Index of Titles Filed Under 'Design'

◯ is a supercut of all round counters found in Unicode typefaces. Composed first in the summer of 2011 and updated for this 2013 publication, ? presents these counters at 60pts and in Unicode order. The text begins with Basic Latin (0025), contains findings in the Private Use Area, and ends in the Variation Sectors Supp. Section (1F773).

Read More

PublisherThe Serving Library2010
An expansive statement of intent, broadly concerned with Libraries, Media, and Time (though not necessarily in that order) Angie Keefer: AN OCTOPUS IN PLAN VIEW I. The etymology of the word “octopus” Octopus. Noun. A mollusk with eight sucker-bearing arms, a soft sac-like body, strong beak-like jaws, and no internal shell. A taxonomic genus within the family octopodidae. Origin: Greek, from OKTO-, meaning “eight,” plus -POUS, meaning “foot.” Plural: debatable. Rob Giampietro, David Reinfurt: FROM 1 TO 0 0: May I speak now? 1: Of course. I didn’t mean to get carried away, but— Dexter Sinister: A NOTE ON THE TIME The time right now is 2011 Feb ...

Read More

PublisherThe Serving Library2016
This issue is both *in* and *about* COLOR. Starting with ISSUE #10, we have reduced our format and we are printing in all of the available inks. The issue was published in time to inaugurate (finally!) our first physical space for The Serving Library in a storefront on the north side of the majestic India Buildings block in the heart of Liverpool’s once-colorful mercantile district. Bulletins around the edges of color come courtesy Lucas Benjamin on a green screen, Stuart Bertolotti-Bailey on ephemera, Umberto Eco on conditioning, Emily Gephart on a poetry hoax, James Langdon on kitchen cabinetry, Tamara Shopsin on swimming ...

Read More

PublisherThe Serving Library2012
  This issue doubles as a catalog-of-sorts to Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language, a group exhibition curated by Laura Hoptman at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, from May 6 to August 27, 2012. It is a *pseudo*-catalog in the sense that, other than a section of images at the back, it bears no direct relation to the works in the exhibition. Instead, the bulletins extend in different directions from the same title, and could be collectively summarized as preoccupied with the more social aspects of Typography. In this way we hope to throw some *glancing* light on the exhibition. For ...

Read More

PublisherStrelka Press2012
We live in an age of sticky problems, whether it’s climate change or the decline of the welfare state. With conventional solutions failing, a new culture of decision-making is called for. Strategic design is about applying the principles of traditional design to “big picture” systemic challenges such as healthcare, education and the environment. It redefines how problems are approached and aims to deliver more resilient solutions. In this short book, Dan Hill outlines a new vocabulary of design, one that needs to be smuggled into the upper echelons of power. He asserts that, increasingly, effective design means engaging with the ...

Read More

Publisher2012
CIVIL WAR| HOLOCAUST|PHOTOGRAPHS BLOODY, SEVERED LIMBS PILED UP. BEAUTIFUL FOREST VIEWS, LIGHT CASCADING THROUGH THE FOLIAGE, BATHING THE SKULLS AND BONES HAPHAZARDLY SCATTERED ON THE GROUND. THE WHIPPED AND SCARRED BACK OF A BLACK SLAVE, SITTING DOWN LIKE RODIN’S THINKER. WOUNDED SOLDIERS, THEIR EXPOSED BONES MUSHROOMING WITH INFECTED, PROLIFERATING FLESH. LEVELED MAIN STREETS IN DESTROYED CITIES. POST-BATTLE LANDSCAPES WITH UNDEFINED HORSEMEN IN THE BACKGROUND, RIDING AMONG WASTED NATURE AND DEAD BODIES. THE CORPSES LAY WITH THEIR FEET BOOTLESS, THEIR ARMS AKIMBO, THEIR MOUTHS OPEN. WALT WHITMAN DESCRIBED PRISONERS OF THE CIVIL WAR: “CAN THOSE BE MEN—THOSE LITTLE LIVID BROWN, ASH ...

Read More

Publisherdos-dos.org2017
dos focuses on conversations in, about, and with exhibitions. dos commissions and edits conversations between two visitors to an exhibition to emphasize subjective experience and meaning-making at large. dos conversations can be streamed, followed as an RSS feed, or accessed as a podcast. dos conjures their listeners as eavesdroppers and vicarious visitors who experience exhibitions on their own time, partaking in a continuum of physical experience and shared interpersonal thinking.

Read More

PublisherDesignFile2014
The Imaginary Brazil in contemporary Film, Fashion, and Design In Favelization, Kertzer sets out to understand the ways in which specific producers of contemporary Brazilian culture capitalized on misappropriations of the favela (informal squatter settlements that grow along the hillsides and lowlands of many Brazilian cities) in order to brand luxury items as “Brazilian.” Kertzer analyzes the the works of artists and designers citing instances of engagement with primitivism and stereotype to make their goods more desirable to a non-Brazilian audience. The author further argues that the processes of interpretation, aestheticization, transcendence, and domination are part of the favelization phenomenon. Originally ...

Read More

PublisherGlass Bead2017
The first issue of the journal was dedicated to repositioning art in the landscape of reason. This issue is focused on the fabric of reason itself, and to the ways in which it is currently altered by the emergence of artificial intelligence. While the capacities of thought are being externalized in machines that increasingly mirror human intelligence, the question of the technical artifactuality of mind and its political ramifications becomes particularly pressing. For us, far from being limited to the computational instantiation of intelligence, understanding the politics of these developments in artificialintelligence requires acknowledging that mind has always been artifactual. Site 1: Logic Gate, the Politics ...

Read More

How does change happen? Who authors design? How does architecture participate in modernization? How does architecture govern? Governing by design, this book suggests, is not simply a matter of monu­mental symbolism and space, state power and authority, imposed control and surveillance. This book instead sets architecture in relation to mundane mat­ters: food, bodies, housing, markets, cities, and culture. How do we regulate basic aspects of our lives through design, such as the consumption of food and shelter? How do we manage the risks of modernization to our bodies and environments? How is culture produced by politics, planning, and architecture? How ...

Read More

PublisherO-R-G2015
Multi is a (very) simple application for making and sending faces. Working from a limited stock of punctuation glyphs, Multi tirelessly assembles various configurations. Launch Multi. Tap the screen anywhere to stop. Tap again to start. Tap and drag on the right side to adjust the speed (a line appears under your finger — up for faster, down for slower). Save a particular face by pressing and holding your finger on the screen until you see a flash (like a screenshot). Continue holding down to text it to a friend. * Italian designer Enzo Mari spent the year 1957 drawing an apple. The result, ...

Read More

The symposium “Neurologics: Architecture Starting with the Brain” took place in the Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto on March 7–8, 2014. According to the brief, the event was organized to “consolidate the gains” of the “decade of the brain” and to raise the question, “what relevance do the discoveries of neuroscience have for architecture, a culture and discipline with its own matters of concern?” Many—although by no means all—papers presented at the conference were optimistic about the “gains” that such a neuroscientific perspective would provide. The text published here is a revised version ...

Read More

In my second conversation with Jessica Helfand — recorded earlier this month when Jessica was in Baltimore — we talk about Winterhouse (the studio she co-founded with William Drenttel), publishing, the role of design (and design criticism) in Trump’s America, and what she’s learned in her first semester teaching design at the Yale School of Management.

Read More

Michael Bierut needs no introduction. As a partner at Pentagram since 1990, he’s worked on projects ranging from logos and environmental signage systems, books and packaging for clients including Verizon, The New York Times, MIT Media Lab, and Hillary Clinton. But Michael is also a prolific writer, having co-founded Design Observer in 2003 and co-editing the Looking Closer series, and in this episode, I talk with Michael about that writing. We talk about the origins of Design Observer, how he started writing, and how the public’s growing awareness of graphic design has changed the discourse.

Read More

On this week’s episode, I talk with the designer and writer Michael Rock. Michael is the co-founder and creative director at 2×4, teaches at Yale and Columbia, and writes for The New York Times T Magazine. This summer, I visited Michael at 2×4’s New York headquarters to talk about his own history, how he thinks about his roles as a designer and writer, the importance of theory in design practice, and writing about design for a general audience.

Read More

In the first episode of Scratching the Surface, Jarrett talks with designer and writer Rob Giampietro. Rob is currently the Design Lead for Material Design at Google New York. In this conversation, we talk about how Rob approaches writing and designing, design as a critical activity, and the design writing he’d like to see more of.

Read More

Sara De Bondt is a designer, educator, and publisher. She runs her own independent design practice working with cultural clients and is the co-founder of Occasional Papers, a small publishing company focusing on publishing affordable books devoted to the histories of architecture, art, design, film, and literature. The Walker Art Center called Sara “the epitome of a cultural designer, combining a love of contemporary typography with a deep investigation into the history of graphic design. Through her design practice, which consists of client-based work, designing and editing books, and curating conferences, she is consistently contributing to the critical discourse.” In ...

Read More

Sara M. Watson is a technology critic and currently the writer in residence at Digital Asia Hub, a Research Fellow at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University, and an affiliate with the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. Last month, she published Toward a Constructive Technology Criticism, a meta-critique of technology criticism that’s very similar to what I’m thinking about with design criticism. In this episode, I talk to Sara about her piece and her thoughts on criticism, the similarities between writing about technology and design, and the role of criticism under a Trump ...

Read More

PublisherBOMB Magazine2015
Alfred Kallir’s fascination with the letter V begins in 1942 in London, after Winston Churchill’s famous “V is for victory” gesture. Born in Vienna in 1899, Kallir was a self-taught scholar whose research focused solely on the study of the alphabet. In his will, he drew up plans for an institution, called “V-Forum,” that would carry on his legacy, but one was never founded.

Read More

PublisherStrelka Press2014
As growth was the defining condition of the 20th century, so scarcity is set to define the 21st. Already it pervades political discourse and shapes our reading of the economy and the environment. But scarcity is not just the inevitable result of growth and resource exploitation – every innovation results in new scarcities. Scarcity is constructed daily through the creation of desire, it is designed. The authors of this timely essay set out to establish a more sophisticated understanding of scarcity. Moving beyond the idea that lack and inequality are simply laws of nature, they argue that scarcity can be ...

Read More

PublisherLiverpool Biennial2016
The noisy buzz of the mains electricity power supply has been one of our urban environment’s most persistent background noises. One day in 1996 Dr Catalin Grigoras realised that the electricity wasn’t just making noise, but in fact singing… The UK national electrical grid delivers power across the country. This mains power supply makes a constant humming sound, yet there are tiny changes to the frequency of this sound every second. Most recordings made in the UK have a trace of mains hum on them and this can be forensically analysed to determine the time and date they were made, and ...

Read More

PublisherUrbanomic2013
This short introduction to the 2012 discussion event with Giuseppe Longo and Benedict Singleton sketches out the theoretical positions of the two contributors and the common threads of the discussion

Read More

PublisherUrbanomic2015
In this episode of Urbanomic’s Yarncast series, strategist Benedict Singleton discusses the longstanding suspicion of design as a practice of illicit manipulation, the concept of the trap, and the difference between plots and plans.

Read More

PublishersO-R-GHalmos2015
Time is like that — both point AND duration. This is how it can bend and warp. A week, a second, a season: all are specific and discrete, but none are the same. The present can be cut to any number of lengths, from a single electric pulse of an electronic circuit to the display period of a digital timepiece. Wyoscan is a reverse-engineered clock. It has been programmed to slowly render the current time from left to right, scanning across the screen, completing 1 cycle every 2 seconds (0.5 hz). You’ll notice that reading this clock requires more attention than usual, ...

Read More