Index of Titles Filed Under 'Critical Theory'

PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation with Fabiola López-Durán is primarily structured around her work exploring Le Corbusier’s eugenic ideology from 1925 Paris to 1941 Vichy. At a moment when many events and debates are organized around his paradigmatic work, the main critiques seem to focus on his personal political engagement and ideology without fully engaging with the work and its consequences. What Fabiola proposes in her work is to take his claims for the orthopedic power of architecture seriously, and look at the vision of society it is therefore promoting. Although Le Corbusier’s example might be canonical, her argument is that the entire modernist ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2016
This second conversation of the series complementing the latest issue of The Funambulist Magazine dedicated to Design & Racism borrows its title from Audre Lorde’s words cited by Mabel O. Wilson at the beginning of the “Critical Dialogues on Race and Modern Architecture” that she organized at Columbia University in February 2016. Throughout this discussion, we talk about architecture’s historical and contemporary contribution to the American structural racism against Black bodies. Professor Mabel O. Wilson teaches architectural design and history/theory courses at Columbia University’s GSAPP. She is also appointed as a Research Fellow at the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) ...

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Publishercontinent.2018
What is without a doubt, however, is that this “Letter from the Editors” is the place to express wholehearted gratitude to the artists and writers who worked on making the Palais des Beaux Arts Wien a real thing over the past four years, and just as much, to those whose contributions expanded the scope of this volume – each part of a magic circle beneath the institutional surface, an experiment in institutional forms and collaborative practices located at an unmarked street corner in Wien...

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Publishere-flux2018
In Ursula Le Guin’s 1971 novel The Lathe of Heaven, a seemingly unassuming young white male begins effective dreaming. Desperate to stop altering realities by night, George Orr borrows other people’s pharmacy cards (the world is overpopulated, resources heavily rationed) to obtain more than his share of dexedrine and barbiturates. Landing himself in the hands of an oneirologist, he becomes a tool—a proxy to make the doctor’s megalomaniacal utilitarian fantasies real. The doctor suggests, and George dreams. “This was the way he had to go; he had no choice. He had never had any choice. He was only a dreamer.” Whose ...

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Martha Pazienti Caidan, Jeremy Greenspan, Lisa Blanning, et alSimon Reynolds, Holly Herndon, Kode9 , Tamar Shlaim, Logos , Tim Lawrence, Adam Harper
PublisherResident Advisor2017
Episode 343 of Resident Advisor magazine’s podcast series The Hour, featuring a discussion on the late writer and theorist Mark Fisher. We begin the latest edition of The Hour by asking Youngstar to tell us the story behind “Pulse X,” which is widely understood to be the first-ever grime track and is still massively influential, 15 years after its release. Next, Angus Finlayson speaks with some of the many people who were influenced by Mark Fisher, the greatly respected writer and theorist who we sadly lost back in January. For this moving tribute, Simon Reynolds, Holly Herndon, Kode9, Tamar Shlaim, Logos, Tim ...

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On Discipline is the sixth issue of a neW series Of publications issued by Wilfried Lentz Rotterdam. Published as an accompaniment to the show ‘On Discipline’. from 19 march to 23 april 2011 at Wilfried Lentz gallery. This publication is signed and numbered in an edition of 250 by Josef Dabernig.

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PublisherMute2014
Rejecting the dichotomy of centralism and horizontalism that has deeply marked millennial politics, Rodrigo Nunes’ close analysis of network systems demonstrates how organising within contemporary social and political movements exists somewhere between – or beyond – the two. Rather than the party or chaos, the one or the multitude, he discovers a ‘bestiary’ of hybrid organisational forms and practices that render such disjunctives false. The resulting picture shows how social and technical networks can and do facilitate strategic action and fluid distributions of power at the same time. It is by developing the strategic potentials that are already immanent to ...

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PublisherBuchs'n'Books2011
This book, to a certain extent, aims to open up a field of discussion about whether or not art in the twenty-first century can be relevant for society out- side the art world, and if so, how and where. We are now only at the begin- ning of this endeavor, but the direction, in my opinion, is already set: it is clear that criticality, resistance to economic instrumentalization, and a pro- ductive maintenance of autonomy as well as versatility will play a crucial role as parameters for artistic practices. Yet not only artists and cultural pro- ducers who act according ...

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PublisherSarai, CSDS2004
“The book itself has its genesis in the Crisis/Media Workshop that was jointly organized in Delhi by Sarai-CSDS, Delhi and the Waag Society, Amsterdam, a year ago in March 2003. The concept, outlined in the workshop publication by Shuddhabrata Sengupta and Geert Lovink, was a response to 9/11, the invasion of Afghanistan, the violence in Gujarat and the Kargil war. Over 3 days, participants from many different parts of South Asia and the world gathered to debate and dissect the relationship between the notion of crisis and the media, exactly one year after Gujarat had gone up in flames, and ...

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PublisherSarai, CSDS2006
If there were ever to be a ‘weather report’ for our times, an audit of the climate in which we have grown accustomed to live, it would use the word ‘turbulence’ often. We inhabit the vortex of storms, and smell sunshine. We are always prepared for rain. Our cities are sites of flood and fire. We live between tremors, power cuts and voltage surges. Agitations emerge and abate on our streets and on the airwaves, as if by accident. Books are burned, blogs are blocked, bourses dance mad tarantulas. We fly with seat belts fastened. Predictions are pronounced and dissembled ...

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PublisherSarai, CSDS2010
Modernity’s great promise – the freedom from fear, now lies in ruins. One can argue that this vision was always compromised – modernity (especially in the form that emerged in the West, under Capitalism) always hid its own fears, and hid from its own fears – the fear of epidemics, of urban panic, of the homeless multitude and of criminal activity. This led to a drive for transparency: for separating the civic from the criminal, the civilised and the barbaric peoples, the human from the non human, life from the machine. With the advent of the mass slaughters of the ...

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Alissa Walker is the urbanism editor at Curbed where she writes about cities, infrastructure, transportation, and policy. Before that, she was the urbanism editor at Gizmodo and has written extensively about design, cities, and architecture for places like Design Observer, Dwell, Fast Company, the Los Angeles Times and The New York Times. In this episode, Alissa and I talk about the differences between writing about designed objects and writing about the city, the role of the critic, and how she writes about government, policy, and transportation through the lens of design.

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James Goggin is a designer, educator, and writer. He runs his own design studio with his partner, Shan James, under the name Practise and recently joined the faculty of RISD’s graphic design department. He previously worked as Director of Design, Publishing and New Media at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and has taught at Werkplaats Typografie in Arnhem, The Netherlands, and at ECAL in Switzerland. His writing on design has appeared in numerous publications and he currently serves as art director and is on the editorial board of the architecture publication, Flat Out. In this episode, James and I ...

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Jessica Barness is a design theorist, educator, and writer whose research interests include interactive environments, sound, and critical practices. She’s currently an associate professor in the School of Visual Communication Design at Kent State University and her writing has appeared in Design and Culture, Visual Communication, Dialectic, and more. In this episode, Jessica and I talk about her career as a practicing designer before making the shift to academia, the state of design discourse, and the differences between critical design, critical making, and design research.

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Mark Lamster is the architectural critic of the Dallas Morning News, a Loeb Fellow at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and a professor in the architecture school at the University of Texas at Arlington. He’s the author of several books, and is currently finishing a biography of architect Philip Johnson. In this episode, Mark and I talk about how he started writing about architecture, how making books is like making architecture, what it’s like writing about architecture for a daily newspaper, and how technology is changing the role of the critic.

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Paola Antonelli is the senior curator of the Department of Architecture and Design and the Director of R&D at MoMA where she’s expanded the traditional definition of design by acquiring pieces like the @ sign, the original emoji set, and Minecraft. Originally trained as an architect, Antonelli has written and edited for publications like Domus, Metropolis, ID, and Harper’s Bazaar and was previously taught at the University of California and Harvard University Graduate School of Design. In this wide ranging episode, Paola and I talk about design as a methodology, the problems with design education, and why she wants to ...

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Theo Inglis is a freelance graphic designer and writer based in London. He is a recent graduate of the Critical Writing in Art and Design MA at The Royal College of Art and currently writes for Grafik and Monotype. In this episode, Theo and I talk about his recent MA thesis, An Absurd Machine: Branding, Design, and the City, how he got started writing while he was working as a designer, the types of design writing we want to see more of, and the differences between design criticism, theory, and journalism.

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PublisherTidal2012
When you’re sitting in jail, the topic of justice can’t help but come up. You work backward from sitting in your cell, to your ride in the police car with handcuffs, to when the police threw you face-first on the ground and applied said handcuffs. You ask how and why this all happened. And in your pain in your cage, someone tells you, incredibly, that it’s because you asked for it. It’s all in your social contract. As with any profound concept, this may take a while to digest. Connoisseurs of the brazen should at least admire the answer’s audacity. It’s ...

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PublisherTidal2012
The world ultimately comes down to dreams and their realization. So many dreams compete for our attention. There’s lottery-win dream, with its conjoined reveries of job-quitting and setting your o ce straight about what you think of everyone (or acquiring your company just to re them), which gives you time to buy your own bar so that you can drink for free and throw people out. Most spend years working through the permutations of the big win they will never have. Or there is the moment when your talent is finally revealed, after all these years, and the audience roars at ...

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PublisherTidal2013
Civilizations at their peak present curious spectacles. They ooze wealth and pride, produce fantastic art and technologies, all while shredding the foundations of their prosperity. Their citizens seem to believe they eclipse mundane restrictions of time and space. The monuments their predecessors have left in Rome, on Easter Island, in Egypt, in Venice, littered like warning beacons elsewhere throughout the world, demonstrate such faith may not match reality. A rock thrown skyward must believe, at the top of its arc, fleetingly, that it is flying…

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PublisherMonique Roelofs2018
Philosopher Monique Roelofs offers a digital object that is part open letter, part analysis of address, and part excerpt from her 2014 book The Cultural Promise of the Aesthetic, introducing us to her theory of aesthetic relationality. Created specifically for this Library Stack Collection, Roelofs’s morphing, experimental thing addresses the reader directly, encouraging us to “think for ourselves and take responsibility for gathering the tools we need in order to do that thinking.” In her metamorphosing gesture toward further streams of address, Roelofs brings together aesthetic experience with interpersonal modes of relation in an effort to speak to and in ...

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