Photographic Criticism

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Episode Two explores the benefits and disadvantages of going unseen by surveillance technologies. We examine notions of visibility and invisibility in the context of AI imaging systems with author and professor Simone Browne, artist Sondra Perry, and artist and academic Mimi Onuoha.
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PublisherEdition Société2015
As the physical world degrades and so corrodes the credibility of institutions that enable consumption, the status quo in the global north goes virtual. Within a short time, we’ve witnessed a rapidly increasing capacity to design, simulate and conjure a virtual perception of reality with exactitude and definition. Our ability to simulate reality has come to match our ability to record it. We’re able to simulate and produce a photographic image of an object without any need for the object itself. The same goes for retouched images and the act of retouching. As a result, images no longer need to ...
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PublisherCassava Republic2018
A unique blend of travelogue, photographs and poetry, A Stranger’s Pose draws the reader into a world of encounters haunted by the absence of home, estrangement from a lover and family tragedies. The author’s recollections and reflections of fragments of his journeys to African cities, from Dakar to Douala, Bamako to Benin, and Khartoum to Casablanca, offer a compelling and very personal meditation on the meaning of home and the generosity of strangers to a lone traveler. Inspired by the author’s own travels with photographers between 2011 and 2015, the Iduma’s own accounts are expanded to include other narratives about ...
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PublisherRosa Menkman2010
Glitches are hot. It is clear from what we can see on MTV, Flickr, in the club or the bookstore. While the “Glitch: designing imperfection” coffee table book introduces the glitch design aesthetic to the world of latte drinking designers, and Kanye West uses glitches to sing about his imperfect love life, the awkward, shy and physically ugly celebrate under the header “Glitched: Nerdcore for life”. Glitch has become hot. A brightly colored bubblegum wrapper that doesn’t ask for much involvement, or offers any stimulus. Inside I find gum that I keep chewing – hoping for some new explosion of ...
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In The Age of Total Images, art historian Ana Peraica focuses on the belief that the shape of the planet is two-dimensional which has been reawakened in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, and the ways in which these ‘flat Earth’ conspiracy theories are symptomatic of post-digital image culture. Such theories, proven to be false both in Antiquity and Modernity, but once held to be true in the Medieval Period, have influenced a return to a kind of ‘New Medievalism’. By tracing visual representations of the planet across Western history and culture, Peraica provides support for a media-based explanation behind ...
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Created in 1952 by photographers and writers as “common ground for the advancement of photography,” Aperture today is a multi-platform publisher and center for the photo community. From our base in New York, we produce, publish, and present a program of photography projects, locally and internationally.
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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation with Caren Kaplan introduces the work she has been conducting for her forthcoming book dedicated to a genealogy of aerial photography (and painting) and its militarization leading to the ‘age of the drone’ we currently experience. We begin with the development of the balloon, the progressive learning necessary to understand this new point of view on the world and the simultaneous success of panorama paintings. We then evoke the creation of the British Board of Ordinance and its survey of Scotland as part of the counter-insurrectionist effort to control the terrain against the Jacobites. We conclude the discussion in ...
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PublisherAperture Foundation2014
The older paradigm for photojournalists was to simply record events, with the hope—and frequently the expectation—that people and their governments would be moved to respond to the injustices pictured, as witnessed by the impact of certain images during the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War. Given evolving media and political climates, however, including the billions of images now available online from all kinds of sources, the purpose and effectiveness of media, in particular of visual journalism, has been called into question. Bending the Frame, by author and critic Fred Ritchin, addresses the new and emerging potentials for visual media ...
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New technological media such as film, photography and computers have altered the way we perceive possible relations between stillness and motion in the visual arts. Traditionally, cinema theory saw cinema and especially the ‘illusion of motion’ as part of the ideological swindle of the basic cinematic apparatus. This collection of essays by acclaimed international scholars including Tom Gunning, Thomas Elsaesser, Mark B.N. Hansen, George Baker, Ina Blom and Christa Blümlinger, starts out from a different premise to analyse stillness and motion as part of a larger ecology of images and media. They argue that the strategic uses of stillness and ...
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What finally sits in front of you, Beyond Resolution, is an independently developed and published work – a collection of different types of texts ranging from short stories to basic optics and a manifesto like text, accompanied by a collection of artworks that I developed during the time of writing, presented in an a- chronological order. The organisation of this publication could be considered modular; the chapters can be read independently. However I did choose to order them the way they are for a reason: to present a consistently additive flow…
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Photography has been used as a tool to record our bodies from the creation of the first mugshots in the late 19th century to recent developments in facial recognition technology. In the first episode of Mirror with a Memory, artist Zach Blas and filmmaker and scholar Manthia Diawara will discuss what it means to leave it to machines to verify our identities.
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PublisherDroste Effect2016
Since the coming of image technologies (and particularly with photography, video, and the Web) contemporary culture has lost control over images, which became more and more independent from their author. Luca Panaro formulates his thesis by reinterpreting the works of theorists (Susan Sontag, Walter Benjamin, Vilém Flusser), writers (Luigi Pirandello, Italo Calvino, Penelope Lively), even film directors (Buster Keaton, Michelangelo Antonioni, Wayne Wang), and finally contemporary artists (Franco Vaccari, Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parreno, Wolfgang Staehle, Roberto Cuoghi, Carlo Zanni, Eva and Franco Mattes).

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