Podcasts

PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation is the first of three recorded in Cairo about Cairo. Beth Stryker and Omar Nagati, through the description of their research and design work, introduce us to the post-revolution city and its multiple forms of informal architectures. We begin by evoking tbe numerous passage ways of Downtown and the work of Cluster to rehabilitate two of them. We then describe these forms of informality, the danger in romanticizing them — by systematically assuming that they advance the common good — and what can be learn from them. We then conclude by problematizing the act of cartographying what was not ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2016
This second conversation of the series complementing the latest issue of The Funambulist Magazine dedicated to Design & Racism borrows its title from Audre Lorde’s words cited by Mabel O. Wilson at the beginning of the “Critical Dialogues on Race and Modern Architecture” that she organized at Columbia University in February 2016. Throughout this discussion, we talk about architecture’s historical and contemporary contribution to the American structural racism against Black bodies. Professor Mabel O. Wilson teaches architectural design and history/theory courses at Columbia University’s GSAPP. She is also appointed as a Research Fellow at the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
The Dalieh of Raouche is a large publicly accessible rock situated at the extremity of West Beirut peninsula (see map and photos below). Like many coastal sites in Lebanon, it is currently the object of a private development plan, which tackles many questions about legal property, as well as social, ecological, and archaeological preservation. In December 2014, the Civil Campaign to Protect the Dalieh of Raouche wrote an open-letter to Rem Koolhaas, the master-planner of the project, in order to raise this questions in the public debate. This letter was shared at a scale that went beyond the sole city ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Alexander Weheliye is built upon the critique he made of the work of Giorgio Agamben, in particular in his essentialization of the muselmann in the context of the Holocaust. Alexander argues that slavery functions as a better paradigm to understand the “layering” of bare lives and the racial aspects that this understanding involves. He explains how he is interested in finding other ways to “claim humanity” than the traditional judicial one that attributes this status in a retroactive manner to suffering bodies. In order to do so, we evoke the works of major African-American and black Caribbean thinkers such as Hortense ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
Lucie Bacon and I had this conversation only a few days after she finished her second field trip in Bosnia-and-Herzegovina where her research took her to study the European Union politics of “externalization,” i.e. the ‘subcontracting’ of its (anti-)migration policies outside of the Shenghen Space. Lucie has visited some asylum centers, where numerous migrants wait to be granted their legal status, and detention centers, where migrant bodies are imprisoned prior to their expulsion. She collected numerous testimonies from migrants themselves, but also organizers, activists, administrative officials, etc. and tell us about them in this discussion. We also talk about her ...

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Mark Fell, Joe Gilmore, Connie Treanor, et alFlorian Hecker, Ryoji Ikeda
PublisherRadio Web Macba2010
Generative music is a term used to describe music which has been composed using a set of rules or system. This series of six episodes explores generative approaches (including algorithmic, systems-based, formalised and procedural) to composition and performance primarily in the context of experimental technologies and music practices of the latter part of the 20th Century and examines the use of determinacy and indeterminacy in music and how these relate to issues around control, automation and artistic intention. Each episode of this RWM series is followed by a special accompaniment programme of exclusive music by some of the leading sound artists ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation with May al-Ibrashy is the last one of a series of twelve recorded in the Levant and Egypt. In it, we discuss the current political situation of Egypt after the 2011 revolution and the 2013 military coup d’état. As she writes, “my new motto [is] if you’re not confused, you’re stupid.” Trying not to fall into stupidity, we thus attempt to question the various problems that creates such a confusion, in particular when it comes to heritage. In this regard, the fire at the Institut d’Egypte that burned thousands of documents in December 2011 is exemplary of a political ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation with Hana Sleiman begins a series of several around the Palestinian question(s). After evoking her archiving work of historical Arabic comic books and their construction of a political imaginary, Hana and I talk about this important construction of a Palestinian Oral History Archive at the American University of Beirut. This archive comprises about a thousand hours of interview with Palestinian having experienced the 1948 Nakba and its evictive violence. We particularly insist on the embraced subjectivities of such narratives, stressing that what is remembered and how it is remembered is more important than the illusory ambition of an ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
Paris’s Ecole Spéciale d’Architecture (ESA) is 150 years old this year. For the last two years however, this association’s current director, François Bouvard, has imposed a pedagogy and internal politics that is perceived by most students and teachers as profoundly conservative, if not despotic. In the beginning of April 2015, the firing of nine (unionized) members of the school administration has triggered a strike followed by the overwhelming majority of students, as well as many teachers, demanding the director’s resignation, the re-hiring of the nine fired members of the association, as well as a significant shift in the school’s pedagogy. In this conversation, ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
In this conversation, we discuss about Gustavo Ciriaco’s choreographic work in order to address the politics of movement of the body – what we commonly call “dance” – in the public space. As a base for this discussion, we particularly talk about his piece, entitled “Here whilst we walk,” which consists in inviting a group of people to walk silently in a city while being surrounded by an elastic rubber band. On the contrary of other conversations part of the Latin American podcast series, we remain relatively non-specific for most of the conversation, before finally addressing the specificity of the ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
For this podcast, I asked questions to Pamela Brown about the role of debt in American society and the way its very function has been historically affecting, and continues to affect the African-American community in particular. Debt should normally be understood as a mutually beneficial contract but has been transformed into yet another capitalist apparatus of profit making. It functions through an ideology of promise that ensures the conformity of life paths and the perpetuation in the future of the roles in the present society. Once the mechanisms that intertwines debt and race have been exposed, Pamela describes the work ...

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PublisherUrbanomic2018
Compiled by Philip Sanderson and mixed by DJ Huysmans, a mix made to accompany the Ballardian Breakfast Briefing virtual launch event for Applied Ballardianism.

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Hana Tajima and I recently sat down to talk about one aspect of her work as a fashion designer. Some of the clothing she designs have the particularity to incorporate the hijab (islamic veil) that currently suffers from an absolute lack of discursive complexity and contextualization. Our conversation is organized in such a way that we first describe the hijab only in its physical characteristics, as “a piece of clothe.” Once we have a grasp at its objectal properties, we then proceed to intensify it with the symbolic and political position it carries voluntarily and involuntarily within a given context. ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
In this conversation that occurred before her presentation at New York’s Left Forum, Tings Chak and I discuss about the historical and contemporary racialized treatment of migrant bodies in North America and Europe. Refused, expelled, marginalized, or detained, the migrant body is a precarious one. Through Ting’s upcoming graphic-essay book, we talk about carceral architecture, in particular the one that embodies the numerous migrant detention centers in Canada. What does that mean at a legal standpoint to be incarcerated not for punishing reasons but for administrative reasons? How does architecture unfold violence upon bodies through its very physicality? What would ...

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dos
Sarah Demeuse, Goda Budvytyte, Asger Behncke Jacobsen, et alSeth Cluett, Ana Salazar, Annie Godfrey Larmon, Shannon Harvey, Staci Bu Shea, Emily Smith, Juana Berrío, Joseph del Pesco, [15 More...]
dos focuses on conversations in, about, and with exhibitions. dos commissions and edits conversations between two visitors to an exhibition to emphasize subjective experience and meaning-making at large. dos conversations can be streamed, followed as an RSS feed, or accessed as a podcast. dos conjures their listeners as eavesdroppers and vicarious visitors who experience exhibitions on their own time, partaking in a continuum of physical experience and shared interpersonal thinking. dos is catalyzed by Sarah Demeuse, designed by Goda Budvytyte, and programmed by Asger Behncke Jacobsen. Audio is developed with Seth Cluett. dos voices are: Staci Bu Shea, Shannon Harvey, Annie Godfrey Larmon, ...

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Publisherdos-dos.org2017
dos focuses on conversations in, about, and with exhibitions. dos commissions and edits conversations between two visitors to an exhibition to emphasize subjective experience and meaning-making at large. dos conversations can be streamed, followed as an RSS feed, or accessed as a podcast. dos conjures their listeners as eavesdroppers and vicarious visitors who experience exhibitions on their own time, partaking in a continuum of physical experience and shared interpersonal thinking.

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Publisherdos-dos.org2017
dos focuses on conversations in, about, and with exhibitions. dos commissions and edits conversations between two visitors to an exhibition to emphasize subjective experience and meaning-making at large. dos conversations can be streamed, followed as an RSS feed, or accessed as a podcast. dos conjures their listeners as eavesdroppers and vicarious visitors who experience exhibitions on their own time, partaking in a continuum of physical experience and shared interpersonal thinking.

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Publisherdos-dos.org2017
dos focuses on conversations in, about, and with exhibitions. dos commissions and edits conversations between two visitors to an exhibition to emphasize subjective experience and meaning-making at large. dos conversations can be streamed, followed as an RSS feed, or accessed as a podcast. dos conjures their listeners as eavesdroppers and vicarious visitors who experience exhibitions on their own time, partaking in a continuum of physical experience and shared interpersonal thinking.  

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Publisherdos-dos.org2017
This episode of dos was recorded in The Classroom during the New York Art Book Fair, September 2017. dos focuses on conversations in, about, and with exhibitions. dos commissions and edits conversations between two visitors to an exhibition to emphasize subjective experience and meaning-making at large. dos conversations can be streamed, followed as an RSS feed, or accessed as a podcast. dos conjures their listeners as eavesdroppers and vicarious visitors who experience exhibitions on their own time, partaking in a continuum of physical experience and shared interpersonal thinking.

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Publisherdos-dos.org2018
Curator Juana Berrío and artist Delcy Morelos visit the Gold Museum in Bogotá, which houses the world’s largest collection of pre-conquest gold artifacts. They talk about the cultural differences of valuing gold objects, highlighting intrinsic, economic, ceremonial or environmental aspects; the uses of plants with power; the poporo; human-animal bodies; and how to overcome the muteness of those distant objects made by eradicated ethnicities.

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Nick Caverly received me in Detroit a day after I arrived in the city whose population and economy has been drastically shrinking for the last decades and is now populated with a multitude of ruins and empty lots. We discuss about the governance of the city that is now piloted by an “Emergency Finance Manager,” who reduced public service to a worrisome level, mostly detrimental to the most impoverished populations of the city. We also talk of the newcomers in the city, the white “creative class,” which, despite a commendable optimism tends to develop an imaginary that omit the existence ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Michelle Murphy is divided into two parts: BIOPOLITICAL FEMINISM: The first part introduces Foucault’s concept of biopolitics and applies it to forms of economization of life particularly in relation to female bodies. Paraphrasing Foucault, Michelle affirms that governmental capitalism needs for “some must not to be born so that future others will live more consumptibly, productively in the logic of macro-economy .” She thus unfolds the political history of regulation and ‘marketing’ of reproduction and contraception that organizes such an economization of life at a scale of a population. Further, we discuss of Michelle’s concept, “The Girl” as the problematic current vessel of ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2013
Lucy and I start this conversation around the legal strategies at work in contemporary India. Between the eminent domain, legal reminiscence of the colonial era used by state-backed developers, and the immanent domain that informal settlements constitute for their own survival in the city, we discuss about how law and its spatial practices can be used as political strategies. We also evoke William Burroughs’s fictitious territory of the Interzone as the place of suspension of the law, the thickness of the diagrammatic line designed by legal architects, a liminal space where one can deliberately inhabit, but where others are forced into. Lucy completed ...

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