Tyler Coburn

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PublisherAm Nuden Da2017
Resonator with assumed responsibility of Tyler Coburn & Byron Peters Da is published by Am Nuden Da. It takes its name after the magazine Da founded by Isidore Isou and Serge Moscovici in 1944.
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PublisherDiaphanes2017
Every world view is linked to aesthetic decisions, every thought to its form, every judgment to perception and affect. The fact that this always requires an intermediary, a conveyor, is—given the omni­ presence of multi­ and mass media—both a trivial and a profound insight, the finest shoots of which range from Aristotle’s “the diapha­nous” through Joyce to the present, in which one thing is blatant: what is made visible, and how, shouldn’t be left to either the techno­ or other ideologies. For what seems far too present today, not least in the form of conflicts about images and bodies, and as ...
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PublisherShifter2016
Over the course of a year, Shifter hosted a series of public discussions, each concentrated on unraveling a keyword – a term that carries with it both a sense of urgency and agency in our present climate. By inviting artists, writers, activists, philosophers and others to propose terms and lead discussions, we opened up our editorial process to the motivations of others. The yearlong series culminates in Shifter’s 22nd issue Dictionary of the Possible. This dictionary catalogs the keywords taken up for discussion over the course of a year, accompanied by a list of questions provoked during each discussion. Rather ...
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Publishere-flux2021
We have never completely understood poetry. As a contemporary art publication, there’s no shortage of affection, admiration, or affinity for poetry, and e-flux journal has certainly published a few memorable poems over the years. But it always felt like a stroke of luck or a gift from the ether when someone brilliant would send us a poem. You won’t be surprised that this didn’t happen often. But now is the time to change that, and we’re honored to welcome Simone White as e-flux journal’s first ever poetry editor. Simone is the author of the collections or, on being the other ...
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Publishere-flux2022
As a child I really wanted to be Ukrainian. Or so I told my parents. When they asked why, I told them it’s because Ukrainians are happy people who sing and dance, while Jews and Russians are sad. I’m not totally sure where I got this idea. We did spend a lot of time in Ukraine, in a city called Dnipro, where my mother is from and where a part of my family still lives. My father’s family lived in an impoverished small town near Moscow that they fled to from Lithuania during World War I. The part of the ...
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Publishere-flux2022
It’s unclear how many people still alive today can remember feeling the strange, warm rains that fell over the riverside city of Pripyat on the Ukraine-Belarus border in late April 1986. Pripyat was built in 1970 to serve the nearby Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, dedicated to harnessing the mirnyy atom (“peaceful atom”) for the Soviet Union. For the past thirty-six years, Pripyat and a surrounding exclusion zone of inconsistent bounds bridging swaths of today’s Ukraine, Belarus, and a bit of Russia have been off limits to most human beings. In this issue of e-flux journal, Svitlana Matviyenko disagrees with Paul ...
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Publishere-flux2014
Neoliberalism began as the idea that economic rationality could be applied as a model of governance in place of political ideology. No more authoritarianism. Just the rational calculation of people’s needs and wants. But now we realize that needs and wants are not rational. They are crazy. And they take place on such vastly different scales that, without any political idea to stabilize desires and render them accountable—even simply in the sense of being legible and comprehensible—we are faced with nothing but irrationality as a governing order. Even logistical mechanisms are only the infrastructural bracketing of a rational order that ...
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Publishere-flux2019
In this issue of e-flux journal, Nikolay Smirnov examines the historical left-wing, Marxist splinter of Eurasianism and its merits in the face of contemporary neo-Eurasianist figures who have turned it towards nativist and right-wing agendas. Also in this issue, Khaled Saghieh, in the first essay of a series guest-edited by Marwa Arsanios, recounts the postwar intellectual debates of the 1990s in Beirut as a war of and on memory. A whole city can shift. The memory of what was, or what wasn’t, becomes an intellectual battlefield.
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PublisherHome Cooking2021
HOME COOKING is a digital artist-run space started in March 2020 featuring activities, movement, music, poetry, video, and more.
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PublisherShifter2013
Shifter’s 21st issue, Other Spaces, considers the body as a site where architecture’s traditional polarities of private and public collapse. This polarity, mirrored in the distinctions we draw between individual and social freedoms and domestic and political action are challenged every day by spontaneous, collaborative re-imaginings of space. Other Spaces considers the body as a self-sufficient albeit precarious architecture. It not only builds, but also becomes the very material with which to build. Tremulous bodies alone and together flout the sacred dictum that not only divides private and public space but also interior and exterior space, improvising and instituting another space ...
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PublisherShifter2013
Shifter’s 20th issue, What We Can Knot draws from George Bernard Shaw’s quip “He who can, does; he who cannot, teaches.” In this issue we would like to parse out and challenge what we see to be Shaw’s false binary, and to explore the value of negotiation and collaboration as important elements both in the studio and in the classroom. To this end we have invited several individuals who are both artist and educator, to consider the active relation between art practice and teaching in their life. We have invited them to do this through a conversation or correspondence with ...
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PublisherWhere2014
Where 5 Where 5 began with a proposition that Tyler Coburn write a speculative press release for an exhibition he would have enjoyed—but one that nevertheless did not exist. Where took the theme of Coburn’s imagined exhibition and produced three experiments. For the first, Where opened its shipping container “to anyone, to do anything” from September 12 – October 12, 2014. For the second, Where initiated a handwritten letter campaign to established commercial galleries. For the third, Where organized a dinner at one such gallery, David Lewis, entirely comprised of edible parasites. The theme and speculations proposed in Coburn’s press release were withheld ...

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