The Avery Review

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PublisherThe Avery Review2017
Rebecca Choi revisits the legacy of the Black Panthers in All Power to the People; Wade Cotton and Isabelle Kirkham-Lewitt probe people-producing machines; Robin Hartanto Honggare traces the policing of political assembly in Singapore; and Nicole Lambrou questions what is sustained at Hudson Yards.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2017
Jordan Geiger tracks technologies of incarceration; Joy Knoblauch speculates on the possibility of designing discomfort; and the Architecture Lobby responds to the AIA with an essay from Peggy Deamer, Keefer Dunn, and Manuel Shvartzberg Carrió.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2017
Karen Abrams attempts to dislodge “placemaking” from architectural vocabularies; Galen Pardee reports on Myanmar’s new capital; and Camila Reyes Alé weighs the possibility of a dissident practice in architecture.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2017
Shelby Doyle and Leslie Forehand argue for the “spinster” as a figure of feminist digital craft; Adam Longenbach surveys the “sixth façade” and the architecture of the aerial view; Shota Vashakmadze contemplates the sod house on the prairie; and Joseph M. Watson asks the question of who Frank Lloyd Wright’s “Usonia” was designed for.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2017
Kevin Block takes a Harvard-designed online course on architectural theory; Brendan Cormier watches Frank Gehry’s MasterClass; and Yuki Higashino moves through episodes of Martin Beck’s Program.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2017
Joe Day constructs a discursive map of Hal Foster’s Bad New Days; Swarnabh Ghosh reevaluates planetary urbanization and rurality; Jacob R. Moore disputes CLOG’s latest issue on guns; and N. Claire Napawan, Ellen Burke, and Sahoko Yui argue for an ecofeminist approach to sustainability.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2017
Nicholas Gamso responds to Bansky’s appropriation of Basquiat; Sarah Hirschman visits Columbus and watches Columbus; Albert José-Antonio López asks for whom LACMA’s Found in Translation is translated; and Samaneh Moafi investigates Kayson Inc.’s production of housing in Iran, Venezuela, and Iraq.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2018
Peder Anker and Nina Edwards Anker review Design Earth’s Geostories; Amelia Borg and Timothy Moore follow grey nomads in Australia; Shaka McGlotten takes their turn at intergenerational queer pedagogies; and Hamed Khosravi broadcasts from the world’s smallest micro-nation.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2018
Maroš Krivý and Leonard Ma reassess the livability of Jan Gehl’s livable city; Lina Malfona circles the origins of Apple architecture; Silas Martí tracks the fate of Lina Bo Bardi’s contested Teatro Oficina; and Ife Vanable evaluates the middle in two Mitchell-Lama projects.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2018
Tizziana Baldenebro confronts the undervaluation of critical black female art and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s inclusionary curatorial practices; Elsa Hoover investigates the violent intersection of resource extraction, land ownership, and tribal sovereignty in the “man camp”; Kahira Ngige speculates on the megachurch and the urban implications of ecclesiastical architecture in Nairobi; and Sajdeep Soomal situates family history within the colonial orders of Ontario and the Punjab.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2018
Óskar Örn Arnórsson dives into an alliance between fish and soccer at the start of the 2018 World Cup; Jordan H. Carver questions the point of the border wall as a design project; Patrick Linder meditates on the possibilities of designing “shalom”; Leah Meisterlin dismantles representations of the city #AfterRikers; and Lola San Miguel journeys along the main artery of a twenty-first-century colony.
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PublisherThe Avery Review2018
Tei Carpenter zeroes in on what’s at stake in Designing Waste; Mimi Cheng choreographs a pas de deux between the Schindler House and Gerard + Kelly’s Modern Living; our 2018 Editorial Fellow Imani Day calls for “instigative design” in Detroit public schools; and Kevin Gotkin exposes the ableism at the heart of Heatherwick’s Vessel.

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