Conceptual Art

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Publisheronestar press2005
149 business cards has great meaning to me as it attempts to do several things at once. First, it functions as a kind of self-portrait or autobiography through the people I’ve met and places I have visited. Though, it must be noted only a certain type of people and merchants create & carry business cards. I have met or visited almost everyone or businesses in this book except maybe one or two. So in this way it is a kind of timeline or map to my past. It is very honest. In a more obvious way it serves as an address book. ...
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“18 PARIS IV.70” was an exhibition organized by Michel Claura in Paris in 1970. Held at a temporary space on Rue Mouffetard that April, it was accompanied by this trilingual publication (in English, French, and German), edited by Claura and published and distributed by Seth Siegelaub. Claura invited a group of artists to each contribute a work to the exhibition. Having collected a series of artist proposals, Claura then sent this collection to each of the participants, after which they were allowed to change their initial plans. This publication includes a preface and a postface by Claura and a two-part entry ...
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An Anti-Catalog was the work of the Catalog Committee of the group Artists Meeting for Cultural Change (AMCC). A landmark publication of the 1970s, its purpose was to protest the Whitney Museum of American Art’s bicentennial exhibition, which was titled “Three Centuries of American Art.” The Whitney show featured John D. Rockefeller III’s collection of mainly eighteenth and nineteenth-century American art–a collection that featured only one African American and one woman artist. The Catalog Committee, which consisted of fifteen artists and two art historians, spent almost a year producing an eighty-page book containing articles and documents. Originally conceived as a critique ...
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Developed through conversations with members of the art world and written with the help of lawyer Robert Projansky in 1971, Seth Siegelaub’s Artist’s Reserved Rights Transfer And Sale Agreement was designed to safeguard the economic interests of artists, particularly in the case of an artwork’s resale, reproduction, or rental. Intended to serve as an accessible document for all artists, the contract was written in an easily comprehensible style and was widely distributed through art journals and magazines—characteristics shared by much of the artwork Siegelaub was currently representing. Since its publication in English, French, German, and Italian, the document has been ...
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This catalogue was published in conjunction with a group exhibition curated by Seth Siegelaub at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada in 1969. The exhibition took place throughout the university, with a number of works distributed or announced via the school’s communication’s facilities (university mail, a student newspaper, etc). As part of the exhibition, a symposium was held by way of a “conference line” telephone hook-up, with some of the participating artists calling in from Burnaby, Ottawa and New York. The catalogue was made available only after the exhibition was over. The participating artists were Terry Atkinson, Michael Baldwin, Robert ...
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Publisheronestar press2003
“That of which there is no trace does not enter into the equation,” reads one of the central panels in DEEP BLUE SKY / LIGHT BLUE SKY. This is a book of traces – linguistic, symbolic, photographic – and the equations in which they arrange and rearrange themselves like so many limbs in a love triangle.
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PublisherMitchell F. Chan2017
Digital Zones of Immaterial Pictorial Sensibility is a non-fungible token artwork, first minted on August 30, 2017 at InterAccess in Toronto. The artwork is significant not only for being one of the earliest NFT artworks to be exhibited and minted in a legacy art gallery, but also for imagining, in 2017, the ways that non-fungible tokens could advance the conceptualist project of separating the commodity form of an artwork from the experienced form. It also explored the ways the separation changes a collector’s relationship to art. The Digital Zones tell a story about how different concepts of ownership are fundamental to the experience of an artwork. The ...
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Documents 1 is a collection of correspondence, press, and ephemera surrounding the foundation and rise of the Art Worker’s Coalition (AWC), first published at the height of the group’s activity in mid-1969. Beginning with a rallying statement from Greek sculptor Takis—whose withdrawal from an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) that January directly precipitated the formation of the AWC—the publication is a whirlwind tour of the flourishing group’s rapid development and expanding concerns. Alongside official statements, fliers, and lists of demands from the AWC, its offshoots, affiliates, and enemies-of-enemies—from Marcel Broodthaers to the Black Emergency Cultural Coalition—Documents 1 includes ...
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PublisherPrimary Information2012
The Early History of Avalanche chronicles the conception and production of Avalanche magazine between 1968-1972, as well as the artistic milieu from which it emerged and to which it bore unsurpassed witness, through a tapestry of firsthand accounts. Founding editors Liza Bear and Willoughby Sharp describe the magazine’s production in detail (the period in question saw the publication of its first six issues) and critically reflect on the artistic trends and movements of the time, to which their legendary publication was devoted and to which it served as a vital outlet. Described by its creators as “a cross between a ...
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PublisherOnCurating.org2021
Although the Fluxus art (non-)movement is often read as a historical phenomenon, the breadth of its innovations and complexities actively thwarts linear and circumscribed viewpoints. The notion of Fluxus incorporates contradiction in challenging and enduringly generative ways. More than five decades after its emergence, this special issue of OnCurating entitled Fluxus Perspectives seeks to re-examine the influence, roles, and effects of Fluxus via a wide range of scholarly perspectives. The editors Martin Patrick and Dorothee Richter asked notable writers from different locations, generations, and viewpoints, all of whom having written about Fluxus before, to offer their thoughts on its significance, ...
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PublisherAcademy Editions2016
In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Fluxus—the international laboratory of art, architecture, design and music—Swinburne University of Technology has released a free digital copy of The Fluxus Reader. Fluxus began in the 1950s as a loose, international community of artists, architects, composers and designers. By the 1960s, Fluxus had become a laboratory of ideas and an arena for artistic experimentation in Europe, Asia and the United States. Described as “the most radical and experimental art movement of the 1960s,” Fluxus has challenged conventional thinking on art and culture for half a century. Fluxus artists had a central role in the birth ...
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PublisherGauss PDF2012
In 1970, the artist John Baldessari publicly cremated all the work he had made in the previous thirteen years. A year later, in 1971, John Baldessari created “I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art”, in which John Baldessari videotaped himself writing the sentence “I will not make any more boring art” on a piece of white paper until the tape ran out. He used his left hand and a lead pencil to write twenty-seven iterations of this promise while the tape ran for approximately thirteen minutes. This act was also iterated as an outsourced collaboration with students at the Nova ...

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