Index of Titles Filed Under 'Citizenship'

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PublisherUrbanomic1998
In these interviews dating from 1998, Châtelet amplifies the major themes of To Live and Think Like Pigs, discusses his method of dramatisation and the crucial importance of style; and touches on subjects from dialectics to dope smoking, from Yoplait to slavery, along the way introducing some of the book’s key concepts: cybercattle, the average man, the tapeworm-citizen, and of course the pitiful couple Cyber-Gideon and Turbo-Bécassine.
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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Ann Laura Stoler and I begin this conversation by introducing the political context lexicon that she co-curates and edits. We then discuss the work she had done around the colonial management of sexuality and reproduction. The existence of the métis (mix-blooded) child in the colony renders more complex the binary distinction between colon citizens and colonial subjects. Biology is nevertheless not merely the only site of recognition for the colonial administration, behavior is also extremely important in the access to citizenship. We examine how space, whether corridor or school, is built to accommodate the administrated behavior of the colony. Finally, Ann gives us a preview ...
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PublisherSternberg Press2016
“At the heart of this book is a simple and profound proposition: to ‘do’ architecture is to immerse oneself in a conflictual process of material production—participation is not a productive encounter of multiple practitioners and stakeholders, but a set of conflicts, negotiations, maneuvers, and swindles between and within a multiplicity of agents, human and nonhuman alike—equally including architects, clients, financiers, and builders, say, but also silicon, plastic, concrete, each with its conflicting aims and different material means to achieve them. Every building is thus the materialization of such encounter. So, despite the hubris of the field, none of the parties ...
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PublisherInventory Press2018
Globalization, technology, and politics have altered the definition and expectations of citizenship and the right to place. Dimensions of Citizenship documents contributions from the seven firms selected to represent the United States in the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale. This paperback volume profiles and illustrates each of the US Pavilion contributions and contextualizes them in terms of scale. Drawing inspiration from the Eames’ Power of Ten, Dimensions of Citizenship will provide a view of belonging across seven stages starting with the individual (Citizen), then the collective (Civic, Region, Nation), and expanding to include all phases of contemporary society, real and projected (Globe, ...
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Publishere-flux2016
Early in the new century, it is already clear that the vanguards of the last one were less a singular, sequential telos than a symptomatic cycle. Movements like impressionism, abstraction, conceptualism, or symbolism are more like weather patterns that recur under certain circumstances than historical exceptions never to be repeated. There are everyday sprinkles of impressionism which relate to a Monet in the same way that the average rainstorm relates to a hurricane. In “Towards the New Realism,” Boris Groys examines the revival of what is still the most suggestive and polyamorous of these commitments, the pursuit of the real. ...
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PublisherUrbanomic2017
Badiou examines the relation between the Communist Hypothesis and the question of immigration and the ‘foreigner’, and suggests that, in order to pursue the consequences of the declaration that we share the same world, we must value identity-in-becoming over identity-as-defence.
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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation with Ahmad Barclay turns around the work done by Visualizing Impact / Visualizing Palestine of which he is a partner. For the last few years, this Beirut-based office have produced a few dozens of visuals mostly representing didactically various aspects of life in the apartheid policies undertaken throughout the years by the Israeli government. We talk about the various statuses of citizenship and what they allow, the infrastuctural aspects of the apartheid (roads, public transportation, water, etc.), the destruction of Palestinian homes and olive trees, before concluding the conversation by evoking the broader work currently undertaken by Visualizing ...
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Reality Leigh Winner, a 25-year old Georgia federal contractor who had top secret clearance, will become the first American charged for leaking documents under the Espionage act during the Trump administration. Winner anonymously sent an NSA document to The Intercept which appeared to prove that Russian state-sponsored hackers had engaged in spearphishing efforts to disrupt American voting systems, aiming to dupe local precinct officials and the employees of companies who make voting software. The report doesn’t prove these efforts were successful, just that they happened. Tracked by the microscopic dot pattern left by her company’s color laser printer, Winner, who served ...
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Aggie Toppins is a graphic designer and educator whose work centers around active citizenship and intellectual pursuit. She’s currently teaches at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and maintains an independent studio practice publishing zines, collages, and a fun series called Critical Theory Cocktails. In this episode, Aggie and I talk about her introduction to critical theory and how she introduces challenging texts to her students, how her time at MICA inspired her to start teaching, and why it’s important to decolonize the design discourse.
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Milton S. F. Curry is dean and professor at the University of Southern California School of Architecture and holds the Della & Harry MacDonald Dean’s Chair in Architecture. He previously taught at University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Arizona State University, Harvard, and Cornell. He also edited the journals Critical Productive and Appendx. In this episode. Jarrett and Milton talk about the citizen architect, the relationship between critical theory and design, and the limits of design thinking.
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Mimi Zeiger is a writer, critic, curator and editor. She’s written for a variety of publications including The New York Times, Dwell, Domus, and The Architectural Review and is the founder of Loud Paper, a zine and digital publication that sought to increase the output of architectural discourse. She was also the co-curator for the US Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale, which had the theme “Dimensions of Citizenship.” In this episode, Mimi and I talk about how she started writing after beginning a career as an architect, the role of the critic, and why we need architecture and ...
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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
In this conversation, Mahmoud Keshavarz and I talk about our common interest for the way the designed environment (in particular objects) unfolds a violence to the bodies that it hosts, as well as the potential political actions that can be undertook through design. Mahmoud’s work being particularly focused on the facilitated or obstructed fluxes of migration, we discuss at length the politics of objects that regulate them, the passport in particular, but also the charter flight that implements the expulsion of a body from a given territory. We speak of the regime of invisibility of the violence in which the ...

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