Art Photography

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This sourcebook is a gathering of documentation on the labeling of all the materials that have gone into the exhibition Blind Sensorium. Il paradosso dell’Antropocene in Matera at the “Domenico Ridola” National Museum of Archaeology and in the spaces of the former “Alessandro Volta” school, from 6 September 2019 to 8 March 2020. The photographic images – which for the installation in Basilicata have been reproduced and printed in A4 and A3 format on specially prepared panels – are joined on these pages by the reproduction of materials contained in the “Domenico Ridola” Museum, which we have chosen as an integral ...
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PublisherAperture Foundation2014
Core Curriculum: Writings on Photography is the long-awaited collection of essays, reviews, and lectures—some of which have gained a cult following online—by Tod Papageorge, one of the most influential voices in photography today. As the Walker Evans Professor of Photography at Yale University School of Art, Papageorge has shaped the work of generations of artist/photographers, and earned a reputation as an unusually eloquent guide to the work of many important figures in twentieth-century photography. Among the artists Papageorge discusses in this essential volume are Atget, Brassaï, Robert Frank (with Walker Evans), Robert Adams, and his close friend, Garry Winogrand. The ...
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PublishersMottoChert Gallery2013
A conversation between David Horvitz with David Senior.
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PublisherDroste Effect2018
“I have been photographing myself since 1982. If I fail to take a picture on a given day, I advance the film one frame so no image is recorded. This visual calendar consists of 2,500+ photographs that include my body from head to toe, as well as my environment. On occasion, I insert digital reenactment files to contrast with specific images or add an old family photograph for more context. Most often I’m by myself in these straightforward images, but sometimes I’m with family and friends. As time passes, births, deaths, celebrations, and bad days happen. Pets come and go, fashions ...
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PublisherAperture Foundation2018
In the late 1950s, the Limelight gallery and coffeehouse was the intellectual hangout of Greenwich Village, if not New York. It drew patrons and critics with ten shows per year, featuring the work of such figures as Minor White, Arnold Newman, Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Brassaï, Julia Margaret Cameron, and Robert Frank. When Limelight opened in 1954, it was the first commercial gallery in the US devoted exclusively to photography; along with the Museum of Modern Art, it became the most important venue for serious photography in the city. Helen Gee: Limelight, a Greenwich Village Photography Gallery and Coffeehouse in ...
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PublisherLink Editions2013
Damiano Nava likes to use the camera as a diary. After moving to Berlin, in November 2009, he found it hard to spontaneously meet people of his generation who might be interested in being photographed. He didn’t speak German, and it was hard for him to establish the kind of intimate relationship required for the project. “I was like someone having problems finding a soulmate, so it seemed like a natural step to turn to the internet”, he writes in his introduction. He wrote an ad and posted it on Craigslist and Exberliner. For about two years, the ad generated ...
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Publisheronestar press2010
“And I am always reaching to tune in, and so I’m always trying to tune out, conceptually trying to have a dialed in output that mirrors these beliefs, these ways of seeing, ways of believing, ways of doubting, and ways to relate. I have pure love and I have pure loss, and they both fill me up. I have always had time, it tips out the top of my cap every morning and every night, it can be frustrating and explosive, a nascent place in which we all live, and expressive understanding is the biggest pursuit. These photographs are from ...
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PublisherAperture Foundation2013
Photography After Frank, a page-turning look at contemporary photography by New York Times writer and former picture editor Philip Gefter, takes Robert Frank’s pivotal 1950s photographs as its starting point. Charting the medium’s trajectory through a variety of genres and practices, Gefter postulates that photography post-Frank has created a paradox: While the photographic image has brought us to a heightened awareness of the world around us, the constant representation of who we are has conspired against our natural state of innocence. Gefter begins with Robert Frank’s challenge to photography’s formal objectivity with the grainy, off-handed spontaneity of The ...
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Photomediations: A Reader offers a radically different way of understanding photography. The concept of photomediations that unites the twenty scholarly and curatorial essays collected here cuts across the traditional classification of photography as suspended between art and social practice in order to capture the dynamism of the photographic medium today. It also explores photography’s kinship with other media – and with us, humans, as media. The term ‘photomediations’ brings together the hybrid ontology of ‘photomedia’ and the fluid dynamism of ‘mediation’. The framework of photomediations adopts a process- and time-based approach to images by tracing the technological, biological, cultural, social and political ...
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PublisherLink Editions2012
Released on the occasion of the presentation of the exhibition Collect the WWWorld. The Artist as Archivist in the Internet Age at 319 Scholes, New York (October 18–November 4, 2012), this book presents Ryan Trecartin’s series of prints “A Lossless Fall 2010” together with its background documentation, in order to allow the reader to better get into an iconic, seminal piece of contemporary art. In November 2010, Ryan Trecartin published in the fashion and design magazine “W” the portraits of four of his long time collaborators: Lizzie Fitch, Veronica Gelbaum, Telfar Clemens, and Ashland Mines. The group was titled “A ...
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The first episode of Seeing is Forgetting! I speak with John about his studio practice, his family influencing the work he makes, and how success can complicate friendships.
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PublisherTriple Canopy2010
Artist Erin Shirreff’s motivation for developing Shadow, Glare, the first work she’s designed for a digital environment, stems from those moments when the screen’s material presence becomes impossible to ignore, when dust accumulations, errant smudges, and the movement of shadows and glares disturb the illusion of transparency. “In my living room the light will shift,” Shirreff explains, “and suddenly I’ll be looking at all the dust on my computer screen, or the splotches of light. That will really jar me back into my chair.” Originally from the article Shadow, Glare.

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