Index of Titles Filed Under 'Colonial Modernism'

PublisherThe Funambulist2017
Editor’s Note: This entry has been altered to honor a ‘Right to Be Forgotten’ request by one of the work’s contributors. The associated audio file is no longer available. This conversation with [Anonymous], Nathalie Muchamad, Miki Nitadori & Ayomih intends to examine the specificity of anti-Asian in France. Although it was recorded in January 2017, it resonates with a particularly urgent echo today as, a few day ago, the French police killed Liu Shaoyo, a 56-year-old Chinese Parisian, in his own apartment, in front of his four (French) children. Far from the ‘simple’ observations of biased prejudices that characterize many conversations about ...
PublisherFall Semester2014
Clouds It was the year 1954 when the “Department of Tropical Architecture“ was founded at the Architectural Association (AA) London, by Maxwell Fry, Jane Drew and their colleague James Cubbitt. Tropical architecture had been a topic before the study programs foundation, large conferences like the “Conference on tropical architecture” March 1953 at University College, London or two years before in Venezuela had established the issue internationally. The AA Tropical Architecture study program ran till 1971 and was afterwards transferred to the University of London and proceeded there as the “Development Planning Unit” that is active till today. The AA program included lectures ...
The e-publication Decolonising Archives aims to show how archives bear testimony to what was, even more so than collections. Archives present documents that allow one to understand what happened and in which order. Today Internet technology, combined with rapid moves made on the geopolitical chessboard, make archives a contested site of affirmation, recognition and denial. As such, it is of great importance to be aware of processes of colonialisation and decolonisation taking place as new technology can both be used to affirm existing hegemonic colonial relationships or break them open.
Decolonising Museums is the second thematic publication of L’Internationale Online; it addresses colonial legacies and mindsets, which are still so rooted and present today in the museum institutions in Europe and beyond. The publication draws from the conference Decolonising the Museum which took place at MACBA in Barcelona, 27-29 November 2014 (among the contributors to this thematic issue, Clémentine Deliss, Daniela Ortiz and Francisco Godoy Vega participated at this seminar), and offers new essays, responding to texts published on the online platform earlier this year.
Publishere-flux2012
For the Summer 2012 issue of e-flux journal we are very pleased to present a special “Animism” issue guest-edited by Anselm Franke, curator of the exhibition by the same name. Even if you missed Animism on tour in Europe since it began at Extra City and MUHKA in Antwerp in 2010, you have probably learned of its encompassing mobilization of the systems of inclusion and exclusion defining “science” and “culture.” The various stages of the exhibition have shown the discourse of animism to be a crucial skeleton key for releasing the deadlocks formed by the repressed religious, teleological, and colonial ...
Publishere-flux2018
In opening the book The White Possessive: Property, Power, and Indigenous Sovereignty (2015), Aileen Moreton-Robinson leads with an epigraph: “The problem with white people is they think and believe that they own everything.” In terms of a critique of the seven-centuries-long rollout and contestation of European dispossessive power, this citation is the alpha and the omega. It is incredibly hard to add anything that isn’t captured within its succinct analysis. Nevertheless, this special issue of e-flux journal goes to work amid the breadth of this statement—seeking greater insight into its truth and the counter-tactics therein through aesthetic study in particular. The essays, ...
PublisherFailed Architecture2018
Italy’s landscape is dotted with unfinished structures. For a myriad of reasons, the construction of these buildings and pieces of infrastructure stopped half-way, leaving the often concrete and often striking remains of hitherto incomplete plans. The ‘Incompiuto Siciliano’ (Unfinished Sicilian) project has been mapping and researching these many structures, on Sicily as well as in the rest of the country. And, to draw attention to the phenomenon, started to refer to them as “Italy’s Most Prominent Architectural Style”. In this episode, we join Incompiuto on a trip to one of the largest unfinished objects, ‘La Diga di Blufi’, 130km south of ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2014
We begin this podcast with Bhakti Shringarpure introducing the online journal Warscapes that she founded. The discussion that follows emerges from an original unsuspected dialogue between two articles Bhakti and I wrote in Summer 2012, when Ansar Dine destroyed several Sufi mausoleums and precious manuscripts in Timbuktu. Bhakti had then put back into political and historical context and compared such “rage against the monuments” (see below) with the writings of Georges Bataille about the take of the Bastille, considered as the beginning of the 1789 French revolution. In my own article, I had attempted to show how both iconoclasts and iconodules are considered as such ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Fiona I.B. Ngô focuses on her book, Imperial Blues (2014) that develops a discourse around the simultaneous suppressive and productive aspects of race and sex through a travel in the various geo(chrono)graphies of New York in the 1920s. We talk of the various signs (bodies, objects, spaces) created and worn to reference the imperial vision of that that it is not. We also converse about the movement of bodies, at a transnational level, as much as at the level of the body dancing (“the cops are here, let’s play a waltz!”) without forgetting the movement between various neighborhoods of New ...
PublisherSALT2015
For the first time in the forty years that have passed since its formation, the experience of the Global Tools counter-school has been brought together in book form, uniting the images and archive documents that were produced over the few short years of its existence. This volume is compiled to chronicle and evaluate the three years of seminar activity that took place between Florence, Milan and Naples in the early 1970s, bringing to a wider audience the story of this tentative attempt to realize an experimental dispersed educational program that would serve as an alternative to the university as an ...
PublisherWomen on Airplanes2017
The multi-layered research and exhibition project Women on Aeroplanes seeks to change the parameters of how we see and listen to the achievements and practices of women in a multitude of moments, being part of a transatlantic and transnational history, with a focus on the struggles for independence and their after effects. The transition from mobilizing all possible forces to win a battle and its hangover, the disenchantment of not being part of any negotiation concerning the future, seems to crystalise a history lesson about power politics. The disappearance of women in politics after their strong visibility during the times ...
PublisherWomen on Airplanes2018
Lagos: Search, Research Research always makes life complicated. We might end up knowing too much, getting lost in accumulated information, stories, details, in between perspectives that all fall apart. How do we begin such a process and how do we navigate it, how do we move within? How do we set the premises? What do we do next? What to do with a discovery we don’t want to make? Which form, format should it take? All these questions will stay with us and transform through issue 2 of the Women on Aeroplanes Inflight Magazine. And yes, as many an- swers turn ...
PublisherWomen on Airplanes2018
My life is a collage, with time cutting and ar- ranging the materials and laying them down, overlapping and contrasting, sometimes with the fresh shock of a surrealist painting, wrote Eileen Agar, photographer and painter, associated with the Surrealist movement who, like Colette Omogbai, attended the Slade School of Fine Art—almost exactly 40 years earlier, be- tween 1925 and 1926. The repetition of a certain phrasing in connection with Colette Omogbai, a pioneering Nigerian painter, “who identified as a Surrealist,” sent us looking into histories of surrealisms. The plural here is important, be- cause there are indeed many invocations and ...
PublisherWomen on Airplanes2017
The idea of making use of spaces, transforming existing ones, creating new ones, making a living and a change, very much carries through the following pages. The importance to have, maintain, and organise places, frameworks, and opportunities that allow a continuity to negotiate and fight over common grounds. Making spaces vibratory. To imagine a restaurant or a nightclub in Manchester or London in the 1930s as a business proposition but at the same time as a safe space in which to conspire to liberate Africa; to imagine a restaurant as an art gallery—while working as a waitress—and proceeding to turn ...
PublisherThinkbelt2019
Author and activist Andrew Ross surveys the contributions of Palestinian labor to the building of Israel.
PublisherThinkbelt2020
Tracing the evolution of aided self-help housing in Peru over three decades beginning in the 1950s, Helen Geiger contemplates how this hands-on model for improving squatter settlements persisted under different political regimes, competing ideological agendas, and strained expert-resident relations.
Living with Ghosts: Legacies of Colonialism and Fascism is a constellation of essays, conversations and images that point to the manner in which the legacies of colonialism and fascism reverberate in our present conjuncture. The impulse for producing this issue was a question of whether it may be possible to trace the connections between the violences of the colonial project through the horrors of fascism to current forms of racism, identitarianism and populism – what we initially called ‘an arc’ of colonialism-nationalism-fascism. These shifts are palpable in the contemporary political uncertainties expressed in this collection of texts. Each of the contributors reflect ...
For almost 20 years, Detlef Mertins has been a critical voice in renewing our understanding of architectural modernity. Architect, historian, professor, his essays have often taken up familiar themes in order to redress inaccuracies and release energies that we were unaware of. These essays elaborate on such key modernist tropes as transparency, glass architecture, organicism, life and event, sameness and difference. Previously published in a variety of different venues, from journals to anthologies – including such noted books as Lars Spuybroek’s NOX: Machining Architecture and FOA’s Phylogenesis – they are now assembled for the first time in this volume.
PublisherShifter2008
While stranded in Dublin, Ohio on September 13th 2001 due to the grounding of all domestic flights in the US, the editors visited the local library. umbing through the card catalogue, they found a reference to “Other Possibilities,” by Indira Sylvia (I.S.) Belissop assigned the Dewey Decimal call number 125.20. Let alone the book, even this curious number inserted between “Teleology” (124) and “ e Self” (126) has since been impossible to find in major libraries around the world. e book itself did not appear on the shelf, and the card, in classic Courier font, stated simply, “Collected writings of ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Ann Laura Stoler and I begin this conversation by introducing the political context lexicon (see below) that she co-curates and edits. We then discuss the work she had done around the colonial management of sexuality and reproduction. The existence of the métis (mix-blooded) child in the colony renders more complex the binary distinction between colon citizens and colonial subjects. Biology is nevertheless not merely the only site of recognition for the colonial administration, behavior is also extremely important in the access to citizenship. We examine how space, whether corridor or school, is built to accommodate the administrated behavior of the colony. Finally, Ann gives us a ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2017
Samia Henni and I recorded this conversation after a visit of her exhibition, Discreet Violence: Architecture and the French War in Algeria at ETH University in Zurich. In it, we attempt to introduce the historical context of the Algerian Revolution between 1945 and 1962, as well as the French architecture of counter-revolution designed against it, in particular the so-called “regrouping” camps in which the population of entire villages of rural Algeria were forcefully relocated by the colonial army. We also discuss of the challenges of curating such an exhibition when most of the available documents come from the colonizer side, as ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation is the last one of the Latin America series. Antonádia Borges and I talk about the “weaponized architecture” that Brasilia as a ‘new city’ — we also discuss about this myth — has been implemented historically (during the two decades of dictatorship) and still nowadays through the strong social segregation at work. We evoke the more or less embraced violence of the funding of such a city, particularly materialized in the context of a dictatorship. The second part of the conversation is dedicated to the politics of time at work through the administration process of housing and welfare. The ...
PublisherK Verlag2012
The Subjective Object engages with the controversial site of the ethnographic museum and the role of the archive. In particular, the 1920’s photographic archive of  from India by the German physical anthropologist and racist theorist Egon von Eickstedt (1892–1965) serves as a case study for an investigation into the role of historical artifacts in light of contemporary political situations. The nine interviews with curators, artists, anthropologists, and social workers provide the core of the book actively discussing the complicated issues around the archive’s function in producing knowledge. An annotated thread of images serves as a critical apparatus addressing the visual ...
PublisherThe Volume Project2016
The Lesson of Zoology first appeared in the trash heap of contemporary Lisbon. While researching the role of Lisbon’s Geographical Society in one of the first planetary colonizations, we happened upon an antiquarian bookshop with seemingly endless piles of natural history lithographs. Among them, The Lesson stood out as an especially compelling meta-image of just what a lesson is—an ordering of nature, by way of presentation, about who intended to possess the earth.
PublisherUrbanomic2019
Kristen Alvanson’s XYZT is a genre-busting collection of tales probing the complex relationship and cultural differences between the US and Iran, threaded along a speculative science fiction thriller plotline. Much of the novel is based on Alvanson’s years living in Iran, but in XYZT she reworks her experiences into myriad different styles, perspectives and genres ranging from the quotidian to the fabulous. In this interview with the author we talk to her about her time in Iran, the unconventional structure of XYZT, and the common threads between the novel and her work as a visual artist.

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