Ahmet Öğüt

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Publishere-flux2015
Increasingly it seems like no large exhibition opens without an artist boycott. And the reasons to withdraw are legitimate—a gulf museum employs migrant labor under terms approaching slavery, a biennial sponsor corporation operates an offshore detention center, works are censored for petty moral reasons, a municipality passes a homophobic law, or funding is traced to an occupying state with a staggering record of ongoing human rights abuses… Editorial Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Anton Vidokle The Detweeting of Academia Luis Camnitzer Circulation and Withdrawal, Part I: Circulation Simon Sheikh CCC: Currency of Collective Consciousness Ahmet Öğüt Déjà Vu and the End of History Paolo Virno Media Archaeology Out of Nature: ...
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Publishere-flux2015
Having no body and no name is a small price to pay forbeing wild, for being free to move across (some) countries,(some) political boundaries, (some) historical ideologies, and(some) economies. I am the supercommunity, and you areonly starting to recognize me. I grew out of something thatused to be humanity. Some have compared me to angrycrowds in public squares; others compare me to wind andatmosphere, or to software. Some say they have seen memoving through jet–lagged artists and curators, or migrantlaborers, or a lost cargo ship that left a trail of rubber ducksthat will wash up on the shores of the ...
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Publishere-flux2016
Businesspeople talk about art like artists talk about money: gratuitously, without compensation. Hired to talk about money, an entrepreneur will speak in terms of art. Put an artist on a panel and you will often get disquisitions on exchange, capital, and commerce. Both constituencies are compelled by what lies outside their professional responsibility, and the response to this compulsion vibrates between veneration and contempt. For every Übermensch crypto-expressionist billionaire patron, there is one who sneers at the foolish valuelessness of art history and its scribes. For every dedicated anticapitalist artist, there is one who happily understands themselves to be making ...
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Publishere-flux2019
In this issue of e-flux journal, Nikolay Smirnov examines the historical left-wing, Marxist splinter of Eurasianism and its merits in the face of contemporary neo-Eurasianist figures who have turned it towards nativist and right-wing agendas. Also in this issue, Khaled Saghieh, in the first essay of a series guest-edited by Marwa Arsanios, recounts the postwar intellectual debates of the 1990s in Beirut as a war of and on memory. A whole city can shift. The memory of what was, or what wasn’t, becomes an intellectual battlefield.

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