Victoria Bugge Oeye


This publication presents Peter Eisenman’s Biozentrum project, an expansion of Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, from 1987. In the competition brief, the program of the complex included biotechnology, molecular biology and biochemistry research laboratories and support spaces. The design process used biological concepts and procedures to generate the geometrical pattern that establishes the location, dimension and form of the complex. The iterations of DNA molecules in the production of the protein collagen were at the base of the fractal geometry guiding the project design. These pairs of figures, with a gap in between them, were the base forms Eisenman adopted ...
This publication presents Expanding Sphere and Iris Dome, two projets by Chuck Hoberman, in their context during the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. Chuck Hoberman’s work focuses on the notion of transformable design: objects, structures and spaces that can change size and shape through the respective movements of their parts. The Expanding Sphere and Iris Dome could be considered as prototypes that can be later adapted for multiple uses — from toys to buildings. The development of controlling surfaces defined by geometric transformation, with zero material thickness, has been combined with the rigorous design and engineering of hinged and folding ...
This publication presents the Lewis Residence, an unbuilt residential project for Peter B. Lewis in Lyndhurst, Ohio, that evolved over six years from 1989 to 1995 and in the process fundamentally altered Gehry’s architectural practice. The Lewis Residence house, landscape and surrounding sculptures, were the result of a collaborative exploration of forms and ideas between Frank Gehry, Philip Johnson, and several artists. Between 1989 and 1995 the design of the residence morphed significantly from a regular composition, inspired by the Palladian villa model, into a complex assemblage of individual curved volumes, and finally into fluid and organic forms analogous to other ...
This publication presents Sports Complex, Galaxy Toyama and Odwawara Gymnasium, two projets from the early 1990s by Japanese Architect Shoei Yoh. For these two large public gymnasium facilities, developed in the same period around 1991, Shoei Yoh paid special attention to the design of the roof. For both Odawara and Galaxy Toyama the regular geometry of the ground floor, often determined by the form and size of the different sports fields, is juxtaposed with a fluid three-dimensional membrane that covers the entire complex. Acquiring an almost textile-like quality, the roof is in fact a non-standard wireframe structure composed of individual steel ...

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