Library / Video

Ulrik Heltoft: Kabinet

There is something subtly mysterious about the films and photographs of the Danish artist Ulrik Heltoft. Drawing on literary narratives or scientific sources, his works often explore the conceptual and aesthetic potentials of specific technologies. Despite his experimental use of his media, his photography evinces a uniform clear and brilliant quality. For his exhibition at the Secession, Heltoft has created a new film titled Kabinet. It is based on a piece of social critique that has been adapted for the screen many times: Charles Dickens’s novella A Christmas Carol (1843), in which the confrontation with ghosts inspires the old and stingy ...

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A Conversation Around Clothing Politics

This conversation was recorded with Hoda Katebi, the self-defined “sarcastic (& angry) Muslim-Iranian writer, photographer, and activist living in Chicago” behind the political fashion blog JooJoo Azad (“free bird” in Farsi) to be featured in The Funambulist 15 (Jan-Feb. 2018) Clothing Politics #2. In January 2017, a few days after the inauguration of the current U.S. President and the subsequent massive feminist protest, she wrote an article entitled “Please Keep Your American Flags Off My Hijab” about which we discuss in this interview, along with many other facets of her work with regards to clothing in relation to imperialism, capitalism ...

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Site Visit No. 4: Weir Court with Joyce Hsiang & Bimal Mendis

This episode of Site Visit was recorded live in Weir Hall, a Victorian Collegiate Gothic building located within Jonathan Edwards College – one of Yale’s first residential colleges. Opening in 1925, Weir Hall, served as the home to the Department of Architecture from until 1963, when the school moved to its current building, Rudolph Hall. Today Weir Court looks over the Art and Architecture Building designed by Paul Rudolph and Louis Kahn’s Yale Art Gallery. Joyce Hsiang is an Assistant Dean and Critic at Yale University’s School of Architecture. Bimal Mendis is an Assistant Dean and Director of Undergraduate Studies at ...

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e-flux journal #88

Some time around 1882, God was pronounced dead. For certain Russian thinkers of the era, this loss provided a building opportunity: where the place of one god closes, space for another one opens. Unlike most established schools of thought, Russian cosmism does not present a singular vision, a consistent epistemology, or a unified theory. On the contrary: the ideas of its nineteenth- to early-twentieth-century protagonists are often so divergent and contradictory that they appear incoherent, paradoxical, or delirious. Russian cosmism’s known scientists, philosophers, and writers have been understood to include figures ranging from Nikolai Fedorov, the nineteenth-century librarian who aimed to ...

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Scratching the Surface: Mitch Goldstein

Mitch Goldstein is a designer, artist, and educator based in Rochester, NY. He is an Assistant Professor the School of Design at the Rochester Institute of Technology, works in collaboration with his wife Anne Jordan on client projects, and maintains an ongoing art practice focusing on experimental darkroom photography. He also co-hosted the design podcast Though Process and has written and lectured extensively on design and design education. In this episode, Mitch and I talk about our evolving definitions of the words ‘graphic design’, critique methods in the classroom, and the problems with contemporary design discourse.

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Scratching the Surface: Dmitri Siegel

Dmitri Siegel is a creative director, designer, and writer. He’s currently the Vice President of Global Brand for Sonos and was previously Executive Creative Director at Patagonia. He also was one of my favorite writers of the Emigre-era, where his writing appeared in Emigre, Design Observer, and Dot Dot Dot. In this episode, Dmitri and I talk about his interest in writing about design, going from writing for Emigre to leading design at Sonos, and how design criticism has changed over the course of his career.

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Scratching the Surface: Paul Ford

Contributors Jarrett Fuller, Paul Ford
Paul Ford is a writer, programmer, educator, and technologist. He is currently the co-founder of Postlight, a digital product studio in New York and teaches at the School of Visual Arts. He’s written for publications like Harper’s, New York, Medium, and The Morning News and is a frequent commentator on technology and the internet. In 2015, he published “What is Code?” for Bloomberg Businessweek, an issue-length essay explaining programming to a mass audience. In this episode, Paul and I talk about his childhood interest in computers and books, the early days of the web and building his own blogging software, ...

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Scratching the Surface: Paul Soulellis

Paul Soulellis is a designer, writer, and educator. After spending twenty years working as a designer, fifteen of those years under his own studio, Soulellis Studios, Paul recently has shifted his work into a more expanded and experimental practice. In 2014, while part of the New Museum’s incubator, he started Counterpractice, his new design studio, and began publishing his now-ongoing project Library of the Printed Web. He also recently joined the faculty at RISD in their graphic design department. In this episode, Paul and I talk about the significance of blogging to his work, building new types of graphic design ...

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The Fundamental Questions

Thousands of online dating profiles from the web were parsed, matched according to four questions and sorted in alphabetical order. Who am I? Where do I come from? What is my purpose in Life and what happens when I die? For centuries people have tried to come up with answers regarding the fundamental questions of life. Then the internet was invented and these questions have finally been answered – by users. The book The Fundamental Questions captures them in an inspiring record of epic proportions where every individual verse becomes a mantra of a mind-expanding collective thought. It reminds us, that one single ...

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On the Road

Contributor Gregor Weichbrodt
Based on the novel “On the Road” by Jack Kerouac and Google Maps Direction Service. The exact and approximate spots Kerouac traveled and described are taken from the book and parsed by Google Direction Service API. The result is a huge direction instruction of 55 pages. The chapters match those of the original book. All in all, as Google shows, the journey takes 272.26 hours (for 17,527 miles). This book is part of the exhibitions Poetry Will Be Made By All! (Zürich, January 30 – March 30, 2014) and Print Error at Jeu de Paume (online exhibition).

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Erotica

Contributor Hannes Bajohr
If there is one thing that deserves to be called “genuine internet literature,” then it is user generated erotica. Besides fan fiction, no other textual genre has thrived on the absence of editorial and moral oversight as much as written porn. Produced by millions of mostly anonymous amateur writers for no pay whatsoever, and harking back to the earliest days of the usenet, there is little that represents the spirit of the web more truthfully. For Erotica, I used Kimono to scrape one of the largest repositories of amateur erotic writing, literotica.com, in its entirety (10 million words, 52,000 lemmata). Removing all words that a Python script could identify ...

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The Cynical Educator

Ground down, disenchanted, but committed to education. Unable to quit, yet deploring everything education has become. We suffer a weakened and weakening cynicism. This cynicism exploits the last remaining educational commitments of an otherwise broken workforce, draining that workforce of its final pleasure: Revolt. Our cynicism is reactionary and conditional – exhausting where it might invigorate, rendering complicit, giving safe passage to bad temper – but can be reclaimed. We need more cynicism, not less. With The Cynical Educator a revived, militant Cynicism affronts us. Drawing on a long history of religious denial and philosophical intrigue, it brings our educational ...

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