Columbus College of Art & Design

Cover art
“An Argument about Beauty” by American writer and cultural theorist Susan Sontag serves as a basis for examining relationships between contemporary art and a historical responsibility for painting to portray beauty through representation. Calling Beauty is organized around four conventional pillars of reflection: still life, landscape, nude and portraiture. It includes work that draws on these traditional genres and their associations with beauty only to emphasize the retreat from that tradition and thus renewed engagements with a history of art and painting today. Sontag’s essay is reprinted in full in this book.
Cover art
Consumption Junction is about the paradoxical intersection of environmentally sustainable activity and daily acts of consumption. The works of art gathered together for this exhibition and book share a conceptual language that addresses a range of topics from excessive spending, pollution, and urban infrastructure to alternative transportation, suburban sprawl, and recycling. They offer insightful cultural criticisms and whimsical, imaginative alternatives set somewhere between reality and fiction. In all cases they suggest the need for a worldwide environmental movement that responds to our ecologically precarious moment.
Cover art
Descent to Revolution draws on a discourse of revolutionary action, revolutionary language and revolutionary theory to thread together and situate revolution in the present moment. It features interviews, commissioned texts and work by five international artist collectives that use urban spaces and social spheres as primary means of engagement. It examines how slow, incremental shifts in social behavior generate knowledge and action that lead to long-term changes in how we engage with one another and our environments. The publication includes a commissioned text by Claire Fontaine and extensive interviews with Red76 and REINIGUNGSESELLSCHAFT.
Cover art
Exact Imagination is about the experience of art, however one may have it, via gallery exhibitions, social encounters, books, reproductions, academics, or simply by being alive. Taking its inspiration and title from the Frankfurt School philosopher Theodor Adorno and his analysis of aesthetic experience in which he argues that subjective and objective forces collide to determine a viewer’s perceptual reception of art—how it makes them feel, what they take away from it, what they draw up inside of them to relate to it—it includes art that encourages both concrete and immaterial aesthetic explorations. With this in mind, Exact Imagination investigates the ...
Cover art
The New Administration of a Fine Arts Education features interviews with leading individuals in contemporary art who convey an urgency to consider issues of distribution in relation to sustainable livelihoods for artists. Discussions address ways of making art and exhibitions within the conditions at hand, creating new economic outlets of dissemination and inspiring a need to dispense with notions of the solitary artist working in a studio, relying on “someone” to “discover” them. Harnessing means of distribution in some cases is both content and functioning source of income of this work.
Cover art
Of Other Spaces asks us to consider the ways in which spaces are charged with authority, and both serve and suppress our actions and ways of relating. It follows within a discourse on the sociocultural conditions embedded in different spaces, institutional and otherwise. The concept of “other spaces” is inspired by the philosophy of Michel Foucault, from his 1967 essay, Of Other Spaces, Heterotopias, on the social relations and cultural conditions associated with the weight of space, architecture, and history. Foucault’s essay is reprinted in this book.
Cover art
Seventh Dream of Teenage Heaven seeks to generate ideas about contemporary life in the wake of postmodernism. It explores these issues in relation to how the passage of time once evident in the material residues of our culture has given way technology, social media and consumerism that change the way we perceive to time. The essay takes the form of a three-act play and prologue that combines parts of seminal texts by leading theorists on postmodernism, a pastiche that shapes a fictional conversation⎯itself performing the very ideas addressed by the publication. The book has original musical scores with lyrics drawn from Orwell’s 1984.
Cover art
Taking Shelter presents projects and interventions that examine the human desire for appropriate shelter as a place of ownership, a place to call one’s own. The works in this book demonstrate how community, government, economics, and politics are interwoven with and sometimes inextricably linked to the dreams and expectations of having a personal place where one can take shelter.

We use cookies to improve your experience on our site. Read our privacy policy to learn more. Accept

Join Our Mailing List