Index of Titles Filed Under 'Cultural History'

PublisherTriple Canopy2019
“How could my grandmother have made millions from the antiquated traditions and ridiculous superstitions that I’d been so desperate to abandon?” An essay on the monetization of traditional Chinese medicine and failed promises of diaspora. “Aconite, My Roots,” by Henry Zhang is part of Resentment, the twenty-fifth issue of Triple Canopy, that is devoted to reclaiming—if not recuperating—resentment, especially as harbored by those who are used to fits of anger and bitterness being indicted as unproductive, petty, selfish, even pathological.
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
Proverbs for Decolonized Consciences Ali Jimale Ahmed is a Somali poet, cultural critic, short-story writer, and scholar. He is Professor and former chair of Comparative Literature at Queens College of the City University of New York, where he also teaches for the Africana Studies Program and the Department of Classical, Middle Eastern, and Asian Languages and Cultures; he is also on the Comparative Literature faculty at the CUNY Graduate center. His books include The Invention of Somalia (1995), Daybreak Is Near: Literature, Clans, and the Nation-State in Somalia (1996), Fear Is a Cow (2002), Diaspora Blues (2005), The Road Less Traveled: ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
Aboroginal Women’s Presence Amy McQuire is a Darumbal and South Sea Islander journalist and writer with 12 years experience in Aboriginal and independent media. She is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Queensland looking at media représentations of violence against Aboriginal women.
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
The House of Students of the Empire Ana Naomi de Sousa is a documentary filmmaker and writer, who works on spatial politics, identity, history and resistance.
Feminism today often feels bipolar. Focusing only on recent actions and reactions in the United States, it seems clear that, on the one hand, activist feminist movements such as MeToo and Time’s Up have helped spark a revolution in awareness about sexual harassment, sexual assault, and the larger forces of misogyny that have been long central to the consolidation of white patriarchal power. During Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation hearings, Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony about his alleged sexual assault of her in high school did not cancel his confirmation, but her testimony, broadcast live and in full, helped ignite more ...
PublisherCritical Inquiry2018
Looking Back to “The Climate of History: Four Theses.”
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
The Haitian Proclamation of Independence (January 1, 1804) Fania Noël is a Haitian-born, French Afrofeminist organizer, thinker, and writer. She is an experienced organizer in grassroots movements against racism, specifically anti-Blackness and Black feminism in France. In addition to being part of the Mwasi Afrofeminist Collective, she is the co-creator of the Decolonial Summer Camp, a five-day anti-racism training course in France. In 2014, she founded AssiégéEs (Besieged), a political publishing project led by women, queer and trans people of color.
PublisherTriple Canopy2019
“A fence’s integrity rests on its ability to enclose what one is unwilling or unable to offer.” Views from a performance of black fatherhood. “Fences” by Saretta Morgan is part of Resentment, the twenty-fifth issue of Triple Canopy, that is devoted to reclaiming—if not recuperating—resentment, especially as harbored by those who are used to fits of anger and bitterness being indicted as unproductive, petty, selfish, even pathological.
PublisherWomen on Airplanes2017
The idea of making use of spaces, transforming existing ones, creating new ones, making a living and a change, very much carries through the following pages. The importance to have, maintain, and organise places, frameworks, and opportunities that allow a continuity to negotiate and fight over common grounds. Making spaces vibratory. To imagine a restaurant or a nightclub in Manchester or London in the 1930s as a business proposition but at the same time as a safe space in which to conspire to liberate Africa; to imagine a restaurant as an art gallery—while working as a waitress—and proceeding to turn ...
PublisherThinkbelt2020
From its earliest use in the mandatory Jewish quarter of sixteenth century Venice to its association with Black segregated areas in postwar America, the term “ghetto” has held a variety of meanings and invoked myriad feelings. Daniel Schwartz traces the history of this controversial word.
PublisherThinkbelt2020
Architects, planners, and construction firms from socialist Eastern Europe shaped the urbanization of West Africa and the Middle East during the Cold War in ways we had not, until now, considered. Łukasz Stanek examines the strategic ambitions and sometimes contradictory motivations behind this global cooperation.
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
Indigenous Island Time Writer, musician and visual artist Coco Solid is Jessica Hansell, a Māori/Sāmoan/German artist from Auckland. Hansell started out making her own zines/comics and musically came up through underground punk and rap. She went on to form groups Parallel Dance Ensemble (Permanent Vacation, Germany), Badd Energy (Flying Nun, NZ) and 9-member rap collective Fanau Spa. Hansell also runs projects like Kuini Qontrol (an online hub for podcasts, music and club nights) and Equalise My Vocals (amplifying creative women, LGBTQI and decolonising voices in the Pacific). Hansell is the first woman to direct and write an adult cartoon in New ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
There is something significantly different to record a conversation about the politics of a given neighborhood in the calm of an office or in the neighborhood itself — even if the sock Léopold added to his microphone ultimately proves not to be the most efficient windbreak! We begin this important conversation with Colin Prescod in front of Grenfell Tower in North Kensington, London, two and a half years after the massive fire that killed 72 residents (predominantly members of the racialized working class) and displaced hundreds on June 14, 2017. Although the source of the fire was accidental, its propagation ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
Lakota Economy of Giving Kite aka Suzanne Kite is an Oglala Lakota performance artist, visual artist, composer, and a PhD candidate at Concordia University. She is currently a Research Assistant for the Initiative for Indigenous Futures and her research is concerned with contemporary Lakota philosophies through research-creation, computational media, and performance practice.
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
Decolonial and Accompanying Practices in Hawai’i Laurel Mei-Singh is assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of Hawai’i Mānoa. She is developing a book on military fences and grassroots struggles for land and livelihood in Wai‘anae, a rural and heavily militarized region of the island of O’ahu in Hawai’i. She is the author of “The Year of the Shark: Recognizing Those Who Reterritorialize Hawai’i,” in The Funambulist 13 Queers, Feminists, and Interiors (September-October 2017).
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
Priority to Indigenous Pleasures Léuli Eshrāghi, Sāmoan is an artist, a curator and a researcher, who intervenes in display territories to centre Indigenous presence and power, sensual and spoken languages, and ceremonial-political practices. Through performance, moving image, writing and installation, ia engages with Indigenous possibility as haunted by ongoing militourist and missionary violences that erase faʻafafine-faʻatama from kinship structures. Ia contributes to growing international critical practice across the Great Ocean and North America through residencies, exhibitions, publications, teaching and rights advocacy.
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
Imagining New Worlds with the Zapatistas Linda Quiquivix is a geographer and seed saver based in California. She places her university training at the service of under-resourced communities in the US, Mexico, and Palestine who seek clean water, land, and tools to build and strengthen their collective autonomies.
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
Navajo Decolonial Grief & Rage for Loreal Tsingine Melanie K. Yazzie (Diné) is an Assistant Professor of Native American Studies and American Studies at the University of New Mexico. She is also the 2019-2020 Cultural Desk for The Red Nation, a grassroots organization committed to the liberation of Indigenous people from colonialism and capitalism. She is also the guest editor (along with Nick Estes) of The Funambulist 20 (November-December 2019) Settler Colonialism in Turtle Island.
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
The Exotic Other Miriam Hillawi Abraham is a multi-disciplinary designer who hails from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Her work advocates for social justice through afrofuturism and intersectional feminism by creating playful dialogue, immersive experiences, mining artefacts from the future and constructing alternative realities.
PublisherTriple Canopy2019
An essay on posthumous caretaking. “My Existential Limits to the Rectification of Past Wrongs, Or, So If You See Me Crying, It’s Just a Sign That I’m Still Alive” by Tiona Nekkia McClodden is part of Risk Pool, the twenty-fourth issue of Triple Canopy, that asks: how are sickness and wellness defined, and by whom? What are the effects of these definitions, these acts of naming and describing?
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
Decolonial Fairy Tales & Object-Oriented Pedagogy Nay Saysourinho is a writer and literary critic. She was the first recipient of the Adina Talve-Goodman Fellowship from One Story Magazine. She is a regular contributor to the Ploughshares Blog. The daughter of Lao refugees, she was raised in the province of Québec and spent several years in Saskatchewan. Her writing explores food, nature and colonialism. She is currently working on her first novel —a modern fairy tale set in Southeast Asia— and an art project on Asian portraiture. She writes in French and English, and is based in Connecticut.
PublisherThe Funambulist2020
The Djabwurrung Embassy in Aboriginal Country Nish is a community organizer, sports coach and writer based on Kulin Nation territory in so called Melbourne of so-called Australia. He is a settler to these lands with a family history rooted in India and Fiji. He has been organizing with the collective Anti-Colonial Asian Alliance since early 2019 and volunteers with RISE: Refugees, Survivors and eX-detainees. His writing is featured in New Matilda and Junkee.

We use cookies to improve your experience on our site. Read our privacy policy to learn more. Accept

Join Our Mailing List