Alissa Anderson

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The Avery Review is an online journal dedicated to thinking about books, buildings, and other architectural media. We see the genres of the review and the critical essay as vital but still underutilized ways of exploring the ideas and problems that animate the field of architecture, and we hope to push these genres beyond their most familiar forms, whether journalistic or academic. Our aim is to explore the broader implications of a given object of discourse (whether text, film, exhibition, building, project, or urban environment), to expand the terrain of what we imagine architectural discourse to be, and to broaden ...
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PublisherThe Avery Review2014
Amale Andraos examines cartography and Koolhaasian “bigness”; Georges Teyssot reviews that thing we call “nature”; Owen Hatherley visits three typologies of the national library; Ginger Nolan reads Andro Linklater’s recent book on land ownership (with a detour to Zaha Hadid’s Galaxy SOHO); Carson Chan recasts the monumental in the work of Aleksandra Domanović; and James Graham essays on essaying.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2015
Todd Palmer discusses the Obama library and civic bidding; Sam Jacob clutters Miesian space; Sarah Whiting explores the multi-scalar neighborhood; Thomas Kelley tours Frank Lloyd Wright; Sarah Dunn and Martin Felsen ask more of landscape infrastructure; Catherine Fennell and Daniel Tucker question the making of place; and Alissa Anderson loiters in a lesser known imaginary.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2015
Enrique Ramirez shares a few spoiler alerts from McLain Clutter’s Imaginary Apparatus; Léopold Lambert considers the corridor and the politics of immurement; Swanarbh Ghosh reads Charles Correa by way of Buckminster Fuller; and Jordan Carver reports from Michael Jackson’s childhood home.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2015
Srjdan Weiss covers the Parrish Art Museum; Vera Sacchetti reports on HdM in Basel; Jacob Moore speaks personally about the AIDS Memorial in New York City; and Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy review Latour’s Gaïa Global Circus.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2016
Studio Gang probes deep sea mapping and the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone; Casey Mack takes on Niklas Maak’s Living Complex; Meredith Miller reports from the platisphere on post-rock architecture; Gökçe Günel inhabits Masdar; Paul Dallas ruminates on film, landscape, and Peter Bo Rappmund’s Topophilia; and Sam Holleran goes to Grace Farms.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2016
Catherine Seavitt Nordenson parses the magical realism of the Pope’s encyclical; Shantel Blakely muses on Philippe Rahm’s sentimental meteorology; Rahm writes on conduction; Ross Adams unpacks Rebuild by Design; Max Holleran reports on new Andean architecture; and Jordan Carver interrogates a Laura Poitras exhibition.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2016
Adrian Lahoud looks at architecture through the analogy of the trap; Heather Davis intimately encounters the molecular; Dehlia Hannah and Cynthia Selin ponder the sartorial implications of a changing climate; Daniel Barber explores the scales of architectural history; and Caitlin Blanchfield reports from the droneodrome.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2016
Amale Andraos asks how climate change might redefine the discipline of architecture; Deborah R. Coen looks to Hapsburg geography and the origin of the term “ecology”; Eva Horn discusses a long history of controlling climate through the evolution of air conditioning; Reinhold Martin traces the imbricated forms of financial and environmental risk in the Bank of America building; Emily Eliza Scott examines the visual culture of climate change; and Felicity D. Scott finds the neoliberal developmentalism latent in intergalactic settlement.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2016
Cameron Cortez exposes state cleanliness campaigns in two Olympic cities; Millay Kogan and Marcus Owens consider how the tactics of adverse possession can be an act of urban protest; Catherine Seavitt Nordenson recasts Roberto Burle Marx as an ecological modernist; and Francesco Sebregondi delves into the paranoid futures of J.G. Ballard’s High-Rise.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2016
Caitlin Blanchfield charts the construction of modernity with a field guide in hand; McLain Clutter explores ruin porn; Marcelo López-Dinardi reflects on architecture’s political project at the biennale; and Vera Sacchetti tours the new Fondaco dei Tedeschi.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2016
Jordan H. Carver drives to Spiral Jetty; Jordan Hicks revisits the Renaissance Center by way of techno; Gina Morrow dives into underwater archeology; and Jonathan D. Solomon reconstructs the James R. Thompson Center.

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