Thinkbelt

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PublisherThinkbelt2020
At a time when resources are under great pressure, waste is one of the few resources that is growing rather than shrinking. Kate O’Neill inventories the different forms and surprising itineraries of waste, and explains how this challenges our understanding of global governance.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
Why do we participate, and what is that experience really like? Anthropologist Christopher Kelty traces different ways that participation has been formatted across the twentieth century, and, as new technologies obscure the meaning of the concept, considers its potential.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
Architects, planners, and construction firms from socialist Eastern Europe shaped the urbanization of West Africa and the Middle East during the Cold War in ways we had not, until now, considered. Łukasz Stanek examines the strategic ambitions and sometimes contradictory motivations behind this global cooperation.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
Urban environments are built with materials that come from particular places and have a multitude of other relationships. What kinds of stories can their movement tell us? Landscape architect Jane Hutton follows five materials used in New York City landscapes over the last 150 years back to their source.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
As the global mining industry is remade by the logistics revolution and new technologies, and as East-Asian economies emerge as the pivot of international trade, extractive processes reach far beyond the confines of the shaft or the pit. Martín Arboleda charts these extended supply chains and highlights the potential for political struggle.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
Tracing the evolution of aided self-help housing in Peru over three decades beginning in the 1950s, Helen Geiger contemplates how this hands-on model for improving squatter settlements persisted under different political regimes, competing ideological agendas, and strained expert-resident relations.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
Digital technologies have transformed the geography of carceral space, augmenting older forms of racial criminalization via software and dispersed sensors. Brian Jefferson tracks the history of computing in the American criminal justice system.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
What would an ideal internet experience be like? Joanne McNeil explores the 30-year history of online life—the communities and identities and hazards—and imagines how we, the users, might recover some of the potential of our technologies.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
How do we transition to solar power while avoiding the disproportionate impacts we see with our energy systems today? Dustin Mulvaney highlights some of the social and environmental consequences of scaling up the solar industry.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
The Roland Park Company, which developed Baltimore’s wealthiest, whitest neighborhoods starting in the 1890s, had by the middle of the twentieth century an outsize influence on real estate professionals and on local and federal housing policy. Historian Paige Glotzer examines how racial exclusion structured the U.S. housing market.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
Modern maritime transportation and the movement of cargo has transformed harbors, ports, and cityscapes, but also social and political relations. Laleh Khalili discusses what it means to tell the story of shipping and capitalism in the Arabian Peninsula without neglecting the people that make it possible.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
The landscape along the US-Mexico border has been manipulated and altered over the past 150 years in an effort to control not only people but also animals, goods, and water. C.J. Alvarez details the history of construction along the international divide.

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