Available Through Library Stack
8/8/18

Realometer Re-Loaded

Science fiction auteur, paperback revolutionary, agile co-occupant of literary and art worlds, admirably independent mind Mark von Schlegell is an ideal curator-guide for the bizzarro world of nineteenth century American literature. The rift in history made in the writing of Poe, Emerson, Douglass, Dickinson, Melville, Hawthorne, Henry James et al, Schlegell identifies as a fictional machine through which literary worlds become possible words, then makes a Carrollian flip into the mirror, a splash into the glass, as Cocteau showed us in Orphée. Burroughs called it the “pre-recordings”—the deep code out of which reality is projected. Schlegell calls it the Realometer…

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Martin Wong

Contributor Nate Pyper
MARTIN WONG (American, 1946-1999) painted the world in bricks, sweat, and sign language. He moved to New York City in 1978 and his work often depicted the urban blight of that time while being singularly saturated with deeply humanist joy. Wong was an “outsider among outsiders”: as a gay Chino-Latino painter, he sidestepped the detached conceptualism of many of his contemporaries in favor of social realist tributes to the gritty ecstasy of city life, homoerotics of prison and firemen, the voyeuristic nature of language, and queer black and brown love. Wong died from AIDS-related causes while in the care of ...

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False Flag: The Space Between Paranoia and Reason

Prologue When I first proposed curating this exhibition on the subject of paranoia, it was September 2016, a little over a month before the United States presidential election. Donald Trump couldn’t possibly win, and we were about to see the momentous election of our first woman President. I had long been interested in paranoia—as an affliction, a strategy, and an ontological system. I took it seriously, very seriously, but it also felt like something outside of me, a symptom of something kept at a distance. Both during the campaign and in its aftermath, things began to swing out of control. Incidents like ...

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Seeing is Forgetting 045: LA-Based Artist Anna Sew Hoy

Anna speaks about the various directions her practice has taken over the last twenty years, understanding her place within the work, and realizing that her goal wasn’t just to show in a gallery space or an art fair. We talk about the influence that peers and mentors can have on an artist as one’s career extends over a period of time.

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Robert Ford

Contributor Nate Pyper
Robert Ford published THING from 1989 through 1993, a zine that he described as a “black gay and lesbian underground arts journal and magazine kind of thing.” The Chicago-based publication foregrounded queer black and brown DJs, drag queens, artists, poets, and filmmakers. THING proudly proclaimed on its masthead “She Knows Who She Is.” In 1994, Ford died from complications related to AIDS. This typeface is dedicated to his memory. The letterforms replicate various text treatments used by Ford and his collaborators across several issues. Robert Ford (font) was commissioned by Earth Angel, a Milwaukee-based club night, in June of 2018. This Font ...

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Feminisms

The importance of women’s rights have sprung up in movements across the globe in the past few years, exacerbated by increasing social, environmental, technological and political polarities. Feminisms is the sixth in a series of online publications published by L’Internationale Online. This publication examines how women, or those who identify as female have been addressing not only inequalities – in reproductive rights, sexual rights, and in the right to equal pay – but also how plural feminisms have been and are being consistently re-thought, and how art museums can work with and respond to issues surrounding women’s rights. Feminisms play a crucial ...

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Scratching the Surface: Dan Hill

Contributors Jarrett Fuller, Dan Hill
Dan Hill is a designer, educator, and writer. He’s currently a director at Arup, a visiting professor at The Bartlett School, and Adjunct professor at RMIT. He’s also the author of Dark Matter and Trojan Horses: A Strategic Design Vocabulary, and the long-running blog City of Sound. He previously worked at the Helsinki Design Lab and as director of Fabrica. In this episode, Dan and I talk about the evolution of his career, his vision for a new type of design education, and the role of writing in his work.

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New Models Podcast 04: Psy-Trans Synth & Baselines

Discussing the discussion of gender, transitioning, transgenderism, transhumanism, and trying to find structures in a liquid world… Also ants. /// Caroline Busta, Anke Dyes, Daniel Keller, LIL INTERNET, Steven Warwick, and Ziúr.

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Monti Sans

Contributor Eric Li
The origins of the typeface we know today as Monti Sans can be traced back to America’s first successful type foundry, established in Philadelphia by Archibald Binny and James Ronaldson in 1796. Among the most enduring American types ever designed, it has now nearly realized a proverbial nine lives. Its first three iterations took the form of hand-set type and spanned more than a century. Its fourth incarnation, an arduous conversion to Linotype, was undertaken in the 1940s by C.H. Griffith at the Mergenthaler Company with the aid of Princeton University Press’s P.J. Conkwright. It was this revival, intended to ...

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Deep Assignments

Compiled by Philip Sanderson and mixed by DJ Huysmans, a mix made to accompany the Ballardian Breakfast Briefing virtual launch event for Applied Ballardianism.

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The Right to Loot

A conversation between Library Stack and Sam Hardy, a British archaeologist who tracks the black market trade in illicit antiquities. Working from London and Rome, Hardy studies Conflict Antiquities: that’s everything from the looting of ancient objects at unguarded archaeological sites, to thefts from national museum collections, to the anonymous finds of amateurs with metal detectors. Library Stack got in touch with Sam to learn more about his work, and about how this global trade cuts across contemporary politics. Sam spoke at length about how the presumed cultural right to understand the past sometimes pushes against the implicit human right ...

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State of Emergency

A conversation between Library Stack and Léopold Lambert, a French publisher, editor, writer, theorist, podcaster and researcher working under the name The Funambulist. Lambert started The Funambulist as a blog, while working at an architecture firm, but its expanding publication activities over the past five years have turned it into his full time job. Lambert’s podcast series, and a few of his books, are archived in Library Stack’s database, and his diverse output has been inspiring. This conversation ranged across his work as a publisher, his practice as an experimental cartographer, and his current research into the spatial history of ...

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Interface Your Face #10: June 5, 2018

Contributors Eric Li, Jonathan Zong

Site Visit No. 7: Downtown Denver with Kevin Hirth

On today’s Site Visit, we are going to discuss our recent tour of downtown Denver. Some highlights of the tour included Phillip Johnson’s Wells Fargo Center and Roche Dinkeloo’s Denver Performing Arts Complex. These buildings, which were an extension of a larger master planning initiative led by Pei, Cobb, Freed & Partners, play an important role in contextualizing the city within the dramatic landscape of Colorado. Completed in 1983, the Wells Fargo Center is currently the third tallest tower in Denver and among several of Johnson’s famous towers located throughout the US. The Denver Performing Arts Complex, which was completed ...

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dos episode 5: The Gold Museum

Curator Juana Berrío and artist Delcy Morelos visit the Gold Museum in Bogotá, which houses the world’s largest collection of pre-conquest gold artifacts. They talk about the cultural differences of valuing gold objects, highlighting intrinsic, economic, ceremonial or environmental aspects; the uses of plants with power; the poporo; human-animal bodies; and how to overcome the muteness of those distant objects made by eradicated ethnicities.

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