Historiography

PublisherIrena Haiduk2013
Two figures go out into this world and traverse it: the explorer and the imposter. The explorer stands on terra firma, surveying the horizon that magnetically pulls him. Sometimes Fernweh (in German, “yearning for the faraway”) produces an explorer who never returns, but his traveling is still made possible by the knowledge that he could return at any time. e image of the explorer appends a few basic corollaries to the nature of the Western image and the way it renders history. is Western image is weightless, infinitely thin, hovering above everything, including history. It is reproducible on all channels, ...

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PublisherSALT2015
Becoming Istanbul is a critical dictionary exploring the problematics of Istanbul. Made up of 152 entries focusing on transformations to the city, clichés used by observers to evaluate these transformations, and commonplace complaints and conditions, Becoming Istanbul invites the reader to question and critique popular discourses. This collection of original writings, seeking to examine Istanbul from different perspectives, has brought together a diverse selection of writers, including architects, musicians, urban planners, orchestral conductors, activists, sociologists, economists, film critics, authors, museum directors, geographers, reporters, anthropologists and historians.

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PublisherAshkal Alwan2014
A DIALOGUE ON MARGINAL GEOLOGY This dialogue was developed during Home Workspace Program 2013-14, at Ashkal Alwan – Beirut, Lebanon, 2014.

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Publishere-flux2018
Some time around 1882, God was pronounced dead. For certain Russian thinkers of the era, this loss provided a building opportunity: where the place of one god closes, space for another one opens. Unlike most established schools of thought, Russian cosmism does not present a singular vision, a consistent epistemology, or a unified theory. On the contrary: the ideas of its nineteenth- to early-twentieth-century protagonists are often so divergent and contradictory that they appear incoherent, paradoxical, or delirious. Russian cosmism’s known scientists, philosophers, and writers have been understood to include figures ranging from Nikolai Fedorov, the nineteenth-century librarian who aimed to ...

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PublisherMagnum Photos2016
Europa is a book created by a group of Magnum photographers and journalists who have been covering both the refugee crisis in Europe and the many contexts across the Middle East, Asia, and Africa that gave rise to these migrations. This book is launched in partnership with the Arab Fund for Arts and Culture (AFAC) as the first project under its special program, the Arab European Creative Platform. The book harnesses the collective energy, skills and resources of its contributors to create Europa, a collaborative and independent book, the first of its kind intended for practical use by migrants and ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation is the first one of an Archipelago series in the Western Balkans. Recorded in Sarajevo with Selma Porobić, it introduces the historical context of the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the ethnic cleansing of the Bosniak population by the Serbian militias, and the 2 millions displaced people inside and outside the country. Twenty years after the Dayton Peace Agreements, many refugees have not yet returned, often because of local and regional strategies discouraging if not preventing this return. The second part of the conversation addresses the geographical position of the Western Balkans, at the gates of “Fortress Europe,” where many ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
We begin this podcast with Bhakti Shringarpure introducing the online journal Warscapes that she founded. The discussion that follows emerges from an original unsuspected dialogue between two articles Bhakti and I wrote in Summer 2012, when Ansar Dine destroyed several Sufi mausoleums and precious manuscripts in Timbuktu. Bhakti had then put back into political and historical context and compared such “rage against the monuments” (see below) with the writings of Georges Bataille about the take of the Bastille, considered as the beginning of the 1789 French revolution. In my own article, I had attempted to show how both iconoclasts and iconodules are considered as such ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Naomi Paik exposes the arguments she develops in her forthcoming book currently entitled Rightlessness (2015). In it, she uses three historical examples of camps administrated by the United States in their efforts of manufacturing rightlessness for bodies it wants to exclude from traditional judicial channels. We begin the conversation by talking of the logic behind the late 1980s discussion about symbolical and financial reparations to Japanese American citizens who had been incarcerated in the infamous camps from 1942 to 1945. Naomi then describes the legal and physical existence of a camp in Guantanamo holding HIV positive refugees having fled the ...

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PublisherHalmos2010
Written in 1733, Memoirs of the Twentieth Century is widely regarded to contain the earliest known conception of time-travel and, in particular, the first cognitive leap that would allow for a historicized image of the present as seen from the point of view of a distant future. Intriguingly, it is the text itself which is claimed to have traveled back in time and Madden has used this conceit to satirize his own period – tracing out its bureaucratic absurdities into a strange yet pointed vision of the late 20th century: a world politically fraught, overwhelmed with corruption and struggling to ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
In this conversation, Derek Gregory shares with us a few aspects of his simultaneously broad and precise knowledge of the ways war function. We examine together the current so-called “war on terror” in which the United States and their allies have engaged since 2001. Derek distinguishes three spaces that need to be produced in order for war to operate physically and apparently legitimately. We first consider a drone as an object crystalizing both the paradigm of contemporary war, but also the vessel of all wrongly posed questions that perpetuate the status quo. All disciplines are mobilized for war: geography, technology, architecture, law, ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
As discussed in the previous conversation with Alejandro Grimson, Argentina is built on a myth of Europeanness, thus concealing its indigenity from its national narrative. This conversation with Axel Lazzari introduces us to the historical and current political situations of the indigenous populations in Argentina. We begin by addressing the very terminology we use and the power of naming as a means of control. Axel then provides us with a short account of the European colonization of the indigenous land, subsequently enforced by the mapping of the territory. We look at the three historical maps below to understand the controlled ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2013
Every publishing house constructs an editorial line of its own. Sometimes it has to do with the topic, sometimes with a question, sometimes with the authors… In the case of punctum books however, the editorial line is to be found in the failure of the book it publishes to properly take place into a given academic category. The manifesto that lies behind such choice is the topic of the conversation I had with Eileen. The not-so-well-known (at least for me) medieval era meets the scheme of the archipelago dear to this platform, as we imagined together a non-institutionalized university where ...

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… unfolds an itinerant encounter with nineteenth-century European naturalists in the Malay world, where the theory of evolution by natural selection emerged alongside less celebrated concerns about mass extinction and climate change; by re-considering the reverse hallucinatory condition of colonial science in the tropics—how scientists learned to not see what was manifestly present—the reader-as-exhibition-viewer may exhume from the remains of this will to knowledge an ethical conviction of particular relevance for confronting forms of neocolonization in the Anthropocene.

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PublisherShifter2008
Most libraries around the world use the Dewey Decimal Classification System (DDCS) to list and categorize books. e DDCS is a library classification system developed by Melvil Dewey in 1876. By categorizing items within a library it serves as a tool for people searching for specific knowledge. It was an attempt to organize all knowledge into ten main classes, which are further subdivided into 100 divisions and 1000 sections. is makes the DDCS appear purely numerical and infinitely rational. However, DDCS is regularly revised, reflecting how culture, ideology, and the perception of knowledge change over time. As a result of ...

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PublisherShifter2008
While stranded in Dublin, Ohio on September 13th 2001 due to the grounding of all domestic flights in the US, the editors visited the local library. umbing through the card catalogue, they found a reference to “Other Possibilities,” by Indira Sylvia (I.S.) Belissop assigned the Dewey Decimal call number 125.20. Let alone the book, even this curious number inserted between “Teleology” (124) and “ e Self” (126) has since been impossible to find in major libraries around the world. e book itself did not appear on the shelf, and the card, in classic Courier font, stated simply, “Collected writings of ...

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PublisherRabRab Press2014
Published in Tbilisi, in 2014, Sezgin Boynik’s Still Stealing Steel is historical-materialist study of avant-garde zaum language. The book actualises the most radical and subversive promises of Futurist zaum experiments made at the beginning of XX century in Russia and Georgia.

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation is the last one from the series of podcasts recorded on the US/Canadian West Coast. Kamal Arora brings us to Delhi where the research for her dissertation is set. From an introduction about female bodies navigating at risk in the public space, we focus more specifically on one space, called ‘the widow colony.’ The widows are women who saw their husbands killed during the 1984 massacre against the Sikh population consequently from the assassination of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi. Together, we examine how the physicality of this urban village partially determine the politics of its daily organization and ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Sophia Azeb is the first of a series recorded along the American and Canadian West Coast. Sophia and I talk about our frustrations to see the lack of imagination offered by the “solutions” (a highly problematic term) often given to end what remains problematic to call “the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.” In opposition to the traditional “two-state solution” and “one-state solution,” Sophia proposes a “no-state solution,” that refuses the recognition of any property on the land and thus, state-sovereignty. We talk about the land being practiced by the bodies, and the bodies being fragments of the land, through a ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
In this podcast, Renisa Mawani introduces her current work that uses the migrant ship Komagata Maru to address migration within its legal and temporal dimensions. We then continue this conversation by examining the arguments she made in the 2012 article “Law’s Archive,” which examines the available means to archive law within the collective narrative that the archive constitute. This means are politically and physically determined in such a way that the indigenous contribution — not always textual for instance — to this collective narrative cannot fully take part in it. This conversation has therefore for goal to challenge the way we commonly understand ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with social anthropologist Alejandro Grimson articulates the concept of border both at a philosophical level and at a local level through few South American cases that he studied in the past. What does it mean to have a bridge joining two countries together? How about when it is an avenue that almost invisibly separates two countries? For Alejandro, borders as such are not against what we need to fight, but rather their means of implementation. In the second part of the conversation, we ‘zoom in’ Buenos Aires to observe how the Argentinean capital is also full of borders ...

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PublisherThe Funamblist2014
In early May, Gastón Gordillo received me at the University of British Columbia, which allowed us to talk about his upcoming book, Rubble: The Afterlife of Destruction, as well as the essay “Nazi Architecture as Affective Weapon” written for The Funambulist Papers series. We talk about the politics of ruins from Albert Speer’s plans for Third Reich Berlin that was meant to generate glorious ruins to the different types of ruins that exist at the foot of the Andes in North Argentina. There, in contrast to the attitude by local authorities, local people do not view ruins as historic relics that should ...

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PublisherLibrary Stack2018
A conversation between Library Stack and Sam Hardy, a British archaeologist who tracks the black market trade in illicit antiquities. Working from London and Rome, Hardy studies Conflict Antiquities: that’s everything from the looting of ancient objects at unguarded archaeological sites, to thefts from national museum collections, to the anonymous finds of amateurs with metal detectors. Library Stack got in touch with Sam to learn more about his work, and about how this global trade cuts across contemporary politics. Sam spoke at length about how the presumed cultural right to understand the past sometimes pushes against the implicit human right ...

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PublisherUrbanomic1939
In this record of a 1939 meeting, two great philosophers of mathematics, Jean Cavaillès and Albert Lautman, attempt to define what constitutes the ‘life of mathematics’, between historical contingency and internal necessity, describe their respective projects, which attempt to think mathematics as an experimental science and as an ideal dialectics, and respond to interventions from some eminent mathematicians and philosophers.

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2013
The strangeness and mystery of the Voynich Manuscript has inspired musicians and novelists. Not surprisingly, the document has also proved a springboard for visual artists, but the remarkable thing about the body of work made by Miljohn Ruperto and Ulrik Heltoft is how it doesn’t just feed o the manuscript’s secrets and complications but builds upon them to become something odd, fantastic and mysterious in its own right…

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… creates a space for the reader-as-exhibition-viewer to consider how forests may be seen not only for their trees, but also how they can enable experiences of elegance, affirmation, and creation for a multitude of creatures. in response to their violent destruction, which characterizes the Anthropocene, these pages traverse various woodlands by way of their semiotic, socio-political, historical, and epistemic incitements in order to reveal how practices of care, concern, and attention also enable humans to inhabit and flourish in this world as forest.

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