Index of Titles Filed Under 'Contemporary Art'

Contemporary aesthetic practices operate with the fabric of reality as interferences that open up interstices of problematization and place the world in work. The singularity of a proposal lies in the part of reality in which it is inscribed and in the procedures of its inscription: the more subtle and precise these are, the greater its critical power and the greater the impact of its effects. This is the perspective in which Lygia Clark’s final and most radical work, Estruturação do self (Structuring of the Self), is focused. An experimental practice that is inscribed in the spectator’s subjectivity and, more ...

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Ina Blom is a Professor at the Institute of Philosophy, Classics, History of Art and Ideas at the University of Oslo, where she also got her Ph.D (The Cut Through Time. A Version of the Dada/Neo-Dada Repetition. UiO, 1999). Her fields of research and teaching are modernism/avant-garde studies and contemporary art and aesthetics, with a particular focus on media art practices and media aesthetics. A former music critic, she has also worked extensively as an art critic and curator, contributing to Artforum, Parkett, Afterall, Frieze and Texte zur Kunst. Recent books include On the Style Site. Art, Sociality and Television ...

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John Roberts is Professor of Art and Aesthetics at the University of Wolverhampton. He is the author of a number of books including The Art of Interruption: Realism, Photography and the Everyday (Manchester University Press, 1998), The Intangibilities of Form: Skill and Deskilling in Art After the Readymade (Verso, 2008) and The Necessity of Errors (Verso, 2011). He has also contributed to various journals including Radical Philosophy, New Left Review, Oxford Art Journal, Historical Materialism, New Literary History, Third Text and Manifesta. In 2008 John Roberts was invited to give a lecture at MACBA in the context of the seminar The ...

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Stephen Melville is Professor of History of Art at the Ohio State University and has published widely on contemporary art as well as on issues in contemporary theory and historiography. With Philip Armstrong and Laura Lisbon he curated the major exhibition of contemporary painting As Painting: Division and Displacement (Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio, 2001). His publications include As Painting: Division And Displacement (exhibition catalogue, MIT Press 2001), and Seams: Art As A Philosophical Context (New York: Gordon and Breach, 1996). He is currently completing a book on Hegel and contemporary art. In 2007, Stephen Melville was invited to ...

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6PM YOUR LOCAL TIME (#6pmylt) is a networked, distributed, one night contemporary art event taking place simultaneously in different locations, coordinated from one central venue and documented online via a web application. The project, conceived by Fabio Paris for the Link Art Center and developed in collaboration with Abandon Normal Devices (AND) and Gummy Industries, is an OPEN FORMAT and can be used by other organizations and individual curators to set up other #6pmylt events. The Link Art Center itself organized the first two events: 6PM Your Local Time UK, curated in collaboration with AND and coordinated from Furtherfield Commons, London, involving ...

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“After Brad Troemel” (ABT) is an artist book conceived for the JstChillin exhibition “Read/Write” at 319 Scholes in Brooklyn in 2011. The book—originally published in a limited edition of 20—took as its conceptual core the characterization of artist Brad Troemel as a genius and a mastermind analyzed through the lens of conspiracy theory and amateur internet sleuthing. According to artist and writer Artie Vierkant, who wrote the introduction to this edition, ABT is not “about Brad Troemel, nor any of the myriad names or identities that are mentioned in its pages. ABT is about the construction of identity in a mediated ...

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Andreas Huyssen is the Villard Professor of German and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, where he served as founding director of the Center for Comparative Literature and Society (1998-2003). He chaired the Department of Germanic Languages from 1986-92 and again as of 2005. He is one of the founding editors of New German Critique, the leading journal of German Studies in the United States (1974-) and he serves on the editorial boards of October, Constellations, Germanic Review, Transit, Key Words(UK), and Critical Space (Tokyo). In 2005, he won Columbia’s coveted Mark van Doren teaching award. His research and teaching focus ...

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Rosalyn Deutsche is a professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, Feminist Theory, and Urban Theory at Barnard College (New York). Her analytical materia prima are the concept of the public sphere, discrepancies in development, and models of public art (public art criticism), such as that done by Krzysztof Wodiczko. One of her most important works is Evictions: Art and Spatial Politics (The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusets, 1996). This volume includes the essay Agoraphoobia, which we publish here in a new, revised version of the Spanish translation done by in a new, revised version of the Spanish translation by Jesús Carillo ...

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This text by Wolfgang Ernst is the keynote lecture of the conference The Anarchival Impulse in the Uses of the Image in Contemporary Art, organised by the University of Barcelona. In «Aura and Temporality: The Insistence of the Archive», the author analyses how the archive in the traditional sense, based on rigorous classification and secrecy, must be redefined in the light of the enormous potential for dissemination and organisation that arises from the digital media: archives are now ephemeral, adapted to various supports and, for the first time, more than a specific space, they occupy time. Wolfgang Ernst is Professor of ...

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“Best of Rhizome 2012” is a selection of texts published on the editorial platform of Rhizome along 2012. Edited by Joanne McNeil, the book is, in the words of Rhizome’s Executive Director Heather Corcoran, “not just a best of Rhizome’s work, but a portrait of the year that we hope will gain significance over time for its contextualization and articulation of artists’ practices. Artists are predictors and barometers of change, and sensitive to their cultural surroundings. From texts on production in the digital age, to the influence of the Occupy Movement, from drones and surveillance, to online vernacular – these ...

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Born Digital is a benefit auction and an online exhibition made to support the activities of the Link Art Center on the online auction platform Paddle8. The event—the first with this focus taking place in Europe on this scale—includes more than 50 works kindly provided by 33 artists. For two weeks long, from April 15 to April 30, 2014, people and collectors are invited to visit the works and eventually to bid to support the artists and the organizers. The Link Art Center is the first Italian organization to collaborate with Paddle8, an online auction house that partners with non-profit organizations ...

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Néstor García Canclini (Argentina, 1939) has been a professor and researcher at the Mexico’s Autonomous Metropolitan University, Iztapalapa Unit, where he directs the Cultural Studies Program. He has traveled to many Universities as a visiting professor, among them Naples, Austin, Stanford, Barcelona, Buenos Aires and São Paulo, and has published more than 20 books on Cultural Studies, globalization and Urban Imagination, many of which has been translated to other languages. Among those, important titles are Hybrid Cultures(1995), which won the Latin American Studies Association’s award for best book about Latin America, and Las culturas populares en el capitalismo (1981), which ...

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In October 2012, a one-day online symposium created a platform for discussing the practice of cyberformance—live performance that uses internet technologies to connect remote participants. The 12-hour event featured 10 presentations and attracted an audience of over 100 from around the world who engaged in a lively, vibrant conversation. CyPosium – The Book presents a selection of artefacts from the CyPosium – presentation texts, chat log excerpts, discussion transcripts, edited email conversations, creative chat excerpt essays and illustrations – along with invited articles that respond to the event. The contributors hail from a wide range of artistic practice both online ...

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Suely Rolnik is a psychoanalyst, writer and teacher of clinical psychology at the Catholic University of São Paulo, where she co-ordinates the Centre for Research on Subjectivity (Núcleo de Estudios de la Subjetividad). She lived in exile in Paris from 1970 to 1979, where she graduated in philosophy, social sciences and psychology. During this time, she forged a relationship with the philosopher Gilles Deleuze – some of whose work she translated into Portuguese – and Guattari. Rolnik’s friendship with the artist Lygia Clark, whose last work Estructuraçaõ do self, was the subject of her thesis in France (1978) as well ...

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Having no body and no name is a small price to pay forbeing wild, for being free to move across (some) countries,(some) political boundaries, (some) historical ideologies, and(some) economies. I am the supercommunity, and you areonly starting to recognize me. I grew out of something thatused to be humanity. Some have compared me to angrycrowds in public squares; others compare me to wind andatmosphere, or to software. Some say they have seen memoving through jet–lagged artists and curators, or migrantlaborers, or a lost cargo ship that left a trail of rubber ducksthat will wash up on the shores of the ...

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The texts gathered in this issue of e-flux journal reflect upon the censorship of Cuban artists that has taken place in the shadow of the political negotiations between the island and the United States. They are the words of Cuban intellectuals who have chosen to respond to erasures brought about by overzealous state authority, a politics of complicity among Cuban artists, and the strategic blindness of Cuba’s enthusiasts.

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The freeport method of art storage presents its critics with a problem. Is it something new? Or something old? What could be less surprising than an international aristocracy hiding treasures in a cave someplace? The CEO of the Geneva Freeport might have overcharged his Russian Oligarch, Dmitry Rybolovlev, by one billion dollars for thirty-five paintings, according to Sam Knight’s recent, riveting account. Rybolovlev had himself acquired a large slice of the collective ownership of the means of production in 1992, when he was twenty-nine, in the form of Uralkali, a mining company developed by the State Planning Committee of the ...

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Tech is never simply technology. It never appears in the abstract, any more than the characters “H2O” appear anywhere on water. Tech is always specific. How old should someone be when they first have sex? How old before they get their first cell phone? This sequence unsettles us because it is hard to think about either inevitability. Sex and technology are instruments of desire, the objects and system of adult unfreedom. Children at play are so analog. Young is life before text. We clutched love letters, in the past, when we couldn’t clutch each other. Now our phones get warm ...

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Businesspeople talk about art like artists talk about money: gratuitously, without compensation. Hired to talk about money, an entrepreneur will speak in terms of art. Put an artist on a panel and you will often get disquisitions on exchange, capital, and commerce. Both constituencies are compelled by what lies outside their professional responsibility, and the response to this compulsion vibrates between veneration and contempt. For every Übermensch crypto-expressionist billionaire patron, there is one who sneers at the foolish valuelessness of art history and its scribes. For every dedicated anticapitalist artist, there is one who happily understands themselves to be making ...

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Early in the new century, it is already clear that the vanguards of the last one were less a singular, sequential telos than a symptomatic cycle. Movements like impressionism, abstraction, conceptualism, or symbolism are more like weather patterns that recur under certain circumstances than historical exceptions never to be repeated. There are everyday sprinkles of impressionism which relate to a Monet in the same way that the average rainstorm relates to a hurricane. In “Towards the New Realism,” Boris Groys examines the revival of what is still the most suggestive and polyamorous of these commitments, the pursuit of the real. ...

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José Antonio Sánchez is a professor at the Faculty of Fine Arts in Cuenca, where he lectures in Performing Arts History and Contemporary Art and Literature. He is the author of numerous texts on the theory and history of the performing arts, as well as the books Brecht y el Expresionismo (1992), Dramaturgias de la imagen (1994, 1999, and 2002) and La escena moderna. Antología de manifiestos y textos sobre teatro de la época de vanguardias(Akal, Madrid, 1999). He is also the editor of Desviaciones (1999), El arte de la danza y otros escritos de Isadora Duncan (2003), Cuerpos sobre ...

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Curated by Valentina Tanni, Eternal September: The Rise of Amateur Culture is a group exhibition that explores the relationship between professional art making and the rising of amateur cultural movements through the web, an historical event that is triggering a big and fascinating shift in every field of culture, especially visual culture. The show includes the works of 15 authors (professionals and amateurs) and a series of special projects and collateral events taking place both offline and online.

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Everything I Shoot Is Art is a collection of essays and interviews written by Swedish art critic and researcher Mathias Jansson along the last few years, and first published on various online magazines and journals. Their main, though not unique, concern are the various possible connection lines that can be drawn between what we usually call “games” and what we usually call “art”, in the constant effort to help finding a broader, more comprehensive definition for the latter. Included are interviews with artists and indie game designers, from Rafael Rozendaal to Pippin Barr.

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The issue #12 of the In My Computer series, FDIC Insured was selected out of a call of proposals issued in 2015 by the Link Art Center and Abandon Normal Devices (AND) in the framework of Masters & Servers, and will be followed soon by the publication of the online archive of the 500+ failed banks logos collected and restored by the artist since 2008. Starting in 2008, Michael Mandiberg methodically downloaded the logos of the many banks that failed during the Great Recession, and were taken over by the United States Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). During this process, these ...

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