Index of Titles Filed Under 'Artist Conversations'

Art cannot solve the problems of 2017, Alexander Kluge says to Hans Ulrich Obrist in this issue, but it can start solving the problems of 2036. Though it may begin in the affective work of mourning, art moves towards a rational archeology and a realistic anticipation. We could call this “futurist realism,” a vision of the coming decades as a series of problems to be solved, rather than as a source for transcendent salvations or damnations of whatever fashion. Unlike the ecstatic or dispirited futurisms we are accustomed to, futurist realism looks forward with no false regrets. Bad-faith futurism, by ...

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In 1964, Calvin Tomkins spent a number of afternoons interviewing Marcel Duchamp in his apartment on West 10th Street in New York. Casual yet insightful, Duchamp reveals himself as a man and an artist whose playful principles toward living freed him to make art that was as unpredictable, complex, and surprising as life itself. Those interviews have never been edited and made public, until now. The Afternoon Interviews, which includes an introductory interview with Tomkins reflecting on Duchamp as an artist, guide, and friend, reintroduces the reader to key ideas of his artistic world and renews Duchamp as a vital model ...

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When artist Frances Stark and Snapchat developer David Kravitz discussed the idea of having sex on stage during a public presentation at the New Museum last spring, it wasn’t entirely surprising. This proposal came as part of Rhizome’s Seven on Seven Conference, which pairs artists and technologists for a one-day collaboration with the prompt to “make something” and then present it to the public the following day. During their presentation, neither of their bodies was on view on stage (Kravitz came up alone for the Q&A). Instead, they appeared onscreen via a live iMessage conversation. Soon, Kravitz was telling Stark about his ...

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To broaden the discussion of 21st century consciousness and aesthetic production, Silvershed contacted three artists: Matt Mullican, John McCracken, and Peter Halley. As a selection, these three artists address cultural shifts in the 70s and 80s with early digital inquiries in their work–demonstrating a broadening range of aesthetics, application, and production. The artists’ conversations have been fruitful in many ways and expanded the scope of our initial questions, engendering renewed ways to look and to think about their work today.

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