Index of Titles Filed Under 'Environment'

PublisherThe Distance Plan2015
“…And I was like—yes it is! Part of my broader project as an artist is thinking about how the term climate change can be redefined and expanded to enable people to understand its relevance. So climate change is redefined as an issue of inequality, or social justice, and also urban design and planning. So if I go by that broader definition, I don’t see why I should exclude those things here.” Amy Howden-Chapman in conversation with the Newspaper Reading Club, 2015

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PublisherThe Funambulist2013
Each architecture that was thought as a physical implementation of private property contains already in itself the potential for containment in a legal situation like the one of quarantine. David Garcia talks about the origins of such a situation, its territorialization (lazaretto, Ellis Island etc.) as well as its application on bodies, but also on entire landscapes like in Chernobyl and Fukushima. We discuss about Michel Foucault’s definition of biopolitics through the historical example of the quarantined city that suffers from the plague, as well as David’s own architectural projects in response to the various problems tackle by quarantine. David Garcia ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
The Dalieh of Raouche is a large publicly accessible rock situated at the extremity of West Beirut peninsula (see map and photos below). Like many coastal sites in Lebanon, it is currently the object of a private development plan, which tackles many questions about legal property, as well as social, ecological, and archaeological preservation. In December 2014, the Civil Campaign to Protect the Dalieh of Raouche wrote an open-letter to Rem Koolhaas, the master-planner of the project, in order to raise this questions in the public debate. This letter was shared at a scale that went beyond the sole city ...

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PublisherDroste Effect2019
The legend says that coffee was introduced in the Austrian Empire after the end of the Siege of Vienna in 1683. On that occasion, Turkish troops left behind several sacks of «strange» beans while leaving the city. It is said that the soldiers of the Austrian army were impressed as they smelled the fragrance of the beans thrown on a fire. In reality, this is nothing more than a legend, but it is interesting to note that in the story the fascination with coffee starts by chance, even though it is not by chance that coffee started ruling the world, ...

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… is an ensemble which contends that the meaning of the Anthropocene is less a geological re-formation than it is trans-formation of both land and animal; once exposed to some of the parameters defining this transition, the reader-as-exhibition-viewer may begin to discern erratic rhythms generated by the creatures of nonconformity that inhabit, with their violence, struggles, and love the vast, machinic reality called Earth.

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with David Gissen uses his two book Subnature and Manhattan Atmospheres in order to demystify the politically charged romanticism of a “green” nature. We talk about the unwanted matter of architecture: dust, puddles, debris, exhaust as components of a subnature that carry in them more ambiguous socio-political narratives than the marketable greenness. The second part of the conversation is particularly attached to the history of the atmospheric urbanity of Manhattan, before we end by introducing David’s project (see below) to reproduce the mound of dirt of the 1871 Paris Commune on which the Vendôme Column had been ceremonially destroyed. David Gissen is associate professor ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Alysabeth Alexander and I recorded this conversation a few hours before the Service Employees International Union (in which she has important responsibilities) filed a lawsuit against the city of San Francisco, Google and Apple for deliberately ignoring the environmental impact that the tech industry buses (aka google buses) have on the Californian city in their daily use. The environmental aspect of the buses is the one that has been chosen for the lawsuit, yet the main political consequence of their very function is the rampant gentrification that accompany their routes. In this conversation, Alysabeth describes the various actions that the ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Lucia Jalón Oyarzun and I share a fascination for the act of cartographying. In this conversation, we establish the impossibility for a map to live by the status of objectivity that the common understanding of it comprises. We look at cartographies accomplished by her students or by Peter Greenaway in his film A Walk Through H. (1978), which, on the contrary, embrace their subjectivity. This embrace is often characterized by their modus operandi that creates these maps through a dimensioning accomplished directly by the body, the body being what is subjected by the spaces that these cartographies describe. Lucia Jalón Oyarzun is an architect by the ...

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PublisherThe Distance Plan2013
The first issue of The Distance Plan journal outlines an idea: that distance is a useful metaphor for talking about climate change. It contains essays, an interview and artworks which speculate on the possibilities, and implications, of this image of distance. Published at a time when popular awareness of climate change – particularly in the context of the arts – was significantly underrepresented, this journal primarily sought to heighten visibility and stimulate discussion.

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PublisherThe Distance Plan2014
The Distance Plan, Journal Issue 2, 2014 ‘Seven Conversations,’ The Distance Plan Journal’s second issue, is intended as a place to record the shifts in dialogue and language related to art and climate change. The texts span a range of subjects; each includes someone involved in the arts: writers, curators, artists, teachers. Our hope is that by cataloguing our communities’ changing concerns when it comes to talking about climate change we can play the role of witnesses, help to sustain the momentum which already exists towards combating this problem, and motivate each other to move the discussion forward. These conversations ...

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PublisherThe Distance Plan2015
The Distance Plan, Journal Issue 3, 2015 ‘Climate and Precarity’, The Distance Plan Journal’s third issue, sets out to survey how migration, environmental crisis and climate activism are debated in relation to capitalism and its alternatives. Taking Judith Butler’s notion of precarity – the destruction of the conditions of liveability – as a starting point, the issue brings together texts and artist pages that speak about the relationship between ecological and economic precarity. A recurring question is how climate change is most effectively represented as an issue of social justice, and the role of artists and thinkers in developing a critical ...

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PublisherThe Distance Plan2016
This issue features artist pages by Louise Menzies and Michala Paludan, an essay by Lina Moe on the closure of New York’s L Line, and, through our ongoing Climate Change & Art: A Lexicon, surveys the language currently surrounding anthropogenic climate change. Through proposing neologisms and promoting less well-known terms, we wish to propel interdisciplinary discussion, and by extension accelerate the pace of action. Through this lexicon we propose that the science around climate change is developing so rapidly that we need new language to articulate its processes and effects. The lexicon is also based on the recognition that evolving science ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
For many years, Stuart Elden has thoroughly examined the concept of territory. In order to enter into this quasi-exhaustive research, I invited him to talk about the idea of volumetric territory, both in general and in the specific case of the occupied Palestinian territories. We borrow the notion of “politics of verticality” from Eyal Weizman in order to describe how sovereignty enforces itself onto subterranean, surface, and atmospheric spaces. Later, we use the work of Paul Virilio and Claude Parent and their architectural concept of oblique to challenge our common perception of territories in their flat cartographic interpretation. Finally, we discuss ...

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