Index of Titles Filed Under 'Collective Architecture'

PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation with two members of a relatively new whistleblowing platform — we called them Sarah and Cleo to preserve their anonymity — intends to present the latter. It allows people working on development projects in London to leak information that can be used by local inhabitant associations to organize in time their defense against their planned eviction. We discuss the platform both theoretically — the conceptual approach to disobedience will be presented in the next conversation with Elena Loizidou — and practically, through the perspective of (often young) architects working in development projects, and the ones of local associations through the workshops organized ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
For Nikolaos Patsopoulos, the current situation in Europe is similar to the one in Russia right before the revolution and so should be the architecture that accompanies these shift of social paradigms. We discuss about the role of the architect in revolutionary movements, as (s)he has probably more to unlearn than to teach in this matter. For Nikolaos however, each body that modifies the way the built environment (in particular the street) operates politically can be called architect. We therefore spend the time to contrast these two figures sharing the same name of architect, one that contributes actively to the production of ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2013
Each architecture that was thought as a physical implementation of private property contains already in itself the potential for containment in a legal situation like the one of quarantine. David Garcia talks about the origins of such a situation, its territorialization (lazaretto, Ellis Island etc.) as well as its application on bodies, but also on entire landscapes like in Chernobyl and Fukushima. We discuss about Michel Foucault’s definition of biopolitics through the historical example of the quarantined city that suffers from the plague, as well as David’s own architectural projects in response to the various problems tackle by quarantine. David Garcia ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2013
Daniel and I had this conversation the day after the 2013 Goldsmiths Graduate Conference, where we were both participating in a panel suitably entitled “The Sea, Shores, Islands – Territory, Sovereignty and the State.” His paper “The Construction of the End,” given that day is the starting point of our discussion, in which we discuss the legal debates about the location of the shore line in Spain, the national claims of sovereignty of a given territory based on scientific and technological criteria, as well as the various circumventions of the law that provide a form of cabinet of architectural curiosities of which ...

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Publisherdpr-barcelona2014
This essay looks at the case of Collective Towns in Iraqi Kurdistan as an example of how State interventions on the ground are often instruments utilised to implement broader political plans. Throughout the 1970s and the 1980s the Iraqi government made full use of spatial planning as a constitutive part of the strategy of “dealing with the Kurdish problem”. Recchia’s argument is that the Ba’ath regime adopted urban planning and space design as social engineering devices in its larger scheme of shaping society into a more homogenous and simplified form. The Iraqi government used the combination of ethnopolitics and a centralised ideology ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
In this conversation that occurred before her presentation at New York’s Left Forum, Tings Chak and I discuss about the historical and contemporary racialized treatment of migrant bodies in North America and Europe. Refused, expelled, marginalized, or detained, the migrant body is a precarious one. Through Ting’s upcoming graphic-essay book, we talk about carceral architecture, in particular the one that embodies the numerous migrant detention centers in Canada. What does that mean at a legal standpoint to be incarcerated not for punishing reasons but for administrative reasons? How does architecture unfold violence upon bodies through its very physicality? What would ...

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The title of this project has been adapted with reference to the disputed concept of an Existenzminimum, which was conceived as an emergency measure to regulate the provision of low-cost housing for the growing working class between the World Wars, but has been criticized for perpetuating low- standard living conditions for the underprivileged. Existenzoptimum builds upon the ideals of the Existenzminimum while developing a proposal for cooperative living in opposition to family life and its ideology, considering issues such as class, gender etc.  

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PublisherFailed Architecture2018
The area around Calais, a town in northern France, has for many years been a major transit point for refugees on their way to the United Kingdom. During the recent peak in the number of refugees, the French and British authorities increasingly fortified this border landscape, forcing those on the move to build increasingly permanent shelters for themselves. As this self-built city, also sometimes referred to as ‘the jungle’, continued to grow the response of the authorities became increasingly violent. By now, the self-built city has been fully evicted and demolished, displacing its inhabitants. The media hype following these events prompted ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
In this conversation, Mimi Zeiger and I examine a problem internal to the architectural world, yet that can be found in various forms in other disciplines. The “politics of simulacra” consists in a discursive use of consensual notions to describe practices that do not fully engage with the problems that they claim to address. In this regard, curating exhibitions or publications celebrating “women in architecture” often falls short of making a deep feminist argument. Similarly, the recent sum of energy spent around questions of “participation,” “openness,” “horizontality,” are interesting in what they suggest but too often do not make the ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation focuses on the research Olivia Ahn has been conducting these last two years in the relationship design and bodies develop with each other in the architectural typology of the suburban house. We examine together the historical and political logic that created the American suburbia after the second world war. One of these logics consists in the (re)invention of the female gender to whom the suburban house was destined. Olivia describes how the plan of the suburban house, including its compartmentalization into specific rooms, has allowed codified behaviors to enact themselves. We talk about how the control and production of a heteronormative sexuality takes part into this ...

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PublisherSALT2015
For the first time in the forty years that have passed since its formation, the experience of the Global Tools counter-school has been brought together in book form, uniting the images and archive documents that were produced over the few short years of its existence. This volume is compiled to chronicle and evaluate the three years of seminar activity that took place between Florence, Milan and Naples in the early 1970s, bringing to a wider audience the story of this tentative attempt to realize an experimental dispersed educational program that would serve as an alternative to the university as an ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2011
This podcast is special as it is more of an homage than a conversation like the ones orchestrated for Archipelago. It is an excerpt of a recording — I apologize for the bad quality of the sound — I made in October 2011 with poet-artist-philosopher-architect Madeline Gins. She died on January 8, 2014 and it is not without emotion that I listened to this recording again. This conversation came after an exchange of letter that can be read on The Funambulist as preamble; we then had a conversation at the end of a day spent at the unique Bioscleave House designed by Gins and her late husband Shuzaku ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Martin Byrne aims at introducing the rich literary work of science fiction author Philip K. Dick (1928-1982). We explore together his recurrent hypotheses of overlapping realities, the idea of entropy of matter and mind as expressed through the neologisms of kipple and gubble, the question of what is a human being thanks to the character of the android, and finally Dick’s mysticism through his exegesis. Dick’s work has been adapted many times in cinema and is recurrently quoted in current events, as his inexhaustible imagination has depicted more or less near futures which base tell us something about our present. Martin ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2013
The law is an apparatus of power that inscribes itself on the bodies. Legal theorist Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos responds to questions, hypotheses and intuitions I have as an architect about the relationship between law, space and bodies. Beyond my own understanding of the law as the diagrammatization of the relationships of power that architecture undertakes to embody through its materiality, Andreas prefer to think of the law as a whole, even including paradoxically the outlaw within its system. In this understanding, we look together at the law’s axioms, its requisites and its signs. Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos is the director of the Westminster Law ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2013
This conversation is based around Morgan’s expertise in 16th-century European fortified architecture. We focus on Niccolò Machiavelli’s writings about the parallel that can be found between military architecture and the “virtuous” sovereignty of the Prince. Machiavelli distinguishes fortresses that are used in the context of the continuous state of war of the Italian cities from those used to protect the sovereign against its own people. Morgan and I cannot fail to notice the similitude in contemporary United States, its internal management of firearms and its external wars executed from the comfortable position of the drone pilot. Morgan is a scholar of ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation was recorded in October 2013 with Camille Lacadée a moment before she filmed the installation she designed with François Roche for the Retrospective Pierre Huyghe at the Pompidou Center. The particularity of this podcast is that the editing was kindly made by Camille herself who ‘saved’ it from the atmospheric noise that surrounded us when recording it. This conversation constitutes a casual account of the creative process that she and her partner, François Roche, use in order to create works at the intersection of cinema and architecture. The recurrent element of these films (see below) could be seen in the ...

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Making Room: Cultural Production in Occupied Spaces is an anthology of texts on art, media and aesthetic practice in the context of squatting, occupation and urban space activism. It includes pieces by activist researchers working between the academy and the movements they write about, as well as journalistic first-person narratives by squatters, original photography, and interviews with artists, theorists and activists involved in struggles over urban space and creative production in the city. Focused primarily on the European context, its international relations and connection, this diverse collection of material is organized into sections by country so as to highlight the ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with David Gissen uses his two book Subnature and Manhattan Atmospheres in order to demystify the politically charged romanticism of a “green” nature. We talk about the unwanted matter of architecture: dust, puddles, debris, exhaust as components of a subnature that carry in them more ambiguous socio-political narratives than the marketable greenness. The second part of the conversation is particularly attached to the history of the atmospheric urbanity of Manhattan, before we end by introducing David’s project (see below) to reproduce the mound of dirt of the 1871 Paris Commune on which the Vendôme Column had been ceremonially destroyed. David Gissen is associate professor ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
In this conversation with Ana Džokić, we address the local politics of space and architecture in the capital city of Serbia, and former capital city of Yugoslavia, Belgrade. We use Ana’s carrier as an architect to explore the evolution of the way the city is inhabited from what she calls “wild city” at the end of the 1990s (recalling two other Archipelago conversations in Mexico City and Cairo) to the most recent capitalist development (in particular the Belgrade Waterfront project). We also questions the role of architects and its evolution in this politics, from the position of technocrat to the one that orchestrates conversation about ...

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Geoff Manaugh’s blog BLDGBLOG, which he started in 2004 to talk about architecture and landscapes, has been one of my favorite blogs for years. He’s also the author of the book, A Burglar’s Guide to the City, which was optioned for television by CBS, and has contributed to publications like The New York Times, The Atlantic, Cabinet Magazine, The New Yorker, and Domus. In this episode, Geoff and I talk about how architecture became the center of a venn diagram of his various interests, the changing state of architecture discourse, working with editors, and how to look at design through ...

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Mark Lamster is the architectural critic of the Dallas Morning News, a Loeb Fellow at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and a professor in the architecture school at the University of Texas at Arlington. He’s the author of several books, and is currently finishing a biography of architect Philip Johnson. In this episode, Mark and I talk about how he started writing about architecture, how making books is like making architecture, what it’s like writing about architecture for a daily newspaper, and how technology is changing the role of the critic.

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PublisherShifter2013
A city square is occupied by hundreds of shouting voices, and transformed by hundreds of sleeping bodies building together a polis for action as well as a home for repose. High-rises are erected and builders hunch and squat in tight quarters, catching breath between shifts. As houses are boarded up, the occasional scene of an underground bench occupied by a bundled figure under blankets becomes more frequent. Shifter’s 21st issue, Other Spaces, considers the body as a site where architecture’s traditional polarities of private and public collapse. This polarity, mirrored in the distinctions we draw between individual and social freedoms and ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Lucia Jalón Oyarzun and I share a fascination for the act of cartographying. In this conversation, we establish the impossibility for a map to live by the status of objectivity that the common understanding of it comprises. We look at cartographies accomplished by her students or by Peter Greenaway in his film A Walk Through H. (1978), which, on the contrary, embrace their subjectivity. This embrace is often characterized by their modus operandi that creates these maps through a dimensioning accomplished directly by the body, the body being what is subjected by the spaces that these cartographies describe. Lucia Jalón Oyarzun is an architect by the ...

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Publisherdpr-barcelona2015
The Adhocracy READER, an e-Book that unfolds the issues that widens up and deepen the theoretical, historical and empirical theme of the exhibition Adhocracy ATHENS. The publication also tries to get rid from the assumption of what a catalog should be. It does not collect or list exhibited projects; but the ideas and texts which have inspired both the curators and practitioners of the selected projects. Adhocracy is a philosophy of action characterized by creative, flexible, purposeful attitude. Unlike bureaucracy and its fixed schemes, Adhocracy is adjustable to different challenges and situations. Adhocracy uses available systems in unimagined ways to face ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation is the last one of the Latin America series. Antonádia Borges and I talk about the “weaponized architecture” that Brasilia as a ‘new city’ — we also discuss about this myth — has been implemented historically (during the two decades of dictatorship) and still nowadays through the strong social segregation at work. We evoke the more or less embraced violence of the funding of such a city, particularly materialized in the context of a dictatorship. The second part of the conversation is dedicated to the politics of time at work through the administration process of housing and welfare. The ...

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