Sven Lütticken

Publishere-flux2018
Masaccio painted his fresco of the Expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden (c. 1424–28) just about 600 years before 2030, which is the current cutoff point for humans to curb global temperature rise, or risk quicker extinction. In Masaccio’s rendering, the expelled pair walk together from the green valley crying with open-mouthed agony. Caught in this moment during their walk of shame, their lips, especially Eve’s, surround gaping dark ovals: Where are their teeth?

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Publishere-flux2010
Repeated attempts to dismantle the aura of value and rarity surrounding art objects have been, for the most part, unsuccessful. Why is that? The majority of these attempts throughout the twentieth century have consisted of infiltrating the economy of care, custodianship, conservation, and considered attention granted to art objects upon entry into the art establishment. While the introduction of impostors into this ecosystem in the form of real-world doubles (such as Duchampian readymades) served to short-circuit the aura of authenticity within spaces of art, over time these impostors nevertheless began to perform the function of ritualizing a general sense of disbelief with ...

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Publishere-flux2010
In a recent BBC documentary on “objectum sexuals”—people who have loving relationships with inanimate objects—Erika Naisho Eiffel spoke about her love affair with an archer’s bow: “We were just such a great team because we had that connection on every single level. I’d almost swear that my blood flowed from my arm and went right into him. And it felt like the molecules in him were flowing right back into my arm.”1 It’s no surprise that, before their love waned, Naisho Eiffel was a record-breaking world champion archer—a love story indeed. But more importantly, Naisho Eiffel’s example seems to suggest ...

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Publishere-flux2010
Things would be much simpler if there existed a consistent means of evaluating art’s capacity to provide a concrete value for people. It’s a problem to which capital provides the most immediate solution—beyond the mundane routine of the art market, Brandeis University’s (ongoing) attempt to close their Rose Art Museum and liquidate its entire collection stands as a particularly unfortunate example of how a priceless collection of art, given the right circumstances (total financial meltdown), still finds its price. One is also reminded of the tragic decision by Middlesex University to close its renowned philosophy department in order to cut ...

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Publishere-flux2011
When Paul Chan and Sven Lütticken proposed to gather a series of “reports” on the (mostly) recent rise of right-wing, populist movements for e-flux journal, it was immediately apparent that the urgency and complexity of the topic required its own special issue. As protests erupt throughout Europe in opposition to austerity measures being pushed through by right-wing governments and EU fiscal bodies, we are also now witnessing a phenomenon spreading throughout the Northern Hemisphere in which some of the most brazen hardline racist rhetoric emerges not only from politicians, but from the general populace as well. What is going on? ...

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Publishere-flux2012
As we continue to reflect upon the chain of political upheavals of 2011, it may be interesting to consider a particular shift in the status of information technology, now that it has been deployed as such a powerful force in facilitating the rise of a new popular voice… Editorial Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Anton Vidokle An Internet of Things Keller Easterling Notes on the Inorganic, Part I: Accelerations Gean Moreno After OWS: Social Practice Art, Abstraction, and the Limits of the Social Gregory Sholette General Performance Sven Lütticken The Sound of Breaking Glass, Part II: Agonism and the Taming of Dissent Grant Kester

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Publishere-flux2012
To get rid of violence, you have to get rid of people, Tariq Ramadan once said in an interview. Of course, Ramadan meant this as an impossibility and a warning against overzealous idealism. But what an idea! By getting rid of people completely, we could have totally frictionless surfaces for exchange. Removing the human factor would effectively erase the difference between ethical and unethical behavior, visible and invisible infrastructure, finally relieving the increasingly tedious obligation to explain how political orders function, how economic transactions are guided. Those still living would only need to deal with the end products of systems ...

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Publishere-flux2013
In 2003, Slavoj Žižek made a very prescient observation to explain how the US under George Bush used a plot twist borrowed from Alfred Hitchcock to justify the invasion of Iraq. He called it the “Iraqi MacGuffin.” Now, what is a MacGuffin? Exactly. The example Žižek gives: Two men run into each other on a train. One carries a suitcase. When asked what the suitcase contains, the carrier replies, “It is a MacGuffin.” But what is a MacGuffin? “It is a device used for killing leopards in the Scottish Highlands.” But there are no leopards in the Scottish Highlands. “Well, then ...

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Publishere-flux2015
Shine and shininess are characteristic of surface effects, of glamour and spectacle, of bling-bling contingency, of ephemeral novelty, value added, and disposable fascination. Shine is what seizes upon affect as its primary carrier to mobilize attention. Shine could be the paradoxically material base of an optical economy typically (mis)understood as being purely cognitive or immaterial. Even at an art fair or Hollywood gala, surface effects are widely deployed while being categorically condemned to the domain of inconsequential superficiality, for shine is also persistently unwilling to compromise speed for substance, surface for depth, attractiveness for soul, effect for content, projection for ...

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Publishere-flux2016
The choice of cover image for this issue of e-flux journal came down to two photos: a decrepit military airplane lingering in a remote gray field, evoking long forgotten battles of a distant war; and a picture of a DIY christmas tree, cheerfully constructed from a stack of worn car tires and painted lime green. The airplane was the more haunting of the two images, yet with all that is happening around us, we wanted to resist the sublime spectacle of decimation and consider some modest proposals about how affect, art, humor, and practical resourcefulness can provide solutions to seemingly ...

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Publishere-flux2016
Sven Lütticken, Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Stephen Squibb, and Anton Vidokle Editorial—“The Perfect Storm” Hito Steyerl If You Don’t Have Bread, Eat Art!: Contemporary Art and Derivative Fascisms Ilya Budraitskis What Can We Learn from Vampires and Idiots? Keti Chukhrov In the Nebulous Zone between Class Antagonism and Violence Boris Buden With the Blow of a Paintbrush: Contemporary Fascism and the Limits of Historical Analogy Ewa Majewska and Kuba Szreder So Far, So Good: Contemporary Fascism, Weak Resistance, and Postartistic Practices in Today’s Poland Sven Lütticken Who Makes the Nazis? Ana Teixeira Pinto Male Fantasies: The Sequel(s) Tony Wood Some Theses on “Populism” Jonas Staal Transdemocracy

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Publishere-flux2009
This issue marks the beginning of e-flux journal’s second year. The open-ended editorial model seems to be working—contributors have frequently chosen to borrow, extend, or elaborate upon concerns opened up by previous texts. So far, discussions on self-design have spoken to an interest in self-building practices, the factory as a museum became the museum as a factory, while a speculative model for granting legitimacy to artistic acts in the absence of exhibition infrastructures sidestepped both spaces. An essay on the dormant potential in the art academy stimulated a discussion about art education, while questions of how art pedagogy can contribute ...

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⋱ ⋮ ⋰ ⋯ ◯ ⋯¨. The inhuman is what is absolutely large. |! |!”(-,-) |!.. //> |!._/_… It is a ););) magnitude that is equal only to itself. — From New New Testament: Book 1 New New Testament documents Paul Chan’s monumental project Volumes, a series of over one thousand paintings made out of dismantled book covers and the texts that complement each painting. A selection of Volumes premiered at Documenta 13 in Kassel, Germany in 2012, but New New Testament is the first time all the paintings have been united in a single publication. Each painting evokes how books and works of art—both considered objects of knowledge in the past—now ...

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A picture d0es n0t adequately stage reality if it = true 0r false. — From New New Testament: Book 2 New New Testament documents Paul Chan’s monumental project Volumes, a series of over one thousand paintings made out of dismantled book covers and the texts that complement each painting. A selection of Volumes premiered at Documenta 13 in Kassel, Germany in 2012, but New New Testament is the first time all the paintings have been united in a single publication. Each painting evokes how books and works of art—both considered objects of knowledge in the past—now exist in our digitally interconnected world chiefly as ...

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%%% %%% %%% %%% %%% %%% Metta World Peace = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = once praised the unsurpassable dignity of fireworks as the only art that aspires 2 ephemerality, to only illuminate 4 an instant n then fade away. — From New New Testament: Book 3 New New Testament documents Paul Chan’s monumental project Volumes, a series of over one thousand paintings made out of dismantled book covers and the texts that complement each painting. A selection of Volumes premiered at Documenta 13 in Kassel, Germany in 2012, but New New Testament is the first ...

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███ A work gains no worth > but more authority I ██████████ █████████ I █ by abolishing its own semblance. I ███████████ █████ — From New New Testament: Book 4 New New Testament documents Paul Chan’s monumental project Volumes, a series of over one thousand paintings made out of dismantled book covers and the texts that complement each painting. A selection of Volumes premiered at Documenta 13 in Kassel, Germany in 2012, but New New Testament is the first time all the paintings have been united in a single publication. Each painting evokes how books and works of art—both considered objects of knowledge in the past—now exist in our digitally ...

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