Arthur Anyaduba

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PublisherSaraba2012
There is a statement, “Africa is a country,” used to satirize Western‘ preconceptions about Africa. With billions of people, thousands of ethnicities, several colonial histories and varied post-independence struggles, the continent is spoken of as a single plane that is beset by bad leadership, unending poverty, and the odd scenery. Yes, the continent has these, and yes, there really are some similarities across the different countries and cultures. But, the question remains: Is that all that can be said? And there is another question: How can you represent what truly is Africa? For us at Saraba, we set out to have ...
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PublisherSaraba2010
It‘s a shame and a sham to lose experiments. You could say that this is an experiment, black and white and lines, and a slight shade of blue. But on the larger, more intricate, scale, it is an experiment to see how much success we can make from failure, and how much introspection we can make from goodwill. This job—without pay—has taught us to believe in creation, and to look upon our creation with wonder, awe and intensity. That is, if this is still our creation. You discover that it has become the creation of a larger audience, even French ...
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PublisherSaraba2013
We think that to deal with art we ought to present it, not talk about it. For four months we opened our window to artists producing the finest work in Nigeria, Africa and elsewhere, and the result is what you will see. Seeing is ultimately a trafficking in subtlety, especially if that process of seeing is influenced by art. What, exactly, is art? Since at Saraba we’re open to this kind of questioning that is essentially a voyage, the kind that assembles literary content, art is a process as well as an outcome. Art is the reverberation of colour; art is ...
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PublisherSaraba2009
The way to begin is on a tiny road with no traffic, no nothing, perhaps only a flicker of light at the end of the road. This is the summary of Saraba for this second issue, and one is tempted to end it there. We received fewer entries than the first, and we could not get a Guest Editor. Our box was almost as empty as we left it. That is why there is a very high tendency for us to get despondent, end this all, easily, pocket our losses, and who can say anything? But Saraba deserves more than ...
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PublisherSaraba2016
Will you be able to tell love apart from crime or crime apart from love? Not a cheeky paradox, clearly an essential question in Pemi Aguda’s “Smother.” We are smothering each other. How might we respond? In the diaspora, Arthur Anyaduba argues in “Alimony,” the foreign African, finding a mismatch between cultural stereotypes and Western justice, takes to self-help. But he’s in a dream. Except that it’s not exactly a dream: Moses Kilolo’s “immortal precariat,” wanders into the belly of the night after a fight with his lover. He is shot. He is swallowed by infinity, ill-fated. Can we escape the “faceless puppeteers ...
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PublisherSaraba2015
Saraba Magazine announces the forthcoming publication of a special issue featuring the work of Tobias Zielony and Victor Ehikhamenor. Tobias Zielony is one of the artists included in the German Pavilion of 56th Venice Biennale of Arts 2015, curated by Florian Ebner. Ehikhamenor is a renowned Nigerian visual artist, writer and satirist. The special issue themed “Displacement” prefaces Saraba Magazine’s “Survival Issue.” A selection of ten photographs on migrants and migrant workers by Zielony is included, as well a short story and several drawings by Victor Ehikhamenor. Acclaimed Nigerian poet Jumoke Verissimo, author of the forthcoming Birth of Illusion, contributed three ...
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PublisherSaraba2015
In collaboration with Etisalat and the Etisalat Prize for Literature, Saraba Magazine presents a special issue on the 2015 edition of the prize. This issue includes in-depth conversations with the shortlisted and long listed authors—Fiston Mwanza Mujila, Penny Busetto, Rehana Rossouw, Masande Mtshanga, Z. P Dala, Ifeoluwapo Adeniyi, Paula Marais, and Kurt Ellis—conducted by Kenechi Uzor, Emily Achieng, and Tope Salaudeen-Adégòké. Ata Quayson, ‘Yinka Elujoba, Arthur Anyaduba, and Richard Oduor Oduku contributed critical essays on the shortlisted books. Commentaries on the shortlisted books by: Paul Evans (publisher of Tram 83), Jacana Media (on What Will People Say, and The Story of ...
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PublisherSaraba2009
When we remember Saraba’s first outing in February this year, our minds abound with memories of novice, noble beginnings. We are wont to rejuvenate the passion through which the rough gem of our idea materialized into what some have referred to as a ―glorified color book. Ordinarily if we could walk back through the corridors of time, we would leave the “Family Issue” intact. But with every issue, Saraba evolves and now it is with the quaint prospect of a first draft that we regard it. It‘s only logical that we rewrite a first draft. And re-issue it. Guest-edited by Jumoke ...
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PublisherSaraba2011
The task of raising a collage that forays into fashion is arduous and pitiful. Firstly, fashion is a slippery phenomenon, like a jelly hydra, it eludes even the most patient and skilled handlers, which we were not. We often cut to the chase. We exhaust our senses in the pursuit of an ideal perspective for each our issues, but with this issue, it was not business as usual, our modus operandi was put to test. Second is that there is no global approach that seeks to suck in all the fragments of fashion and adapt it for a cosmic show glass. ...
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PublisherSaraba2011
There is a certain way of perpetuating the discourse of food: relishing a meal while predetermining the next. This might be the subliminal rationale behind the “Prequel Issue” to the “Food Issue,” the culinary delight of hors d’oeuvre. This philosophy might as well promote gluttony, one of the seven deadly sins, but Temitayo Olonlua’s piece pointedly asserts this behaviour as popular during the ghastly military era that beleaguered Nigeria a republic ago. And that our “Food Issue” is timely in re-ushering Muslim faithfuls from their stint with abstinence, the milieu is primed to receive Saraba’s muse on food as a ...
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PublisherSaraba2010
Let’s imagine that God is to be traced with a golden crayon held in the shaky hands of an experienced infant. The infant asserts the moral cum spiritual right to tracing, and as Margaret Atwood once affirmed, God is a good listener. He doesn’t interrupt. In our case, he didn’t. There was tenacity in our vision for this Issue; if you wish, a tenaciousness. In attempting to define God, we came to the same conclusion as Gary Snyder, who wrote in relation to a poem, “The poem is seen from all sides, everywhere at once.” In this respect, God is seen ...
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PublisherSaraba2014
It may seem appropriate, or perhaps by coincidence, that in 2014, the year that marks the amalgamation of Nigeria, Saraba begins with a look at History. This prompts me to pause and consider the static nature of the past, its influence of the present, and repercussions for the future. The more I consider History, the more I consider History as made; the more I consider History’s multiplicity. In this issue, our contributors unravel the making and remaking of experiences, of History. From the personal, from the collective, there is a sense that history is not a one-off event. It is in constant ...

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