Index of Titles Filed Under 'Environment'

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PublisherAccattone2019
Accattone #6 explores a renewed relationship with land, matter, ‘nature’ and localities against the backdrop of the new climatic regime. Situated at the intersection of architecture, representation and editorial-curatorial practices, the magazine is also permeated by a continuous research on methods and forms of practice. In particular, this issue addresses the use of film-making as a tool to foster and disseminate architectural positions; editorial devices and contents used by fellow little magazines; and the representation of nature in research, artistic and design practices. This issue is based on meetings and conversations that took place over the past year. Driven by ...
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In 2016 the Aerocene Foundation was invited to Exhibition Road for an interdisciplinary artistic project co-produced by members of the Exhibition Road Cultural Group: a partnership of the leading cultural and educational institutions in London, among them Serpentine Galleries, Imperial College London and The Natural History Museum. Between October and December 2016, the Aerocene Foundation activated a collaborative research platform between Exhibition Road members and wider communities by organizing two hackathons and the ‘Aerocene Campus’ in which participants engaged in debates on metabolic, social and environmental dimensions of the Aerocene epoch. During this period, experts as well as developers, designers, artists, ...
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PublisherThe Distance Plan2015
“…And I was like—yes it is! Part of my broader project as an artist is thinking about how the term climate change can be redefined and expanded to enable people to understand its relevance. So climate change is redefined as an issue of inequality, or social justice, and also urban design and planning. So if I go by that broader definition, I don’t see why I should exclude those things here.” Amy Howden-Chapman in conversation with the Newspaper Reading Club, 2015
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PublisherThe Funambulist2013
Each architecture that was thought as a physical implementation of private property contains already in itself the potential for containment in a legal situation like the one of quarantine. David Garcia talks about the origins of such a situation, its territorialization (lazaretto, Ellis Island etc.) as well as its application on bodies, but also on entire landscapes like in Chernobyl and Fukushima. We discuss about Michel Foucault’s definition of biopolitics through the historical example of the quarantined city that suffers from the plague, as well as David’s own architectural projects in response to the various problems tackle by quarantine. David Garcia ...
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We affirm ourselves as the center of evolution by saving it from our own destruction. Our new heroism is to keep things, at best, as bad as they are. What does good even mean? We are the joke of evolution—and nobody’s laughing. Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with marine scientist Skye Morét and writer Ingo Niermann.
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Science has to generate output. Art has to cater to an audience. Could art and science join forces to free science from definite outputs and art from definite audiences? Or would art then also be measured by its outcome and science by its audience? Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with artists Julieta Aranda, Marco Roso, and Elena Mazzi.
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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
The Dalieh of Raouche is a large publicly accessible rock situated at the extremity of West Beirut peninsula (see map and photos below). Like many coastal sites in Lebanon, it is currently the object of a private development plan, which tackles many questions about legal property, as well as social, ecological, and archaeological preservation. In December 2014, the Civil Campaign to Protect the Dalieh of Raouche wrote an open-letter to Rem Koolhaas, the master-planner of the project, in order to raise this questions in the public debate. This letter was shared at a scale that went beyond the sole city ...
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“The first episode Oceanizing History, emerged from a conversation with professor and curator Greg Dvorak. Author of the book Coral and Concrete: Remembering Kwajalein Atoll Between Japan, America, and the Marshall Islands (2018), Greg teaches at Waseda University in Tokyo and researches the postcolonial histories of Japan and the USA in Oceania. His work is related to his personal biography, spending part of his childhood on a US military base in Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The meeting with Greg took place in mid-April 2020, when the global lockdown was already becoming a new normal. He was in Tokyo ...
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The third episode of the Corona Under the Ocean chapter, featuring anthropology professor Cynthia Chou, is dedicated to the Orang Suku Laut, a nomadic community from the Malay world sea in Southeast Asia. Thanks to more than three decades of research, Cynthia Chou’s work brings us closer to the worldview and life practices of the Orang Suku Laut, for whom humans are just another element among the many creatures that inhabit oceans and land. Continually moved by the tides, their ancestral relationship with the environment not only puts many aspects of modern societies into question, but shows that another kind ...
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The fourth episode of the Corona Under the Ocean series, with agent of healing and artist Tabita Rezaire, is dedicated to the memory of water and its existence in flow within bodies. Water has Memory is the result of an intimate, personal, and mostly unscripted conversation between Tabita Rezaire and Sonia Fernandez Pan. It even includes environmental elements, such as rain, showing how words, feelings, and ideas are also part of the flow of life that circulates through bodies. The great connecting element of this conversation is water, understood beyond its usual contexts to think through connections and interactions including ...
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This episode, featuring marine biologist Marah J. Hardt, is dedicated to the vitalism and resilience of the ocean. Outlining her personal journey as a researcher, Marah J. Hardt provides a propositional critique of our relationship with the maritime environment, present but not always visible on a global scale. Understanding ocean research as a necessarily interdisciplinary practice, her scientific practice highlights the importance of storytelling as a tool for dissemination of ideas. In We are Ocean Life, she not only reminds us that all forms of life, including human life, come from the ocean, but also brings us closer to the ...
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PublisherSculpture Center2016
On a menu, octopus, scallop, lobster, shark, and crab mean one thing, and when brushing up against your leg in the ocean, another. In Cosima von Bonin’s work, they resemble oversized stuffed toys, approachable and perhaps even friendly. The hermit crab in LACANCAN, 2010, slumps on the slats beneath the seat of a lifeguard chair and faces two microphones. His audience awaits a speech, or warning, but he remains silent. Like all of von Bonin’s sea creatures, he has invaded a space of human recreation that is normally off-limits. Though he seems to be having a good time doing so, ...

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