, make-up artist and stylist, she takes aim at the movie roles and masks, the fairy tales and fashions, the imagery and icons that have defined female identity through the decades. From the rise of powerful women pop stars and politicians in the 1980s, through the culture wars and ...

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Contemporary Culture Index is divided into two sections. CCIndex infoweb provides an introduction to ccindex’s operations. Please access to find accretive information about the contents and periodicals indexed in ccindex’s database. CCIndex database is an online, open-access bibliographical database indexing international journals and periodicals. Areas covered are architecture, art, cinema, cultural studies, design, literature, music, philosophy, social sciences and photography.   This entry was included in Library Stack as part of a collection by Howie Chen.

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Digital Light brings together artists, curators, technologists and media archaeologists to study the historical evolution of digital light-based technologies. Digital Light provides a critical account of the capacities and limitations of contemporary digital light-based technologies and techniques by tracing their genealogies and comparing them with their predecessor media. As digital light remediates multiple historical forms (photography, print, film, video, projection, paint), the collection draws from all of these histories, connecting them to the digital present and placing them in dialogue with one another.

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A conversation between David Horvitz with David Senior.

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“Dynasty” is the first e-book by the acclaimed fashion designer Bernard Willhelm. “Dynasty” documents Willhelm’s newfound Southern California existence. The constant documentation of his daily life demonstrates his humorous, inquisitive, and obsessive way of seeing the world: images of the food he devours, the scenic landscapes surrounding him, his own body, various gay paraphernalia, the texts he avidly reads, notes, and seemingly disparate objects. All of this comes together in “Dynasty” to show how incredibly present Willhelm is in his own life. The styling of his photos mirror the energy and narrative thrust of contemporary photographers like Wolfgang Tillmans. “Dynasty” ...

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In 1977, photographers Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel sifted through thousands of photographs in the files of the Bechtel Corporation, the Beverly Hills Police Department, the Jet Propulsion Laboratories, the U.S. Department of the Interior, Stanford Research Institute and a hundred other corporations, American government agencies, and educational, medical and technical institutions. They were looking for photographs that were made and used as transparent documents and purely objective instruments–as evidence, in short. Selecting 50 of the best, they printed these images with the care you would expect to find in a high-quality art photography book, publishing them in a simple, ...

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Damiano Nava likes to use the camera as a diary. After moving to Berlin, in November 2009, he found it hard to spontaneously meet people of his generation who might be interested in being photographed. He didn’t speak German, and it was hard for him to establish the kind of intimate relationship required for the project. “I was like someone having problems finding a soulmate, so it seemed like a natural step to turn to the internet”, he writes in his introduction. He wrote an ad and posted it on Craigslist and Exberliner. For about two years, the ad generated ...

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For Monument, photographer Jason Fulford and writer Hernán Díaz visit Passaic, NJ to look for monuments, and find the codes of a post-industrial ruin.

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Moving Mountains (1850–2012) considers an analog history of photography within the digital torrent that is its current technological manifestation. Penelope Umbrico steadies her focus on the mountain: oldest subject, stable object, immovable landmark, site of orientation, place of spiritual contemplation. The mountain, the photographer, the book—these are the masters.  Umbrico employs smartphone camera apps to make new photographs of the images of mountains that appear in the Aperture Masters of Photography books. The artist states: “Pointing my iPhone down at these mountains, the hallucinogenic effects of the camera apps’s filters blend with the disorienting effects of the iPhone’s gravity sensor. ...

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Twenty years after cultivating a new orientation for aesthetics via the concept of non-photography, François Laruelle returns, having further developed his notion of a non-standard aesthetics. Published for the first time in a bilingual edition, Photo-Fiction, a Non-Standard Aesthetics expounds on Laruelle’s current explorations into a photographic thinking as an alternative to the worn-out notions of aesthetics based on an assumed domination of philosophy over art. He proposes a new philosophical photo-fictional apparatus, or philo-fiction, that strives for a discursive mimesis of the photographic apparatus and the flash of the Real entailed in its process of image making. “A bit ...

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Photomediations: A Reader offers a radically different way of understanding photography. The concept of photomediations that unites the twenty scholarly and curatorial essays collected here cuts across the traditional classification of photography as suspended between art and social practice in order to capture the dynamism of the photographic medium today. It also explores photography’s kinship with other media – and with us, humans, as media. The term ‘photomediations’ brings together the hybrid ontology of ‘photomedia’ and the fluid dynamism of ‘mediation’. The framework of photomediations adopts a process- and time-based approach to images by tracing the technological, biological, cultural, social and political ...

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Released on the occasion of the presentation of the exhibition Collect the WWWorld. The Artist as Archivist in the Internet Age at 319 Scholes, New York (October 18–November 4, 2012), this book presents Ryan Trecartin’s series of prints “A Lossless Fall 2010” together with its background documentation, in order to allow the reader to better get into an iconic, seminal piece of contemporary art. In November 2010, Ryan Trecartin published in the fashion and design magazine “W” the portraits of four of his long time collaborators: Lizzie Fitch, Veronica Gelbaum, Telfar Clemens, and Ashland Mines. The group was titled “A ...

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Artist Erin Shirreff’s motivation for developing Shadow, Glare, the first work she’s designed for a digital environment, stems from those moments when the screen’s material presence becomes impossible to ignore, when dust accumulations, errant smudges, and the movement of shadows and glares disturb the illusion of transparency. “In my living room the light will shift,” Shirreff explains, “and suddenly I’ll be looking at all the dust on my computer screen, or the splotches of light. That will really jar me back into my chair.” Originally from the article Shadow, Glare.

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Spirit Surfing is an attempt to preserve and share a body of texts and visual essays written by artist, actor and musician Kevin Bewersdorf between 2002 and 2010, collected and edited by Domenico Quaranta without the explicit consent of the author, but according to his philosophy of sharing. Bewersdorf has been very active online between 2007 and 2009, as one of the leading figures of the so-called “pro-surfers” generation. With his works and texts, he had a long-standing influence on the practice and theory of art, not only net-based. When, around 2010, he decided to stop actively promoting himself as an artist, ...

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The Miracle of Analogy is the first of a two-volume reconceptualization of photography. It argues that photography originates in what is seen, rather than in the human eye or the camera lens, and that it is the world’s primary way of revealing itself to us. Neither an index, representation, nor copy, as conventional studies would have it, the photographic image is an analogy. This principle obtains at every level of its being: a photograph analogizes its referent, the negative from which it is generated, every other print that is struck from that negative, and all of its digital “offspring.” Photography is ...

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This is the fifth artist book by artist Wolfgang Tillmans produced in conjunction with the exhibition ‘Affinity’ at Wako Works of Art, Tokyo.

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Words Without Pictures was conceived by curator Charlotte Cotton and artist Alex Klein as a means of creating space for thoughtful and urgent discourse around current issues in photography. Every month for a year, an artist, educator, critic, art historian, or curator was invited to contribute a short, un-illustrated, and opinionated essay about an aspect of photography that, in his or her view, was either emerging or in the process of being rephrased. Each piece was available on the Words Without Pictures website for one month and was accompanied by a discussion forum, which received both invited and unsolicited responses ...

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