The radical group known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has obliterated or threatened to obliterate many historic sites and artifacts in Iraq and Syria. The losses include more than 40 major cultural heritage sites, such as the Mosul Museum and the archeological sites of Nineveh, Nimrud, Hatra, and Ashur in Iraq and Palmyra in Syria, with at least 14 sites destroyed in 2014 and 27 in 2015. By late 2015, the Islamic State (as it has become known with its expansion beyond Syria and Iraq) reached Libya, posing serious threats to the country’s Greek and Roman antiquities and prehistoric artwork. Following the recent liberation of ISIS-controlled areas in northern Iraq, researchers at the American Schools of Oriental Research Cultural Heritage Initiatives reported that extensive destruction has taken place at two capital cities of ancient Mesopotamia. Throughout 2016 the quantity and range of demolitions have relatively slowed; however, the ISIS threats are still imminent…