Barbara Hess

Cover art
PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. Sometime in 1971, Harald Szeemann visited Turin in preparation for the documenta exhibition he was curating for the following year. Among the people he tried to meet in the city was Alighiero Boetti, but when Szeemann visited Boetti’s studio, the Italian artist wasn’t there. All indications are that somebody took the curator through the studio and showed him around, and that, mistakenly, Szeemann forgot a small piece of paper with a list of artists’ names. Several weeks might have passed before Boetti returned to Turin (that year he took two long trips to Afghanistan) and ...
Cover art
PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. Group Material’s work was primarily topical and temporal, fueled by our personal and collective observations—and by the social urgencies we perceived. Our horizon was the present tense. In 1989, the curator of the MATRIX Gallery at the Berkeley University Art Museum, Larry Rinder, invited us to address the subject of AIDS after seeing our exhibition at Dia Art Foundation the year before, “AIDS & Democracy: A Case Study.” At the time, Group Material consisted of Doug Ashford, Julie Ault, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Karen Ramspacher. By 1989, we had witnessed several years of the epidemic with severely ...
Cover art
PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. Charlotte Salomon (1917–1943) is one of the nameless. During her brief lifetime, the only document that affirmed her status as artist was the typed transport list that took her from Drancy on October 7, 1943, to Auschwitz, where she was murdered on October 10 because she was a pregnant Jewish woman. Salomon had been incarcerated in 1940 in the French concentration camp at Gurs, along with a diverse group of women, many of whom managed to escape the camp in the turmoil following the capitulation of France to invading German forces in June 1940. Those ...
Cover art
PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. Cornelius Castoriadis never had a notebook. He wrote on the paper that was at hand. Whether it was the back of Red Cross ration tickets, the blank section of a conference schedule, or the reverse side of old documents from his workplaces such as the OECD and the Hôpital Henri-Rousselle, like a keen-eyed magpie he worked on the paper that was nearby. He sketched out his thoughts in a manner that combined an acerbic and polemical wit with an unflagging commitment to the ideals of freedom. It reveals a style that includes an alarming sense ...
Cover art
PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. Life in all its variety and diversity is rapidly becoming the “property” of corporations through patents and “intellectual property rights.” A patent is an exclusive right granted for an invention. Life, however, is not an invention. We can modify life-forms, we can manipulate living organisms. But we do not create life. The first patent on life was granted to General Electric for a genetically engineered bacterium…
Cover art
PublisherHatje Cantz2012
Roland Barthes despaired of keeping a diary.Too boring. Too frustrating. The diary disease, he called it. But there was one point of interest, and that had to do with re-reading an entry several months or years later.This could provide pleasure due to the awakening of a memory not in what was written but in “the interstices of notation.” For instance, on re-reading the entry relating his having to wait for a bus one disappointing evening on the rue de Rivoli in Paris, he recalls the grayness—“but no use trying to describe it now, anyway, or I’ll lose it again instead ...
Cover art
PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. Where the rituals of academic life are concerned, there are few exercises as rudimentary, at once essential and banal, as taking notes. A student goes to class and reflexively pulls out a spiral-bound notebook, scribbling furiously to keep pace with the lecture. A scholar produces copious marginalia in an essay or book: in this sense, his or her library is not so much a collection of volumes on a shelf as an archive of palimpsests. Field notes are the preferred literary genre of anthropologists, linguists, and sociologists venturing beyond the walls of the ivory tower; ...
Cover art
PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. There are five kinds of ruins. 1. There are romantic ruins, old castles and fortresses, temples and churches. They were destroyed by the passage of time, by becoming useless and irrelevant. These vast edifices whence the gods have fled are witness to the vacuity of aristocratic warrior virtue, royal glory, ecclesiastical authority, chivalry and gallantry as well as chastity, (self-imposed) poverty and obedience. The ancient junk now devoid of aura, halo and charisma is collected in museums, its context smashed: altarpieces mounted on walls, watched by schoolboys admiring the rump of Mary Magdalen. Romantic ru- ins are ...
Cover art
PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. Among the lesser works of the ninth-century Iraqi writer Jāḥiẓ is an essay titled “The Guarding of the Secret and the Holding of the Tongue.” It teaches two skills seldom named in the enumeration of the arts of language: how not to speak at the wrong time and how not to lose a secret by divulging it.1 Al-Jāḥiẓ wastes no time recalling that all secrets can be disclosed, and that it is a good in itself, for those who hold them, that they remain concealed. He begins, instead, by commenting on the causes that may ...

We use cookies to improve your experience on our site. Read our privacy policy to learn more. Accept

Join Our Mailing List