Index of Titles Filed Under 'Field Recording'

PublisherGruenrekorder2008
Field Notes is concerned with the phenomenon of sound from varied perspectives: artists, musicians, journalists and scientists. They add to Field Notes with their essays, interviews, travelogues, anecdotes, notes and picture series. This first issue features six articles written by Costa Gröhn, Tanja Hemm, Christoph Korn, Stefan Militzer, Marcus Obst ( aka Dronæment), and Aaron Ximm (aka Quiet American).

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PublisherGruenrekorder2009
Our second issue features Marcus Kürten’s interview with the passionate phonographer Walter Tilgner, the second and final part of Stefan Militzer’sessay about “Tones, Sounds and Noises,” a collection of old Chinese texts regarding silence and noise – compiled by sound artist Lin Chi-Wei –, anecdotes by Yannick Dauby regarding his recording and hearing experiences with frogs as well as thoughts and reports based on Gabi Schaffner’s personal experiences with accidentally deleted or never recorded sounds from Finland. The magazine closes with an essay of the componist and sound artist Andreas Bick regarding the construction of meaningful correlations when listening – “listening is making sense.”

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PublisherGruenrekorder2012
Traces begins with Tom Lawrence’s fascinating and soon unsettling insights into Ireland’s largest wetland Pollardstown Fen and its ongoing destruction through men. Furthermore he describes his elaborate attempt to record the fen’s rich world of water beetles and talks about the startling discoveries he’s made. ♦ Regarding the question ‘Phonography: Art or Documentation?’ sculptor Scott Sherk examines the history of photography and its parallels to the developing world of phonography via selected historical imagery. ♦ From moments of excited listening in his childhood Jim Cummings carries us to the founding of his label EarthEar and his eventual step into scientific fields with the Acoustic Ecology Institute. ♦ ‘Something which lasts, passes by’ is Marcus Kürten’s ...

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Publishercontinent2017
What would a conversation with a piece of asbestos, or a piece of plastic stranded on the shore of the Schuylkill River be like? And how could a conversation transpire, between things and researchers and other things, if they landed in the same place and found for themselves a common language? Imprinted by Philadelphia’s singular industrial and technological history, the soils, water systems, and infrastructures of the Delaware Valley tell a story of the Anthropocene, the contentious and debated terminology for this “new” and anthropocentric geological era in which human activities have forever altered Earth’s ecosystems. For the Anthropocene Campus Philadelphia ...

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