Index of Titles Filed Under 'Anthropology'

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The third episode of the Corona Under the Ocean chapter, featuring anthropology professor Cynthia Chou, is dedicated to the Orang Suku Laut, a nomadic community from the Malay world sea in Southeast Asia. Thanks to more than three decades of research, Cynthia Chou’s work brings us closer to the worldview and life practices of the Orang Suku Laut, for whom humans are just another element among the many creatures that inhabit oceans and land. Continually moved by the tides, their ancestral relationship with the environment not only puts many aspects of modern societies into question, but shows that another kind ...
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The eighth episode, with professor and anthropologist Elizabeth Povinelli, begins with her idea of axioms of existence, which put in crisis the abstract and universalist condition of Western philosophy. The ocean is not far from Western epistemologies and ontologies. In fact, it is totally entangled in them thanks to their intimate—and strategically invisible—relationship with colonial history and violence. The notion of geontopower, coined by Povinelli, critically revises the Foucauldian notion of biopower. The fictional but real frontier between life and non-life is a political frontier in continuous expansion, even beyond Earth. This podcast is the result of a conversation between ...
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The seventh episode, with curator Camila Marambio is an approach to Tierra del Fuego from her personal experience with a part of the world with which she has a strong emotional connection. As she states, Tierra del Fuego, “despite its remoteness, is the center of the world.” Karokynka is the name by which this area of the world is known by the native Selk’nam people, a culture that still survives in its descendants despite its official death by the modern state of Chile. The fact of proclaiming as dead a culture that is still very much alive is part of ...
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Publisherdos-dos.org2018
Curator Juana Berrío and artist Delcy Morelos visit the Gold Museum in Bogotá, which houses the world’s largest collection of pre-conquest gold artifacts. They talk about the cultural differences of valuing gold objects, highlighting intrinsic, economic, ceremonial or environmental aspects; the uses of plants with power; the poporo; human-animal bodies; and how to overcome the muteness of those distant objects made by eradicated ethnicities.
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PublisherHatje Cantz2020
For quite some time now, ethnographic museums in Europe have been compelled to legitimate themselves. Their exhibition-making has become a topic of discussion, as has the contentious history of their collections, which have come about through colonial appropriation. Clearly, this cannot continue. That the situation can be different is something that Clémentine Deliss explores in her current publication. She offers an intriguing mix of autobiographically-informed novel and conceptual thesis on contemporary art and anthropology. Reflections on her own work while she was Director of Frankfurt’s Weltkulturen Museum (Museum of World Cultures) are interwoven with the explorations of influential filmmakers, artists ...
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PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. The name of Claude Lévi-Strauss, who died exactly two years ago to the day on which I write these notes (October 30, 2011), has be- come emblematically associated with what some call, disdainfully, “binary thought.” Structural anthropology would evidence a reaction- ary partiality for dual, symmetrical, static, and reversible oppositions, and for the analogies of proportionality that one can build with them, such as totemic systems.The French anthropologist would thus be a kind of champion of the bi- nary system (or of the binary machine, as Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari would have said), conceiving ...
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Emily Smith is a designer, researcher, educator, and visual anthropologist based in Berlin. She is currently professor and Head of Communication Design at BTK University of Art and Design where she teaches a range of interdisciplinary, research-based design courses and lectures in design, fine art, anthropology, and architectural academic settings. In this episode, Emily and I talk about her journey through design to anthropology, how graphic design is like choreography, form as a container for ideas, and how research and anthropological processes can play a role in both practice and discourse.

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