Ruba Katrib

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PublisherSculpture Center2018
74 million million million tons is an exhibition about the types of evidence that artworks can produce. Employing different methodologies to investigate, intervene, and assemble, the artists in the exhibition reveal subjects on the threshold of politics and the outskirts of legality: the robot, the refugee, the environment, the startup, and others. While their subject matter is divergent, the exhibition’s artists push against narratives put forth by corporate and government industries by producing specific knowledge and corroborative objects around un-mapped historical and political events. Directly intervening in the moments before such events coalesce into widely accepted narratives, they anticipate and ...
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PublisherSculpture Center2012
A Disagreeable Object brings together 20 artists who employ and borrow from the methods and artistic practices that the Surrealists developed in the first half of the century. This is not an exhaustive survey, nor an attempt to re-consider our understanding of Surrealism as an historical movement. Rather, the exhibition offers a view of contemporary sculpture identifying influences and attitudes that have filtered through decades of cultural production. The works in A Disagreeable Object respond to a decidedly contemporary context…
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PublisherSculpture Center2013
A boy plays, cries, smiles, and grimaces in a group of candid, gloss images. Josephine Pryde’s Adoption (2009) series is comprised of pictures of a well-dressed toddler. His name-brand clothing and the environment in which he is photographed give us insight into his life, but also raise questions about choice and consumption. One by one, these images accumulate into an unsettling representation of childhood. The boy pictured is complex—he is frustrated, he is happy, he has desires. He can be manipulated, but he can also manipulate. Subject to mood swings, he can appear alternately adorable and grotesque. Necessarily passive, this ...
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PublisherSculpture Center2016
Everything changes with the circus. It makes the unbelievable real and the familiar unfamiliar. Formalized during the Victorian era, the institution emerged and evolved through industrialization, drawing on elements of ancient roman rituals, street performances, and esoteric knowledge. Testing the limits of the physical, the circus requires enormous expertise, artistry, endurance, and courage. extraordinarily, it makes danger into entertainment, wild animals into performers, gravity into an illusion. though the rituals and acts of this spectacle have transfixed audiences for centuries, in recent years it has begun to lose its urgency, no longer holding the same sway over audiences. As Federico ...
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PublisherCapricious2015
Although it looks like it, == is not the catalogue of an exhibition. It is exactly the opposite, it is an independent project, conceived ahead of an exhibition. In fact, Matt Keegan has devised an exhibition from the publication, rather than the traditional reverse. Even more, an unlimited number of venues may be produced. Emphasizing the wall as a page, each one provides a temporary container for ==’s various parts, allowing Matt Keegan to act as the protagonist for the fictive curatorial project.
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PublisherEqual Equal2015
A publication is a time capsule & transmitter from here to there, from you to me. Working from this basic statement: how has your work changed since your 2012 or 2015 contribution to ==? This question and timeline could be rephrased as: How has your life & work changed in the wake of Brexit, Trump’s presidency, and the move to the right in Europe. (The majority of contributors are based in the US and this prompt is not intended to romanticize Obama’s presidency or deny repressive administrations that have come before). It is not necessary to root your response in the 1st person, ...
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PublisherLonely Samurai2014
Anicka discusses with gallerist Stefania Bortolami, collector Cristina Delgado, curator Ruba Katrib, critic Andrew Russeth, and artist Amy Sillman the viability of female networks and bottom-line economics for women in the contemporary-art world. First of a three-part series.

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