Index of Titles Filed Under 'Aurality'

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PublisherFHNW HGK2022
Labour of Listening by Kate Lacey is the first episode of the new podcast series Ages of Receivership: On Generous Listening, based on the 2022 symposium with the same title. In her contribution the author and Professor of Media History and Theory at the University of Sussex talks about the act of listening as a form of labor, about listening out and listening in and what it means to create a space, where speech and listening can take place. The podcast series Ages of Receivership: On Generous Listening emerges from the spring 2022 Master Symposium at the Institute Art Gender Nature, ...
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PublisherFHNW HGK2022
Subject, the fourth episode of the series Ages of Receivership: On Generous Listening, is based on a talk by Bill Dietz, composer, writer, and co-chair of the Music/Sound Department in Bard College’s Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts in New York. Within the setting of his talk he speaks to the audience unamplified, reflecting on the power of the structural and infrastructural preconditions of audibility in spaces specially designed and equipped for talks and presentation. The series Ages of Receivership: On Generous Listening emerges from the spring 2022 Master Symposium at the Institute Art Gender Nature, moderated by Chus Martínez ...
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PublisherUrbanomic2016
François J. Bonnet talks about The Order of Sounds: A Sonorous Archipelago, his book on the philosophy of sound and listening, explaining the motivation behind its examination of modes of listening and its mapping of plural sonic ontologies, and expanding on some of the concepts he introduces in order to take account of the ‘schizological’ nature of sound. The podcast concludes with an exclusive track by Bonnet’s alter-ego Kassel Jaeger. Music used in this podcast: Kassel Jaeger, ‘Campo Del Cielo’, from Deltas (Editions Mego). Bernard Parmegiani, ‘Des mots et des sons’, from L’Oeuvre Musicale (INA-GRM). Robin Mackay, Field Recording from St Agnes beach, 12 May 2016 0930. TLAOTLON, ‘The Co-Domain’, from Natural ...
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PublisherMuseo Reina Sofía2020
By way of a selection of hundreds of sound works, Audiosphere: Sound Experimentation 1980-2020 looks to cover an historical and cultural void in terms of the recognition, exhibition and analysis of a key part of the recent changes that have taken place in the artistic conception of sound creation. In the following catalogue, the curatorial discourse that articulates the exhibition is displayed along with some texts that affect the relevance of sound art in contemporary art and, with it, in the social field.
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Publisheronestar press2010
This book is based on the performance Batsong, rehearsals for an audioplay, which took place at APF LAB in New York, March 2009. This performance was an attempt to tell the story of a female singer, plagued by the inability to hear her voice objectively. I wanted to depict a narrative about failed perspective through sound but, before we began, had no idea how to develop a situation to render this failure. Using scattered pages of dialogue, monologue, actions and instructions I’d written—along with lists of objects for imitating sounds, one small room and a stationary recording device with one microphone—four ...
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PublisherTriple Canopy2021
Nikita Gale and Alexander Provan are joined by Derica Shields, a writer, researcher, and cultural worker living in London. She speaks about her book-length oral history of Black experiences of the welfare state, “A Heavy Nonpresence,” and the value of listening to Black peoples’ accounts and analyses of their own lives. Shields reflects on her effort to share the stories of Black people who are mistreated and monitored by the state, while also being made to feel that they should be grateful for receiving the assistance to which they’re entitled. Her work shows how, in Britain, liberal nostalgia for the ...
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PublisherTriple Canopy2020
“Now we have to learn to listen to the speechless ruins.” A meditation on Black silence.
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PublisherHatje Cantz2012
There is no such thing as voice in literature. That is, we assign chimerical properties to characters’ voices; fictions based on voices we have heard in relation to the description of the characters’ personalities; identities we want to confer on the characters. Whilst we read and listen to this voice, it is neither true nor false. It is the product of a careful assembly of traces and features we believe represent a person – more physically even than their own body. ‘Chimerization’ is a term Florian Hecker uses to allude to another complex operation: the artificial attribution of the properties of ...
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PublisherCritical Design Lab2020
Image description is a practice that is often associated with creating accessibility for blind people. While, according to some people, image descriptions are supposed to be objective accounts of what is happening in a photo or film, some disabled artists are using image descriptions to critique other forms of inaccessibility. On this episode of Contra*, I talk to hard-of-hearing artist Liza Sylvestre about her work, which draws on methods of image description and film captioning to critique popular films, and with them, the broader culture of audism, which assumes that everyone has equal access to hearing sound.
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PublisherCritical Design Lab2019
In Episode six, we begin a two-part series on critical design and accessibility within or adjacent to academia. In this episode, we talk to Ideas on Fire CEO Cathy Hannabach about podcasting design as a tool for creating more just worlds.
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Publisheronestar press2012
1. In 1991 I wrote critical notes on the nature of The Poet: “I have a fixation with a poem’s disgrace.” 2. I recorded myself reading from these notes. 3. Soon after, while the audio track played, I had myself video-taped leaping into a corner. 4. I was to present the video to an audience at the Bijou Theater at CalArts. 5. Just prior to the screening, I previewed the video to a friend who told me, rather severely, that I mispronounced a key term: Polyphony. I uttered “poly-phone-ee.” The correct pronunciation is pa-l-f’a-nee. 6. Panic-stricken, I immediately told the projectionist to mute the audio. ...

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