Index of Titles Filed Under 'Art History'

Cover art
PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. Sometime in 1971, Harald Szeemann visited Turin in preparation for the documenta exhibition he was curating for the following year. Among the people he tried to meet in the city was Alighiero Boetti, but when Szeemann visited Boetti’s studio, the Italian artist wasn’t there. All indications are that somebody took the curator through the studio and showed him around, and that, mistakenly, Szeemann forgot a small piece of paper with a list of artists’ names. Several weeks might have passed before Boetti returned to Turin (that year he took two long trips to Afghanistan) and ...
Cover art
PublisherFundación Cisneros2013
Carlos Cruz-Diez in conversation with/en conversación con Ariel Jiménez distills over three decades of wide-ranging conversations between preeminent Venezuelan artist Carlos Cruz-Diez and then FC/CPPC Chief Curator Ariel Jiménez. A pioneer in color theory and perception, Cruz-Diez and such artists as Alejandro Otero and Jesús Rafael Soto launched the abstract movements that placed Venezuelan art among the international avant-garde during the 1950s. Born in Venezuela in 1923, Cruz-Diez traveled in Western Europe throughout the 1950s, absorbing Bauhaus color theory and trends in geometric abstraction. He returned to Venezuela in 1957 to help initiate a massive wave of experimentation in Abstract, Concrete, ...
Cover art
PublisherAperture Foundation2014
Core Curriculum: Writings on Photography is the long-awaited collection of essays, reviews, and lectures—some of which have gained a cult following online—by Tod Papageorge, one of the most influential voices in photography today. As the Walker Evans Professor of Photography at Yale University School of Art, Papageorge has shaped the work of generations of artist/photographers, and earned a reputation as an unusually eloquent guide to the work of many important figures in twentieth-century photography. Among the artists Papageorge discusses in this essential volume are Atget, Brassaï, Robert Frank (with Walker Evans), Robert Adams, and his close friend, Garry Winogrand. The ...
Cover art
Publisheronestar press2016
Here are some drips, splashes and pours, all accidental or intentional and all stolen from one late work by a well known master. Sometimes it takes a new type of looking in order to move forward. What do we see when we take things apart and reorganize? Really, it is open to your own interpretation but I included a photo I took to let you know how I feel.
Cover art
Publishere-flux2019
There is a certain plasticity of meaning inherent in any use of language. If that weren’t the case, poetry and literature would not exist. There would only be contracts, scientific formulas, shopping lists, and so forth. Journalism would be properly factual—there would be no fake news or disinformation. All utterances would document isolated events, never evoking larger patterns or tapping into hidden desires. But then the question arises: Even if language could be cleansed of all ambiguity and spin, what role would images play? If language is the problem, images can only be worse. Against a backdrop where postmodern slippages in ...
Cover art
Publishere-flux2019
On November 7, 1929, the Museum of Modern Art “opened in a five-room rented space with an ‘historical’ exhibition of (European) Post-Impressionist art, titled ‘The First Loan Exhibition: Cezanne, Gauguin, Seurat, Van Gogh.’” MoMA’s founding director, Alfred Barr, had the idea that modern works that passed a test called “Torpedo in Time” would, after some fifty years, be considered historical and transfer to the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. At the time, Gertrude Stein also famously quipped that the very idea of a museum of the modern was an oxymoron. In short, MoMA was more of a kunsthalle ...
Cover art
Publishere-flux2020
Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, a “global” art world began to form. Sure, there were already a number of world’s fairs and established international biennials, but this would be different. From the 1990s onward, national boundaries would dissolve, centers and peripheries would level out, and the internet would host worldwide cultural exchange. In many ways this really did happen, but some other things also happened. As people and ideas began to move across borders, money did too. Faced with an unmanageable planetary scale, capital became a more efficient regulator of flows than laws or nations. Suddenly, capital rose ...
Cover art
Publishere-flux2020
As the novel coronavirus pandemic spreads, we—the people of planet earth—are faced with a dizzying variety of responses: quarantine, containment, vigilant self-quarantine, paranoid self-isolation, and in some cases escape from the above. Suddenly, it is as if circulation itself has turned against us, making healthy freedom of movement in the world a dealer of death. So your flight is cancelled. Your trip is over. We are staying in place for the foreseeable future. Exhibitions, symposia, gatherings of all kinds are postponed. But not sporting events. Those will go on, but without any supporters in the stands. The players will play ...
Cover art
Publishere-flux2020
It’s yet uncertain what the lasting legacy of 2020 will be. “The tradition of the oppressed teaches us,” Walter Benjamin wrote in 1940, “that the ‘state of emergency’ in which we live is not the exception but the rule.” We already know that in the US, the summer of 2020 will be remembered for its sustained state of emergency, when we emerged from stratified isolation and convened, in the millions, in the streets to affirm that black lives matter, that black breath is stolen at an overwhelmingly higher scale by the pandemic and by the largely extralegal military organization known ...
Cover art
Publishere-flux2020
Who remembers the title of last year’s Venice Biennale? One long year and change later, it seems that nobody’s worst enemy could have made a threat, a promise, or a curse that we may live in times quite as … “interesting” as the ones we find ourselves in now. Arguably, anyone paying even the most distant attention to 2019—or to history and the evolving present in general—could have foreseen what we were heading towards. It’s hard to imagine, though, that someone could have envisioned just how deadly fascinating these times would turn out to be. In any case, here we are. ...
Cover art
PublisherEven Magazine2018
On episode 13 of Hidden Noise, hosts Abby Sandler and Rebecca Siegel visit the Met Breuer for this week’s Go See: “Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300-now).” Then the hosts are joined by Peter Russo, director of Triple Canopy for the Even 8.
Cover art
PublisherMACBA2011
The third issue of Índex features collaborations by the Director of MACBA’s Independent Studies Programme (PEI) Xavier Antich, the artistic director and co-founder of the Cinémathèque de Tanger Yto Barrada, the curator, writer and Associate Professor and Vice-Director of the Museu de Arte Contemporãnea da Universidade de São Paulo Cristina Freire, the full professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University Daniel Heller-Roazen, the artist, musician and writer Hassan Khan, the art critic Marie Muracciole and the Mexican artist José Antonio Vega Macotela.

We use cookies to improve your experience on our site. Read our privacy policy to learn more. Accept

Join Our Mailing List