Libraries, Sustainability and Degrowth

In 2015, the American Library Association adopted the Resolution on the Importance of Sustainable Libraries; since then, other international organizations have been quick to go along with the proposal, reporting on the potential relationship between sustainability and libraries. However, such documents (which, in general, support the role of librarians in building “sustainable, resilient and regenerative” communities and making “sustainable decisions”) remain purely statements of intent… that include a handful of trendy topics in their paragraphs, and fall short of being credible action plans. It is worrying to note that, despite the seriousness and urgency of the discussion, these statements tiptoe ...

Virtues Impracticable and Extremely Difficult: The Human Rights of Subsistence Diggers

Contributors Sam Hardy, Bryce Wilner
In the bloody and destructive aftermath of the U.S.-led Coalition’s invasion of Iraq in 2003, cultural heritage workers debated how to prevent or suppress the looting of museums and archaeological sites. At the Fifth World Archaeological Congress, held in Washington, D.C. three months after the invasion, the destruction and looting of Iraqi cultural property, and the ethical responsibilities of archaeologists, were central concerns. Troubled by the explicit statements of some archaeologists and the implicit tone of others, I submitted Proposition 15. It cited the human right to “a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and ...

Extract and Preserve: Underground Repositories for a Posthuman Future?

Underground nuclear and military materials have been the subject of international commissions, tribunals, and wars. Yet subterranean facilities also commonly inventory a similarly volatile, though less noxious, resource: information. SubTropolis’s central location, solidity, and security have drawn technology companies, who host data centers in the mine’s massive pillared rooms. Many underground garrisons and command centers of the Cold War era have likewise become “data bunkers.” Given that industrial metaphors of “mining” and “smithing” have long pervaded the discourses of intellectual labor, it should be no surprise that we’re now data mining inside our mines. And alongside the subterranean servers and ...

Planet Gratitude

The iPhone 3G, this innocuous and already slightly outmoded little cluster of minerals and marketing, is an emblematic meeting point for the material and symbolic processes shaping the contemporary entanglement of social and geologic stratifications: both product and engine of the great cleavages of the global economy, those geopolitical fractures that Marxist critics refer to with euphemistic kid gloves as “uneven development;” a treasured possession bound up with resource wars and environmentally destructive extraction practices driven by a rapacious global system of neo-colonial corporate-feudalism; the consumer excretion of a world where exhausted Chinese factory workers are driven to suicide satisfying ...

There Is Neither Truth Nor Reconciliation in South Africa

In this conversation with Léopold Lambert in the Center for Applied Legal Studies at Wits University (Johannesburg) that he directs, Tshepo Madlingozi exposes the many reasons that made the 1996 Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) a reinforcement of settler colonialism and white supremacy in South Africa. Associating the theoretical framework of Steve Biko’s Black Consciousness with a legal examination of the way “transitional justice” has been operating since the official end of the Apartheid in 1994, Tshepo shows us that actual decolonization of what he calls “the country with no name” has never been on the table. Tshepo Madlingozi is a ...

Over-Beliefs: Collected Writing 2011-2018

This book was published on the occasion of THROUGH AND THROUGH AND THROUGH, an exhibition of new work by Gordon Hall, curated by Roya Amirsoleymani and Kristan Kennedy, com- missioned and presented by the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art in Portland, Oregon from June 8–August 10, 2019.

Failed Architecture Podcast 10

Mecca is the holiest city in the Islamic religion and the birthplace of the prophet Mohamed. Located just off Saudi Arabia’s western coast, all Muslims are required to visit at least once in their life if they are physically able to. With air travel becoming easier, the number of pilgrims has been rising rapidly over the last few decades, with a record number of 3 million people visiting Mecca simultaneously during the 2012 Hajj. More recently, visa regulations have been made more strict to keep the situation under control. In this episode, we discuss with various experts how this rising number ...

Archives

Archives have become a nexus in the wake of the digital turn. This book sets out to show how expanded archival practices can challenge contemporary conceptions and inform the redistribution of power and resources. Calling for the necessity to reimagine the potentials of archives in practice, the three contributions ask: Can archives fulfill their paradoxical potential as utopian sites in which the analog and the digital, the past and future, and remembrance and forgetting commingle?

New Models Podcast 17: NONFOOD

Founders of nonfood, Lucy Chinen & Sean Raspet discuss contemporary food supply chains and sustainable food futures, including the R&D of their own algae-based nonbar. Along the way, we address: monocultures, fear, skeuomorphic flavor, cellular agriculture, and the real cost of “all-natural.” (w/ Caroline Busta, Daniel Keller, @LILINTERNET)

State to Stateless Machines: A Trajectory

James Bridle (one of Wired magazine’s 100 most influential people in Europe) is an artist and writer working across technologies and disciplines. In 2018, he curated the exhibition and conference Transnationalisms, produced by Aksioma in the framework of the international cooperation project State Machines. Bridle has spent the recent years researching citizenship-by-investment and related technologies: special economic zones and free trade areas, freeports and seasteads, blockchain and other supposedly emancipatory but inhuman and asset-based protocols for identity management. At every level, the mass movement of peoples and the rise of planetary-scale computation is changing the way we think and understand ...

Somatic Knowledge

Episode 10: Somatic Knowledge Sonia Fernández Pan in conversation with artist Ania Nowak about the intimate connection between feeling and thinking, different forms and manifestations of love, as well the ambiguity of care, the situation of women in performing arts, and female bodies where illness and disease could also be a social symptom and not only a personal condition.

Droste Effect Bulletin #19: Flow Out

Collective Çukurcuma included video works of Funa Ye and the Istanbul Queer Art Collective as part of the FLOW OUT exhibition, hosted by Bilsart, Istanbul until June 30, 2019. The program is based on the common practice of thinking, expressing and writing collectively about the present. As co-authors, they continued to write the collective essay through email exchanges — no one is the owner of the piece, whereas each of them is a participant. FLOW OUT does not belong to a place, but it refers to contemporaneity, addressing the problem of authorship in a collaboration, and experimenting with the idea ...

It's Me!

It’s Me! is science fiction in the literal sense. As modern science seems to be incapable of explaining consciousness – specifically, the binding of distributively processed, neuronal microexperiences into unitary, experiential objects apprehended by a unitary phenomenal self – David Pearce argues that we will need to revise our notions of both the intrinsic nature of the physical and the quasiclassicality of neurons. As a consequence, his essay “Nonmaterialist Physicalism“ gives a novel, experimentally testable prediction of quantum superpositions (“Schrödinger’s cat” states) of neuronal feature-processors in the central nervous system at sub-femtosecond timescales. In Ingo Niermann’s companion piece “How the ...

NM SPECIAL REPORT: BLACK SOCIALISTS launch DUAL POWER MAP

Contributors Lil Internet, Caroline Busta, Z
New Models speaks with Z, founder of Black Socialists of America (BSA) about the organization’s recently launched DUAL POWER MAP: a critical tool for building a new economic order in America within the existing capitalist structure, starting with black worker-owned businesses and co-ops

Model and Countermodel

Model and Countermodel is a reader of collected texts about practitioners who have proposed risky yet rigorous alternatives to conventional wisdom across art, design and architecture including exemplary attitudes, frameworks, methodologies and methods. In November 2016, a printed and comb-bound edition was featured in Practices of Enquiry, an exhibition of experimental enquiry-based learning by students, graduates and staff of University of the Arts London.

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