Brandon Wilner

Cover art
“Those of you who follow Fake Music closely will already have noticed that Discogs staff voted to remove our label page and all of our releases from their site. In the discussion that led to this deletion Discogs user Jayfive offered input in the form of a snippet from a Monty Python sketch: “Stop that—silly!” The incident has compromised an important component of our publicity, but we continue our silly and serious project with the release of Steve Dahl’s Disco Demolition Night.” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations
Cover art
“We scholars of fakeness admit that we sometimes expect to be taught similar lessons each time we turn our attentions toward a new critical subject. We learn repeatedly, for instance, how much there is to note in a note’s absence, or that an altered tone can atone for the lack of a tone. But we have not yet done much to ask how our sense of scale performs when enacted on a larger scale: what does magnitude add to silence? Through the FCC’s National Radio Quiet Zone, we begin to ask this question so that we might better misunderstand its ...
Cover art
“Atmosphere, in a literal sense, isn’t formless. It’s a ball. Atmosphere then isn’t atmospheric — it doesn’t just ahistorically bob around out there around us. Atmosphere is the part of the past we can’t get back. Mary Hallock-Greenewalt’s machines for producing atmosphere can be technically dissected but the forms they produced can’t be recuperated. Atmosphere holds us like history cannot. We like to be held and we like history.” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations
Cover art
“Now, at this cusp of autumn, the point at which we prepare our fortitudes for relative seclusion, we feel compelled to ask whether fakeness is an insular tendency. Does work that cannot be disseminated, that puts nothing before something, create or address a public? Does nothing, as Lear admonished, come from nothing? We are heartened by the British Musicians’ Union, whose work argues otherwise (though we are wary of promoting any ideological bent that may appear in our research—we see fit to add: fakeness in music has no more of a mission than does music itself).” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations
Cover art
“It seems to us that the gravity of loss has to do with its degree of permanence. A lost key is not to be mourned long, as it is designed to be replaceable. A friend or lover is not. It would also seem that the great frustration of more serious loss is that the true deficit is unknown—some expected future is the truly lost thing. We observe now the ways in which a foreign policy measure brought about a quantifiable loss of natural resources and an unquantifiable loss of cultural ones. It is for us to point out this widespread ...
Cover art
“In his Natural History, Pliny criticizes the proverbial swan song for its accuracy. The idiom refers to the song swans purportedly sing upon their demise. Pliny objects however that swans don’t in fact sing upon their death or otherwise. Songs are slippery, Pliny’s bald repudiation notwithstanding. And fake songs slipperier still. Today we offer a few words not on avian but cetacean songs. These aren’t swan songs in the sense of finalities marked, but are indeed of a kind with swan songs in their being unsung.” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations
Cover art
In her translator’s note for the 2012 edition of Clarice Lispector’s The Passion According to G.H., Idra Novey recounts an anecdote told to her by a friend in Brazil of a Lispector reader who was sure that if she and the author were able to meet, they would feel a profound connection to one another. The young woman managed to get in touch with Lispector, who agreed to meet with her. When she arrived at Lispector’s apartment, the writer sat and stared at her in silence until the reader finally left out of discomfort.
Cover art
In 1903, novelist, film director, and anti-communist Robert Hughes published ​The Musical Encyclopedia​, a broad survey of the pronunciation and definition of terms from classical music. Throughout editions printed between 1903 and 1954, the encyclopedia’s ultimate term is “Zzxjoanw.” Purportedly a Maori word, zzxjoanw means, according to the 1903 edition, alternately a “drum,” “fife,” or “conclusion.” In any case, zzxjoanw conjures a sound, even if a receding sound…
Cover art
At the turn of the 20th century, Julius Blüthner’s factory in Leipzig was the largest piano manufacturer in Germany. Despite the death of its founder in 1910 and the economic slump that dogged Germany after the First World War, the company continued to grow throughout the first half of the century. Blüthner grand pianos remained in favor among concert pianists across the globe. Sergei Rachmaninoff, Dmitri Shostakovich, and Claude Debussy numbered among their proponents…
Cover art
Certain human recipients of the bite of a tarantula local to southern Italy fall into states of confused torpor. The spider’s venom strains victims’ respiration and blackens their hands and faces. Untreated, the spider bite results in death. Fortunately, there is a treatment, which constitutes the object of our attention here. Francesco Cancellieri summarizes the cure in an 1819 epistolary treatise on the ailment: “Sweat and antidotes relieve the sick, but the sovereign and the only remedy is Music.”†
Cover art
Sing Sing Penitentiary opened in 1826 to serve New York City’s growing population and crime rate, and was known in its early days for its stringent code of conduct. In the prison’s early days, warden Elam Lynds invented the lockstep style of moving inmates in closely interlinked lines, as well as the striped inmate uniforms used for easy identification — both of which would come to define the popular view of prison aesthetics for centuries.

We use cookies to improve your experience on our site. Read our privacy policy to learn more. Accept

Join Our Mailing List