Political Art

PublisherThe Funambulist2019
Léopold Lambert met with Indigenous Lakota activists Madonna Thunder Hawk and Marcella Gilbert during their passage in France to present Christina D. King and Elizabeth A. Castle’s film Warrior Women that portrays their struggle over two generation — Madonna is Marcella’s mother. In this conversation, we talked about four episodes of Indigenous resistance in Turtle Island (North America): the occupations of Alcatraz (1969), Mount Rushmore (1971), Wounded Knee (1973) and Standing Rock (2016), all of which were experienced by Madonna. Madonna Thunderhawk is an Oohenumpa Lakota. Born and raised across the Oceti Sakowin homelands, she first became active in the late 1960s as a ...
PublisherRecess2019
Accessibility in the Arts: A Promise and a Practice is an accessibility guide geared toward small-scale arts nonprofits and the potentially expansive publics these organizations serve. It details specific ways in which disabled people are excluded from cultural spaces and offers possible solutions to those barriers. Moving away from historical and juridical definitions of accessibility, this guide considers the unique capacity of small scale arts organizations to meet the needs of disabled communities. It engages principles of disability justice to think through what can urgently be done to create more equitable and accessible arts spaces…
This zine explores anarcho-surrealist imagination in midcentury and current-day USA, with particular emphasis on the Chicagoland scene.
PublishersSternberg Presse-flux2017
Today, many of us can remember the disappeared indigenous cosmologies as parts of ourselves, lost to colonialism, industrialization, communist revolutions, and capitalist wars. Many names have been given to ideological or historical grand narratives to soothe the pain of loss, to register those losses and render them searchable, but these memorializing mechanisms still fail to register the pain of losing something much larger that cannot be named—a deep relation to the world, to the cosmos, and to ourselves that gives us strength and sovereignty without need for any other earthly power of right or dominion. What if another kind of ...
PublishersSternberg Presse-flux2013
What makes a city successful today? Over the past few decades, artists—and more broadly, clusters of creative people—have become central to narratives of urban revitalization and civic growth in cities around the world. In many locales, artists in search of cheap rent constitute the vanguard wedge of gentrification. Yet the so-called creative class includes whole categories of knowledge workers enjoying far less precarious conditions than artists, and it is their affluence that continually leads to the displacement of both working-class residents and artists alike. In the creative city, the branding of subcultural movements, the translation of the gritty into the quaint, ...
PublisherPrinted Matter2010
We contradiction culturists and garbologists. We create our own notes from the toss-out’s of the economy’s music. We strip the music of its purposes and sing the deedles beyond the reach of the purposemakers…
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
An Island Giving Birth to Islands Minia Biabiany is a visual artist based in Mexico city and Guadeloupe. Her work proceeds from an investigation on the perception of space to the paradigms of weaving and opacity in storytelling and language. In her practice she deconstructs narratives linked with colonial presence and heritages in the Guadeloupean territory. She initiated the artistic and pedagogical collective project Semillero Caribe in 2016 and continues today with the ongoing project Doukou, to explore pedagogical decolonial practices with the body and from concepts of Caribbean authors.
PublisherPrinted Matter2012
Occupy Museums approached this booklet as an opportunity to collaboratively reexamine and explore our underlying principles. We developed a list of questions together and gave each member the time and space to answer two or three of their choice autonomously. From the very beginning, with roots deep in Occupy Wall Street’s process and ideals, Occupy Museums has been committed to both group process and the autonomous self-expression of group members. Members of Occupy Museums show an individual voice in this booklet, sometimes agreeing with others and sometimes not, and it is exactly within this dialogue that OM finds its coherence.
PublisherPrinted Matter2011
Petroleum refining began within the Greenpoint area in 1866. More than 50 refineries had been established along Newtown Creek by 1870. Refinery operations ceased in 1966, and petroleum bulk storage discontinued in 1993 on the ExxonMobilowned properties of the former refinery parcels. British Petroleum began operation of a bulk fuel storage terminal in 1969, which continues to operate today. On September 2, 1978, the U.S. Coast Guard discovered an oil spill entering the Newtown Creek from Meeker Avenue. In 1979, an investigation of the spill beneath the Greenpoint area determined the release to be approximately 52 acres, with the total ...
PublisherPrinted Matter2012
Sara Jordenö is a NYC based Swedish visual artist and documentary filmmaker. Using film, photography, drawing and experimental poetry, Jordenö aims to work through historical and contemporary narrations around issues of authorship, labor, real and imaginary queer spaces and the habitual acts of everyday life. While being a resident at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Workspace program in 2010-2011 she started working on a series of works about urban life in New York City, titled “Time and Motion Studies”. This in turn prompted her to enter collaborations with people in other fields than contemporary art.
PublisherPrinted Matter2012
The Zone explores the intersections between neo-liberal and colonial regimes in the contemporary Palestinian context. By evoking both the phantasmagoria of the dream-worlds and the dystopia of the catastrophe that marks this landscape, the project reveals a situation of surreal absurdity and a growing sense of the uncanny. Navigating a dialectic of dreamworld and catastrophe, desire and disaster, past and present. The incongruence is arresting. The dissonance jarring.
PublisherOnCurating.org2018
This issue of OnCurating takes political resistance and sanctuary as its subject, with Herman Melville’s nineteenth-century literary avatar Bartleby—famous for his refrain “I would prefer not to”—as its tutelary spirit. Forms of civil disobedience and tricksterism are coterminous agents in artistic and curatorial practices, both historical and contemporary. How to subvert and subvene, how to recast structural mechanisms of suppression and oppression, how to avoid, deny, magnify, spatially disjoint, and refute (earnestly, comically)? By what means can we, as cultural producers, refuse, while fostering a discourse of reparation? The activism now crucial in the face of ascendant political forces bent ...

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