Index of Titles Filed Under 'Environment'

PublisherThe Distance Plan2015
“…And I was like—yes it is! Part of my broader project as an artist is thinking about how the term climate change can be redefined and expanded to enable people to understand its relevance. So climate change is redefined as an issue of inequality, or social justice, and also urban design and planning. So if I go by that broader definition, I don’t see why I should exclude those things here.” Amy Howden-Chapman in conversation with the Newspaper Reading Club, 2015
PublisherThe Funambulist2013
Each architecture that was thought as a physical implementation of private property contains already in itself the potential for containment in a legal situation like the one of quarantine. David Garcia talks about the origins of such a situation, its territorialization (lazaretto, Ellis Island etc.) as well as its application on bodies, but also on entire landscapes like in Chernobyl and Fukushima. We discuss about Michel Foucault’s definition of biopolitics through the historical example of the quarantined city that suffers from the plague, as well as David’s own architectural projects in response to the various problems tackle by quarantine. David Garcia ...
Science has to generate output. Art has to cater to an audience. Could art and science join forces to free science from definite outputs and art from definite audiences? Or would art then also be measured by its outcome and science by its audience? Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with artists Julieta Aranda, Marco Roso, and Elena Mazzi.
PublisherThe Funambulist2015
The Dalieh of Raouche is a large publicly accessible rock situated at the extremity of West Beirut peninsula (see map and photos below). Like many coastal sites in Lebanon, it is currently the object of a private development plan, which tackles many questions about legal property, as well as social, ecological, and archaeological preservation. In December 2014, the Civil Campaign to Protect the Dalieh of Raouche wrote an open-letter to Rem Koolhaas, the master-planner of the project, in order to raise this questions in the public debate. This letter was shared at a scale that went beyond the sole city ...
“The first episode Oceanizing History, emerged from a conversation with professor and curator Greg Dvorak. Author of the book Coral and Concrete: Remembering Kwajalein Atoll Between Japan, America, and the Marshall Islands (2018), Greg teaches at Waseda University in Tokyo and researches the postcolonial histories of Japan and the USA in Oceania. His work is related to his personal biography, spending part of his childhood on a US military base in Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The meeting with Greg took place in mid-April 2020, when the global lockdown was already becoming a new normal. He was in Tokyo ...
The third episode of the Corona Under the Ocean chapter, featuring anthropology professor Cynthia Chou, is dedicated to the Orang Suku Laut, a nomadic community from the Malay world sea in Southeast Asia. Thanks to more than three decades of research, Cynthia Chou’s work brings us closer to the worldview and life practices of the Orang Suku Laut, for whom humans are just another element among the many creatures that inhabit oceans and land. Continually moved by the tides, their ancestral relationship with the environment not only puts many aspects of modern societies into question, but shows that another kind ...
The eighth episode, with professor and anthropologist Elizabeth Povinelli, begins with her idea of axioms of existence, which put in crisis the abstract and universalist condition of Western philosophy. The ocean is not far from Western epistemologies and ontologies. In fact, it is totally entangled in them thanks to their intimate—and strategically invisible—relationship with colonial history and violence. The notion of geontopower, coined by Povinelli, critically revises the Foucauldian notion of biopower. The fictional but real frontier between life and non-life is a political frontier in continuous expansion, even beyond Earth. This podcast is the result of a conversation between ...
The seventh episode, with curator Camila Marambio is an approach to Tierra del Fuego from her personal experience with a part of the world with which she has a strong emotional connection. As she states, Tierra del Fuego, “despite its remoteness, is the center of the world”. Karokynka is the name by which this area of the world is known by the native Selk’nam people, a culture that still survives in its descendants despite its official death by the modern state of Chile. The fact of proclaiming as dead, a culture that is still very much alive, is part of ...
The fifth episode of the Corona Under the Ocean series, featuring feminist philosopher Astrida Neimanis, puts into practice one of the author’s methodologies: “thinking with water.” As a material, water not only enables a relational ontology when thinking about the reality that bodies inhabit and produce, but also allows for an understanding of feminism that transcends the human and incorporates a planetary and intersectional scale where race, class, and gender are in constant intra-action. This podcast is the result of a conversation between Astrida Neimanis and Sonia Fernández Pan, where the Covid-19 pandemic was also a constant, an atmospheric condition ...
The sixth episode, with writer, lecturer, and curator Filipa Ramos is an approach to cinema from the ocean and to the ocean from cinema. Beyond the production of underwater images, there is a political relationship between cinema and the underwater world. As vision devices, the projection room and the tank or aquarium are related in their production of the fiction of a safe environment for the human being. Moreover, there are aquatic creatures capable of producing cinematic images, allowing an expansion of the concept of cinema beyond its own history and human history. This podcast is the result of a ...
The fourth episode of the Corona Under the Ocean series, with agent of healing and artist Tabita Rezaire, is dedicated to the memory of water and its existence in flow within bodies. Water has Memory is the result of an intimate, personal, and mostly unscripted conversation between Tabita Rezaire and Sonia Fernandez Pan. It even includes environmental elements, such as rain, showing how words, feelings, and ideas are also part of the flow of life that circulates through bodies. The great connecting element of this conversation is water, understood beyond its usual contexts to think through connections and interactions including ...
This episode, featuring marine biologist Marah J. Hardt, is dedicated to the vitalism and resilience of the ocean. Outlining her personal journey as a researcher, Marah J. Hardt provides a propositional critique of our relationship with the maritime environment, present but not always visible on a global scale. Understanding ocean research as a necessarily interdisciplinary practice, her scientific practice highlights the importance of storytelling as a tool for dissemination of ideas. In We are Ocean Life, she not only reminds us that all forms of life, including human life, come from the ocean, but also brings us closer to the ...
PublisherDroste Effect2019
The legend says that coffee was introduced in the Austrian Empire after the end of the Siege of Vienna in 1683. On that occasion, Turkish troops left behind several sacks of «strange» beans while leaving the city. It is said that the soldiers of the Austrian army were impressed as they smelled the fragrance of the beans thrown on a fire. In reality, this is nothing more than a legend, but it is interesting to note that in the story the fascination with coffee starts by chance, even though it is not by chance that coffee started ruling the world, ...
Our nature inclines us to listen to stories, not to lists, charts, and equations. To change our mind, we need a compelling narrative that turns obstacles into challenges and chances into hopes. The role of art is to foster that transformation, but also to spoil it wherever it’s lame. Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with artists Lena Maria Thüring and Teresa Solar.
A book of theory, essays, stories, and poems released in association with the exhibition Hyperobjects at Ballroom Marfa, which explores the overwhelming scale of today’s ecological crisis.
We tried to free ourselves from nature but exploited it to the point of self-destruction. Nature seems to have brought us back, but we actually never left. We just forgot about nature—including our very own. Listen to Chus Martínez, head of the Art Institute in Basel, Markus Reymann, director of TBA21–Academy, and marine scientist Skye Morét.
… is an ensemble which contends that the meaning of the Anthropocene is less a geological re-formation than it is trans-formation of both land and animal; once exposed to some of the parameters defining this transition, the reader-as-exhibition-viewer may begin to discern erratic rhythms generated by the creatures of nonconformity that inhabit, with their violence, struggles, and love the vast, machinic reality called Earth.
If it’s already difficult to protect nature in our own country, how do we protect nature in the extraterritorial sea? And who is there to protect the nature—and the people—of a country that is disappearing into the sea? Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with Francesca Mussi, a researcher in international law.
We can’t exist beyond nature but science can? Now that we’re doomed, can we at least free science from us? Is the era of a true, posthuman science about to begin or will science be destroyed by our vain efforts to save ourselves? Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with marine scientist Marzia Rovere and geneticist Alexander Tarakhovsky.
PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with David Gissen uses his two book Subnature and Manhattan Atmospheres in order to demystify the politically charged romanticism of a “green” nature. We talk about the unwanted matter of architecture: dust, puddles, debris, exhaust as components of a subnature that carry in them more ambiguous socio-political narratives than the marketable greenness. The second part of the conversation is particularly attached to the history of the atmospheric urbanity of Manhattan, before we end by introducing David’s project (see below) to reproduce the mound of dirt of the 1871 Paris Commune on which the Vendôme Column had been ceremonially destroyed. David Gissen is associate professor ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Alysabeth Alexander and I recorded this conversation a few hours before the Service Employees International Union (in which she has important responsibilities) filed a lawsuit against the city of San Francisco, Google and Apple for deliberately ignoring the environmental impact that the tech industry buses (aka google buses) have on the Californian city in their daily use. The environmental aspect of the buses is the one that has been chosen for the lawsuit, yet the main political consequence of their very function is the rampant gentrification that accompany their routes. In this conversation, Alysabeth describes the various actions that the ...
The story of Centralia teaches us the interrelatedness of cultural, social, and political agents and the long-lasting environmental impacts of resource extraction for the sake of economic growth. Seams of anthracite coal below Centralia extend far beyond the limits of the borough. The process of mining should be considered an act of underground urbanization, which impacts nature and the environment to a degree we are just now beginning to understand. Only a few boreholes remain as visual markers of the environmental tragedy. These hypodermic needles provided information to scientists about the environmental conditions of the coal veins. Today, most of ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Lucia Jalón Oyarzun and I share a fascination for the act of cartographying. In this conversation, we establish the impossibility for a map to live by the status of objectivity that the common understanding of it comprises. We look at cartographies accomplished by her students or by Peter Greenaway in his film A Walk Through H. (1978), which, on the contrary, embrace their subjectivity. This embrace is often characterized by their modus operandi that creates these maps through a dimensioning accomplished directly by the body, the body being what is subjected by the spaces that these cartographies describe. Lucia Jalón Oyarzun is an architect by the ...
We affirm ourselves as the center of evolution by saving it from our own destruction. Our new heroism is to keep things, at best, as bad as they are. What does good even mean? We are the joke of evolution—and nobody’s laughing. Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with marine scientist Skye Morét and writer Ingo Niermann.
PublisherThe Distance Plan2013
The first issue of The Distance Plan journal outlines an idea: that distance is a useful metaphor for talking about climate change. It contains essays, an interview and artworks which speculate on the possibilities, and implications, of this image of distance. Published at a time when popular awareness of climate change – particularly in the context of the arts – was significantly underrepresented, this journal primarily sought to heighten visibility and stimulate discussion.

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