Pamphlets

“Does funkiness have anything to do with mourning? Does it depend on how we use the word (do we attribute something of the stinky to the offbeat?)? How can funkiness precede funk? Is it the job of funkiness to flatten pomp? Can we ignore mourning when we think about funk? (What does Alphonse Allais have to do with this?)” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations

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“While we have concerned ourselves specifically with the exploration of fakeness in music, we readily admit that we are not experts on the matter. In imagining our inability to reissue the gravestone of Alfred Schnittke, a composer whose work we do not know intimately, it occurred to us to invite our Schnittke-adoring friend the composer and conductor William C. White to frame this work for our catalog. He is our first guest contributor; we thank him for his enthusiasm and attentiveness.” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations

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“Until now our catalog has included music that is intentionally fake, that was designed not to be listened to. With our tenth nonreissue we broaden our scope to include the unintentional—music that was at one point real but has circumstantially become fake. The lost works of Maria Anna “Nannerl” Mozart open this new avenue.” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations

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“In the sense that it might leave our active memories as easily as details of a novel’s plot or names of cities visited, knowledge of fakeness is not unique. A piece of fake music that we’ve encountered in the past might only be present in our sensitivity toward newer ones. But with any luck, some aspect of daily rote will jiggle such information loose from forgottenness long enough for us to notice and document it, as happened with our friend and sibling Bryce Wilner, who, we are pleased to report, remembered a fake piece of music used as a joke and ...

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“While the slate-sweeping and resolve-invigoration kindled by this new year rolls or fumbles on (year of the monkey, we understand), we’re happy to announce that we remain unable to turn to the new or even to the renewed. Nor the old. The objects of our attention hover out there where we can’t really pay attention to them. If we can’t turn to them, we nevertheless can (should?) have this unavailability underscored by more parties, which we have done here with Lauren Fulton, a curator, writer, and our third guest contributor.” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations

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“Those of you who follow Fake Music closely will already have noticed that Discogs staff voted to remove our label page and all of our releases from their site. In the discussion that led to this deletion Discogs user Jayfive offered input in the form of a snippet from a Monty Python sketch: “Stop that—silly!” The incident has compromised an important component of our publicity, but we continue our silly and serious project with the release of Steve Dahl’s Disco Demolition Night.” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations

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“We scholars of fakeness admit that we sometimes expect to be taught similar lessons each time we turn our attentions toward a new critical subject. We learn repeatedly, for instance, how much there is to note in a note’s absence, or that an altered tone can atone for the lack of a tone. But we have not yet done much to ask how our sense of scale performs when enacted on a larger scale: what does magnitude add to silence? Through the FCC’s National Radio Quiet Zone, we begin to ask this question so that we might better misunderstand its ...

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“Atmosphere, in a literal sense, isn’t formless. It’s a ball. Atmosphere then isn’t atmospheric — it doesn’t just ahistorically bob around out there around us. Atmosphere is the part of the past we can’t get back. Mary Hallock-Greenewalt’s machines for producing atmosphere can be technically dissected but the forms they produced can’t be recuperated. Atmosphere holds us like history cannot. We like to be held and we like history.” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations

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“Now, at this cusp of autumn, the point at which we prepare our fortitudes for relative seclusion, we feel compelled to ask whether fakeness is an insular tendency. Does work that cannot be disseminated, that puts nothing before something, create or address a public? Does nothing, as Lear admonished, come from nothing? We are heartened by the British Musicians’ Union, whose work argues otherwise (though we are wary of promoting any ideological bent that may appear in our research—we see fit to add: fakeness in music has no more of a mission than does music itself).” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations

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“It seems to us that the gravity of loss has to do with its degree of permanence. A lost key is not to be mourned long, as it is designed to be replaceable. A friend or lover is not. It would also seem that the great frustration of more serious loss is that the true deficit is unknown—some expected future is the truly lost thing. We observe now the ways in which a foreign policy measure brought about a quantifiable loss of natural resources and an unquantifiable loss of cultural ones. It is for us to point out this widespread ...

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“In his Natural History, Pliny criticizes the proverbial swan song for its accuracy. The idiom refers to the song swans purportedly sing upon their demise. Pliny objects however that swans don’t in fact sing upon their death or otherwise. Songs are slippery, Pliny’s bald repudiation notwithstanding. And fake songs slipperier still. Today we offer a few words not on avian but cetacean songs. These aren’t swan songs in the sense of finalities marked, but are indeed of a kind with swan songs in their being unsung.” —Fake Music Re-Anticipations

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PublisherAsia Art Archive2017
Solomon Benjamin and Wing Shing Tang, Hong Kong and Bangalore- based scholars of critical geography and urban studies led a set of workshops and walks in Framing Spatial Stories: Life Beyond the Plan, Survey, and Grid to consider the politics of contested urban settings through the lens of recent art of Asia.

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This set of five pamphlets documents a seminar given recently by Alexander R. Galloway at the Public School New York, a self-organizing educational program where class ideas are generated by the public. “French Theory Today” explores a new generation of French voices—Catherine Malabou, Bernard Stiegler, Mehdi Belhaj Kacem, Quentin Meillassoux, and François Laruelle—whose work has, to varying degrees, only recently emerged in the English-speaking world. Each night of the seminar consisted of a lecture followed by questions from and discussion with class participants. As Galloway suggests in the online class proposal, the goal was “not to set in aspic a new ...

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PublisherRadio Web Macba2014
Taking the term soundscape as a starting point, this essay by José Manuel Berenguer addresses a number of concerns relevant to understanding the listening experience within art and everyday life. Tackling questions such as phenomenology, cognition, new media, aesthetics and the overlap between art and science, Berenguer engages in a critical analysis of recent sound art practices, using both significant historical examples and his own experience. Intermedia artist, composer, teacher, curator… The many labels that can be applied to the career of José Manuel Berenguer (Barcelona, 1955) reflect the multidisciplinary drive that has always guided his professional activities. Aside from producing ...

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A bunch of no good commies and anarchists showing films about work and the struggles against it since November 2007. We are a London based collective who screens films once a month around the themes of work, non-work, refusal, struggle and more. We screen films in independent, self organised venues, all our screenings are free and sometimes we sit around afterwards chatting in front of a beer and a plate of pirogis. We’ve once summarised what we do like this: This activity has resulted in a research archive of films and texts that critically illuminate cinematic representations of labour, the shifting transformations of ...

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PublisherMikrotext2016
The number of representatives of digital publishing that Berlin has attracted in recent years is astonishing. Their lingua franca is a code that can be understood anywhere you go and is used across the world: the e-book code. As part of the Stadtsprachen Festival, taking place in Berlin in November 2016 and funded by the Hauptstadtkulturfonds, this reader look at what it is that constitutes this international digital voice. Four Berlin-based publisher-authors (Kathrin Passig of Techniktagebuch, Nikola Richter of mikrotext, Ansgar Warner of ebooknews, and Gregor Weichbrodt of 0x0a/Frohmann) share and discuss opinions, experiences, and challenges. In addition, four important ...

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PublisherMikrotext2016
Good-bye, rational culture! Let Guatemalan writer Alan Mills welcome you to the philosophy of tricksters. Follow him on a tour through indigenous mythology, classical education, and the literary canon, thoroughly mixed with hacking theory and with popular culture—from Star Wars and Breaking Bad to familiar figures like Bugs Bunny and El Zorro. Get to know Michael Jackson and David Bowie, Guy Fawkes and the Popol Vuh, the sacred book of the Maya-K’iche’, through this fulminant essay on old and new strategies for resisting superpowers. Mills currently lives in Berlin and Vienna, and Hacking Coyote is an expanded and elaborated version of ...

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The first bill proposed by freshman Congressman Jim Banks (Indiana’s 3rd) was the Visa Investigation and Social Media Act (VISA) of 2017, which would require visa applicants to turn over their social media accounts for vetting by the Department of Homeland Security, and allocates $60 million dollars to do so. Banks tweeted, “This is a common sense way to increase security and ensure those who wish to harm Americans cannot enter the U.S” even though its clear enough already that social media profiles will only reveal what a shrewd user wants it to. The bill has been referred to the ...

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More than ever, creative people find their attention pulled in many directions by digital and networked technologies. Staying up-to-date and responsive to so many forms of online communication often feels mandatory in order to keep working. But, it can be both exhausting and dispiriting to build a creative practice while “extremely online.” With this compilation of essays produced in collaboration with Are.na, the platform for connecting ideas, we asked artists to share their approaches to using the internet more mindfully and creatively.

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A book of theory, essays, stories, and poems released in association with the exhibition Hyperobjects at Ballroom Marfa, which explores the overwhelming scale of today’s ecological crisis.

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I Want a President: Transcript of a Rally documents a November 6th, 2016 reading on New York’s High Line. In advance of last year’s general election, the event convened artists, writers, and poets to reflect upon political leadership and community action in relation to Zoe Leonard’s text from 1992. Contributors include: Sharon Hayes, Zoe Leonard, Fred Moten & Stefano Harney, Wu Tsang, Morgan Bassichis, Mel Elberg, Malik Gaines, Alexandro Segade, Layli Long Soldier, Pamela Sneed, Eileen Myles, Justin Vivian Bond & Nath Ann Carrera. With thanks to: Dancing Foxes Press, Joseph Logan Design, High Line Art, Friends of the Highline, The Standard, Thea ...

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Herman Melville, Timothy J. Deines, Anthony Friedman
I am a rather elderly man. The nature of my avocations for the last thirty years has brought me into more than ordinary contact with what would seem an interesting and somewhat singular set of men, of whom as yet nothing that I know of has ever been written:—I mean the law-copyists or scriveners. I have known very many of them, professionally and privately, and if I pleased, could relate diverse histories, at which good-natured gentlemen might smile, and sentimental souls might weep. But I waive the biographies of all other scriveners for a few passages in the life of ...

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PublisherFall Semester2014
We are well aware of the limited strength of the left today. Trade unions have been decimated, working class solidarity torn apart, political parties mutated into neoliberal puppets, and social movements channelled into innocuous forms. An entire battery of tactics has been employed to put the left in this position of weakness: legal alterations, increased precarity, global competition, and so on. Yet class power can come from a variety of sources, and a main argument of this paper is that the current weakness of the left is not simply due to a lack of class consciousness, a breakdown of solidarity, or ...

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PublisherValand Academy2016
Feminist Pedagogies Working Group The work group was triggered by the desire to articulate and create space for a queer and feminist perspective on learning and teaching inside and outside of the art academy. It builds on and responds to the Critical Practices: Education from Arts and Artists Conference at Valand Academy (October 2015) and the Meaning Making Meaning exhibition at A-venue (March 2016) in Gothenburg. All students and staff at Valand Academy were invited to join this open work group. Over the past year we held lunchtime meetings, dinners at homes, met in bars or over skype, in our studios and ...

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Call me Ishmael. Some years ago — never mind how long ago precisely — having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen, and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth; …

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