Index of Titles Filed Under 'Aurality'

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PublisherTriple Canopy2021
Nikita Gale and Alexander Provan are joined by Derica Shields, a writer, researcher, and cultural worker living in London. She speaks about her book-length oral history of Black experiences of the welfare state, “A Heavy Nonpresence,” and the value of listening to Black peoples’ accounts and analyses of their own lives. Shields reflects on her effort to share the stories of Black people who are mistreated and monitored by the state, while also being made to feel that they should be grateful for receiving the assistance to which they’re entitled. Her work shows how, in Britain, liberal nostalgia for the ...
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PublisherTriple Canopy2020
“Now we have to learn to listen to the speechless ruins.” A meditation on Black silence.
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PublisherHatje Cantz2012
There is no such thing as voice in literature. That is, we assign chimerical properties to characters’ voices; fictions based on voices we have heard in relation to the description of the characters’ personalities; identities we want to confer on the characters. Whilst we read and listen to this voice, it is neither true nor false. It is the product of a careful assembly of traces and features we believe represent a person – more physically even than their own body….
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PublisherTriple Canopy2021
Nikita Gale and Alexander Provan are joined by Tashi Wada, a Los Angeles-based composer and performer. Wada presents Table of Visions, a composition for a “high-resolution player piano” commissioned by Triple Canopy, and asks how we discern between human expression and technical perfection, how we listen to virtuosos and machines. With Gale and Provan, Wada discusses the pandemic-era vogue for liveness at home, technologies that claim to capture the souls of performers, and music that prompts listeners to discern between the sounds of machines and humans. They listen to Conlon Nancarrow, Glenn Gould, Perry Como, advertisements for hi-fi systems, the ...
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PublisherDJ/rupture2012
Yeah, I have tinnitus by now but it’s not so bad… I’ve DJed a lot of parties and made a lot of mixtapes over the years… And now you can listen and download most of them right here. The best place to begin is 2001’s game-changing live 3-turntable mix, Gold Teeth Thief. This influenced a lot of people & opened many ears; over a decade later, the world sounds a lot more like I was hearing/blending it back then. Here’s a list of most of my mixes in chronological order for free download as V0 mp3s. After the list you’ll find ...
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PublisherRadio Web Macba2014
Taking the term soundscape as a starting point, this essay by José Manuel Berenguer addresses a number of concerns relevant to understanding the listening experience within art and everyday life. Tackling questions such as phenomenology, cognition, new media, aesthetics and the overlap between art and science, Berenguer engages in a critical analysis of recent sound art practices, using both significant historical examples and his own experience. Intermedia artist, composer, teacher, curator… The many labels that can be applied to the career of José Manuel Berenguer (Barcelona, 1955) reflect the multidisciplinary drive that has always guided his professional activities. Aside from producing ...
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PublisherTriple Canopy2021
Nikita Gale and Alexander Provan are joined by Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste, an artist, composer, and performer living in New York City. He speaks about bass as a way to repulse people or bring them together, cause aggravation or collective pleasure. He recounts moments in his life when bass, emanating from a parked car or carnival, has shaken his walls, tested his nerves, and made him feel connected to other people, whether or not he appreciates the music blasting from their subwoofers. Ranging from the soundtrack of his childhood in Baton Rouge to the sonic maelstrom of J’ouvert in Brooklyn, Toussaint-Baptiste describes ...
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PublisherTriple Canopy2020
“The more lonesome the isolation, the easier the pitch.” An essay on the exchange of faces for interfaces, suits for sweats, presence for liveness, and freedom for safety; a note on Two Ears and One Mouth. With artworks by Graham Anderson. (This essay is also available as an audio recording.)
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The picture above is a display of the parameters used by the Haskins SineWave Synthesizer (SWS) in experiments that study the temporal aspects of speech. The horizontal axis shows time in milliseconds; the vertical axis shows frequency in Hz. The pattern is a graph of frequency and amplitude variations of three sinusoids. Height in the plane indicates frequency; the thickness of each tracing indicates amplitude. The properties of tonal analogs of speech vary over time. Accordingly, the tones rise and fall in frequency and amplitude in imitation of the frequency and amplitude variations of vocal resonances over the course of ...
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PublisherTriple Canopy2021
Nikita Gale and Alexander Provan are joined by Harmony Holiday, a writer, archivist, and dancer who lives in Los Angeles. Holiday, whose essay “The Black Catatonic Scream” was published by Triple Canopy last year, speaks about Black performers whose songs and struggles reflect the ongoing trauma of the “African holocaust.” She links the history of Black music—and instances of performers becoming silent or speechless—to the legacy of enslavement and segregation, when Black people “were smiling and dancing to not get killed.” With Gale and Provan, she discusses the pressure to pander to white audiences as well as the impulse to ...
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PublisherTriple Canopy2021
Nikita Gale, an artist living in Los Angeles and the co-host of Medium Rotation, speaks with Alexander Provan about the forces that shape what we listen to and with whom, and how the segregation of cities has been bolstered on the airwaves. They discuss the trajectory from “race records” to so-called Urban songs, and the role of the music industry in determining whose voices are amplified and whose are silenced. The conversation is followed by a reading of “Little Girls,” Gale’s Triple Canopy essay on Tina Turner, Phil Spector. The essay considers “the sound of being together—or of being packed ...
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PublisherRepeater Books2017
Part rigorous history, part insightful commentary, and part memoir, Mad Skills tells the story behind MIDI, through the twentieth century’s kaleidoscopic lens. Guiding us across one hundred years of musical instruments, and the music made with them, it recounts the technical and creative innovations that led to the making of the most vital, long-standing, ubiquitous, and yet invisible music technology of our time.

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