Index of Titles Filed Under 'Dark Ecology'

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PublisherInhabitants2015
Climatologists have confirmed it is now too late to avoid certain global warming and that a shift to a low or zero carbon economy is thus vital. This implies an urgent transition to renewable energy sources as well as radical adaptive measures, which collide against established industrial monopolies. This episode gathers several geoengineering patent applications, and through these documents presents the history of these emerging technologies and the private interests, actors, think tanks, and corporations behind them. Within the debate of climate change mitigation, geoengineering—the technological management of weather patterns and carbon capture processes—occupies an especially politicized place. It has slowly ...
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PublisherMeson Press2021
Simultaneously speculative and inspired by everyday experiences, this volume develops an aesthetics of metabolism that offers a new perspective on the human-environment relation, one that is processual, relational, and not dependent on conscious thought. In art installations, design prototypes, and research-creation projects that utilize air, light, or temperature to impact subjective experience the author finds aesthetic milieus that shift our awareness to the role of different sense modalities in aesthetic experience. Metabolic and atmospheric processes allow for an aesthetics besides and beyond the usually dominant visual sense.
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With the third symposium Women on Earth we were seeking to understand the relations between feminism and species coexistence. The issue of nature—and of all that is naturalized or deemed unnatural by hegemonic discourses and policy—is of particular importance to gender issues, as is science. But a scientific and technical approach to the climate emergency cannot be accurate without taking into consideration how gender, racial, and economic violence foster our emergent ecocides, nor by how women—often poor and Indigenous women—are overwhelmingly at the forefront of this violence as the very first recipients of. What kind of political and cultural transformation ...
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Even before 2017’s floods, fires and explicit nuclear threat, the doomsday clock had been ticking towards midnight, spurred on by the warming planet and the hothead in the White House. Survivalists have been around since the 1930s, but all of a sudden, prepping (making plans for civilizational annihilation) started to feel like the not-crazy thing to do. But how to go about it? Become a one-person militia and stock up on camo and bullets? If you’re a too-rich tech bro, you disrupt the apocalypse: get Lasik, build a panic room and buy an apartment in a luxury tower submerged below ...
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PublisherBarbara T. Smith2000
When first launched the Biosphere 2 was sold by the media to an eager public as crucial scientific research that would save us when the earth became uninhabitable.  This was easier then explaining the complicated fact that many of its central ideas had come from an avant-garde theater troupe. But these performative roots were mirrored by Barbara T. Smiths “21st Century Odyssey.”  When Smith’s boyfriend, Dr. Roy Walford, went into the Biosphere for two years she traveled around the world doing performances and communicating with him through then cutting-edge tech like faxes and video chat. While he and the other ...
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We affirm ourselves as the center of evolution by saving it from our own destruction. Our new heroism is to keep things, at best, as bad as they are. What does good even mean? We are the joke of evolution—and nobody’s laughing. Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with marine scientist Skye Morét and writer Ingo Niermann.
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Contemporary art almost invariably presents ideas and aesthetics on a symbolic, referential level, particularly when it concerns itself with ecological issues. What this means is that it tells a story that does not include its material realities in that story. The effect this has is that the artwork hides its own material use, social impact, energy use, and other conditions necessary for its production and reception. We need to understand what is at stake when an artwork’s primary form and mode of communication replicates the very problems of a society it reflects on.
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The third BKDN BKDN workbook is for facilitating Deep Listening sonic meditations with others to individually and collectively experience immersive ecological entanglement. The publication is a tool for sinking in to relationships you have with the world around you, helping to bypass the ways you have been taught to limit or ignore the subtleties of the more-than-human world you are immersed in. This workbook has been developed over the past decade through many experiments in Deep Listening sessions that I have facilitated. Since first being exposed to Deep Listening, I was interested in how it could create empathies with the ...
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Science has to generate output. Art has to cater to an audience. Could art and science join forces to free science from definite outputs and art from definite audiences? Or would art then also be measured by its outcome and science by its audience? Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with artists Julieta Aranda, Marco Roso, and Elena Mazzi.
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“The first episode Oceanizing History, emerged from a conversation with professor and curator Greg Dvorak. Author of the book Coral and Concrete: Remembering Kwajalein Atoll Between Japan, America, and the Marshall Islands (2018), Greg teaches at Waseda University in Tokyo and researches the postcolonial histories of Japan and the USA in Oceania. His work is related to his personal biography, spending part of his childhood on a US military base in Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The meeting with Greg took place in mid-April 2020, when the global lockdown was already becoming a new normal. He was in Tokyo ...
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The third episode of the Corona Under the Ocean chapter, featuring anthropology professor Cynthia Chou, is dedicated to the Orang Suku Laut, a nomadic community from the Malay world sea in Southeast Asia. Thanks to more than three decades of research, Cynthia Chou’s work brings us closer to the worldview and life practices of the Orang Suku Laut, for whom humans are just another element among the many creatures that inhabit oceans and land. Continually moved by the tides, their ancestral relationship with the environment not only puts many aspects of modern societies into question, but shows that another kind ...
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This episode, featuring marine biologist Marah J. Hardt, is dedicated to the vitalism and resilience of the ocean. Outlining her personal journey as a researcher, Marah J. Hardt provides a propositional critique of our relationship with the maritime environment, present but not always visible on a global scale. Understanding ocean research as a necessarily interdisciplinary practice, her scientific practice highlights the importance of storytelling as a tool for dissemination of ideas. In We are Ocean Life, she not only reminds us that all forms of life, including human life, come from the ocean, but also brings us closer to the ...

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