Information Commons

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We live in challenging times. There is overwhelming evidence that massive change is required in order to survive impending environmental collapse. Yet this fifth volume in the Archifutures series takes the position that the “apocalypse” is not an imminent event, but an insidious process that is already happening. Communities everywhere are facing it on a day-to-day basis. Many are already resisting and adapting. Despite the implied drama of the word “apocalypse”, the reality is actually far more mundane: surviving it is not about building bunkers, it is about building resilience – everywhere and in all kinds of ways. Contributors include: Bora ...
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PublisherPrimary Foundry2022
Arena is an open-source typeface inspired by Architype Bayer, Are.na, and heat transfer letterforms and numerals used for athletic kits. Arena has 136 glyphs with basic Latin characters, lining figures, alternates, ligatures, punctuation, and symbols. License includes two styles, Normal and Round, with Desktop (OTF), and Web (WOFF) font formats for Print, Web, App, and Broadcast use. Open Font License allows the font to be used, modified, and redistributed. Typeface designed by Jonathan Maghen.
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Publisherdpr-barcelona2020
As an institutional practice, archival practices often tend to serve to colonization, surveillance and discipline society of the Modern world. In the last ten years, with the digital technology and social movement detecting, recording and accumulating images become a civil activity. Thus, archiving videos and other types of visual images brought also non-institutional practices and as well contemporary discussions related to image, open source, collectivity and forensics. Beside interviews with video activists; this book compiles several writers’ articles on their practices and discussions of archives from several angles: forensics, decolonization and commons.
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On the ledger and the herbarium: the settling of financial and botanical accounts. From the perspective of the twenty-first century, the age of digital media and TCP/IP protocol architecture, the 1989 discovery of the manuscript of Jules Verne’s Paris in the Twentieth Century (1863) in a locked safe perhaps appears more dramatic than the unpublished novel’s retrospectively tepid dystopian prophecies. Yet its narrator Michel Jérôme Dufrénoy’s employment in the banking house of Casmodage et Cie. provides unexpected insight into what it meant to keep the books in nineteenth-century France. The novel is set in a Paris of the 1960s, when literary culture was ...
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This issue brings together poetry, visual art, prose essays, and an interview organized around the theme “Charismatic Facts.” It also includes additions to our ongoing project, Climate Change & Art: A Lexicon. What is the relation between charisma and information? How fast can a well-turned phrase move? How does it age? In this issue of The Distance Plan we consider how, occasionally, facts or argumentative claims float free from their point of origin to become hyper-portable and cross-disciplinary. We call these memorable, animated phrases “charismatic facts” and suggest they can be found at the intersection of flair and research, savvy and ...
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PublisherJoshua Citarella2021
Choose Your Future, 2021, is part of KW Digital: Open Secret, 16 July – 31 December. In 2021, I commissioned a group of artists and memers to write short wiki-style descriptions of fantastical future scenarios. Writers were instructed to copy/paste existing wikipedia entries and “play mad libs” with the nouns and dates. Drawing on movements from the past, these short stories recombine political history to anticipate long tail ideologies and factions that may soon emerge. Choose Your Future takes the hyperbolic imaginings of young people, raised on the internet, and puts their words directly into the mouths of content creators. In this ...
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PublisherEyebeam2014
Computational Fashion is a survey of topics explored during Eyebeam’s public events on wearable technology and fashion in 2012-14. This publication features excerpts from panel discussions and presentations covering 3D printed fashion, smart textiles, energy harvesting, intellectual property, and other issues impacting designers and entrepreneurs in this emerging field.
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PublisherChronos2019
Before the rise of the Web and our contemporary digital cultures, computer networks had already been imagined, tested, and used worldwide. This special issue retraces some of the technological, cultural and social paths that shaped the development of networks in six different areas of the world. The papers and the final conversation between two leading scholars of this issue touch some crucial topics of network histories from a variety of cultural, geographical and disciplinary perspectives. The issue combines studies and researches based on theoretical and empirical analyses in the U.S., Europe, Brazil and South Africa. Among the most relevant case studies, ...
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PublisherCritical Design Lab2019
In Episode seven, Critical Design Lab contributor Cassandra Hartblay and I speak to Marcel LaFlamme about how the concept of open access publishing relates to accessibility. This episode is the second in a two-part series about critical design and accessibility within or adjacent to academia.
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PublisherHatje Cantz2012
Life in all its variety and diversity is rapidly becoming the “property” of corporations through patents and “intellectual property rights.” A patent is an exclusive right granted for an invention. Life, however, is not an invention. We can modify life-forms, we can manipulate living organisms. But we do not create life. The first patent on life was granted to General Electric for a genetically engineered bacterium. In 1971, General Electric and one of its employees, Ananda Mohan Chakrabarty, applied for a U.S. patent on a genetically engineered Pseudomonas bacterium. Taking plasmids from three kinds of bacteria, Chakrabarty transplanted them into a fourth. ...
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A decade ago many gushed at the possibilities of 3D printers and other DIY tech. Today makers are increasingly shaking off their initial blind enthusiasm to numerically control everything, rediscovering an interest in sociocultural histories and futures and waking up to the environmental and economic implications of digital machines that transform materials. An accumulation of critique has collectively registered that no tool, service, or software is good, bad, or neutral—or even free for that matter. We’ve arrived at a crossroads, where a reflective pause coincides with new critical initiatives emerging across disciplines. What was making? What is making? What could making ...

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