Ingo Niermann

Cover art
PublisherFiktion2014
Jakob Nolte’s debut novel ALFF tells of a series of murders at the High & Low High School in Beetaville, New England. A “fencecutioner” has killed Benjamin, the head of the debate club, and sewed his corpse to a fence. The murder sets in motion a string of bizarre events in the teenagers’ lives: from the founding of the band La Deutsche Vita to the establishment of the Anachronistic Youth. After a second murder, Agent Donna Jones is summoned and is flummoxed by the seemingly unsolvable case. In the style of a high-school mystery thriller, ALFF takes us on a ...
Cover art
We affirm ourselves as the center of evolution by saving it from our own destruction. Our new heroism is to keep things, at best, as bad as they are. What does good even mean? We are the joke of evolution—and nobody’s laughing. Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with marine scientist Skye Morét and writer Ingo Niermann.
Cover art
PublisherTBA21–Academy2021
For the past 7000 years, humans have stabilized the global climate. The greenhouse gases emitted through deforestation, agriculture, and husbandry prevented the onset of a new glaciation. Only since the industrial revolution has human influence gotten out of hand, causing rapid rises in temperature and sea level. In the seventh episode of the podcast Ocean Wants, speculative writer Ingo Niermann, most recently of the book Mare Amoris, is talking to William Ruddiman, geologist and originator of the early Anthropocene hypothesis. He speaks from his home in Virginia.
Cover art
PublisherTBA21–Academy2021
Before fish and other vertebrates proliferated, it was the heyday of the cephalopods. Their descendants—squid, cuttlefish, octopus, and nautilus—are still around, coping better with human dominance than many fish. In the fourth episode of the podcast Ocean Wants, speculative writer Ingo Niermann, most recently of the book Mare Amoris, is talking to Danna Staaf, a trained marine biologist who wrote the history of the cephalopods. She speaks from her home in San Jose, California.
Cover art
Science has to generate output. Art has to cater to an audience. Could art and science join forces to free science from definite outputs and art from definite audiences? Or would art then also be measured by its outcome and science by its audience? Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with artists Julieta Aranda, Marco Roso, and Elena Mazzi.
Cover art
PublisherFiktion2016
Amanda Susan Marie Hollis has been given the task of archiving the life of a work-shy librarian who worked at Harvard shortly after it was founded. The entanglements of history and life prove extremely hazardous and full of criminal misdeeds. What have the conquest of America, the Vinland Map, Mongolian hordes, Spanish monks, and the disappearance of a chandelier got to do with one another? Is Hollis a brilliant researcher or is she going nuts? Is there a truth beyond what can be archived? Nenik’s novel reads as a phantasmagoric prehistory of Google. Coin-Operated History has been translated from the ...
Cover art
PublisherFiktion2015
In this anthology, edited by Fiktion’s cofounder Ingo Niermann, nineteen writers and researchers address a fiercely contested commodity in digital society: concentration. Ingeborg Harms, Quinn Latimer, Arthur Jacobs, and Raoul Schrott write about the circumstances under which a text or activity can completely draw us into its spell, Dirk Baecker and Amy Patton about a shifting concentration, Jenna Sutela and Elvia Wilk about one that carries us into the spherical, Charis Conn about concentration violently induced; Nina Bußmann writes about the uncertainty as to whether she is currently concentrating or distracting herself; Sophie Jung, Emily Segal, and Alexander Tarakhovsky make ...
Cover art
PublisherTBA21–Academy2021
The ocean refuses empathetic ethics based on sameness with us humans. What does the urge to save nature—in certain ways—reveal about us and our desire? In the sixth episode of the podcast Ocean Wants, speculative writer Ingo Niermann, most recently of the book Mare Amoris, is talking to Eva Hayward, historian of science and faculty member in the Department of Gender and Women Studies at the University of Arizona.
Cover art
PublisherTBA21–Academy2021
We celebrate coral reefs as the colorful rain forests of the ocean. How could we not just save and restore existing coral reefs but allow them to spread? In the first episode of the podcast Ocean Wants, speculative writer Ingo Niermann, most recently of the book Mare Amoris, is talking to Marah J. Hardt, marine biologist, storyteller and director of discovery at the non-profit Future of Fish. She speaks from her home in Hawaii.
Cover art
PublisherTBA21–Academy2021
We can see stars thousands of light years away with our naked eye. About life in the deep sea we started to know only 200 years ago—and we still know very little. How do we have to reinvent ourselves to serve the needs of the deep sea and tame endeavors to exploit its habitats? In the ninth episode of the podcast Ocean Wants, speculative writer Ingo Niermann, most recently of the book Mare Amoris, is talking to Diva Amon, a marine biologist focused on the deep ocean. She is also a founder and director of SpeSeas, an NGO dedicated to marine ...
Cover art
Publishere-flux2015
More than ever, architects today are called upon to build gestural landmarks and grandiose signature buildings. But architecture was never only about building. It is also about the flows of people, information, and resources that shape space. Today, the practice of architecture often confronts situations where these flows cannot be reduced to modernist managerial approaches to systematizing, structuring, and mastering the potentials of space. In a two-part “Architecture as Intangible Infrastructure” issue of e-flux journal edited together with Nikolaus Hirsch, the intangible and immaterial flows that today appear to exceed the language of building proper are shown by a number of ...
Cover art
PublisherFiktion2015
The protagonist of Romanian writer and historian Sînziana Păltineanu’s debut novel Elephant Chronicles is a person free of financial concerns who explores a fluid world of temporalities. Fragments, fungi, shadows, and teddy bears accompany this character, who quickly turns to the local archives as an entry point into a past world of sensibilities.

We use cookies to improve your experience on our site. Read our privacy policy to learn more. Accept

Join Our Mailing List