Index of Titles Filed Under 'Historiography'

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PublisherFiktion2016
Amanda Susan Marie Hollis has been given the task of archiving the life of a work-shy librarian who worked at Harvard shortly after it was founded. The entanglements of history and life prove extremely hazardous and full of criminal misdeeds. What have the conquest of America, the Vinland Map, Mongolian hordes, Spanish monks, and the disappearance of a chandelier got to do with one another? Is Hollis a brilliant researcher or is she going nuts? Is there a truth beyond what can be archived? Nenik’s novel reads as a phantasmagoric prehistory of Google. Coin-Operated History has been translated from the ...
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PublisherZer0 Books2010
From the repurposed rubble of salvagepunk to undead hordes banging on shopping mall doors, from empty waste zones to teeming plagued cities, Combined and Uneven Apocalypse grapples with the apocalyptic fantasies of our collapsing era. Moving through the films, political tendencies, and recurrent crises of late capitalism, Evan Calder Williams paints a black toned portrait of the dream and nightmare images of a global order gone very, very wrong. Situating itself in the defaulting financial markets of the present, Combined and Uneven Apocalypse glances back toward a messy history of zombies, car wrecks, tidal waves, extinction, trash heaps, ...
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Publishere-flux2020
It’s yet uncertain what the lasting legacy of 2020 will be. “The tradition of the oppressed teaches us,” Walter Benjamin wrote in 1940, “that the ‘state of emergency’ in which we live is not the exception but the rule.” We already know that in the US, the summer of 2020 will be remembered for its sustained state of emergency, when we emerged from stratified isolation and convened, in the millions, in the streets to affirm that black lives matter, that black breath is stolen at an overwhelmingly higher scale by the pandemic and by the largely extralegal military organization known ...
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Publishere-flux2020
On the occasion of the Taipei Biennial 2020 and together with the Taipei Fine Arts Museum (TFAM), this special issue of e-flux journal will also be available to read in Chinese in 2021. Titled “You and I Don’t Live on the Same Planet,” the issue deals with an increasingly pressing situation: people “around” the world no longer agree on what it means to live “on” earth—to such a radical extent that the foundational material and existential categories of “earth” and “world” are profoundly destabilized. It was often said at the beginning of Trump’s time in office that he had no ...
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This publication accompanies the exhibition The End of Money (22 May – 7 August 2011), curated by Juan A. Gaitán, assisted by Amira Gad, at Witte de With, Center for Contemporary Art (Rotterdam, The Netherlands). The book includes a number of contributions that extend the exhibition proper beyond its self-contained existence in the gallery space. In this respect, it is also a vehicle through which the exhibition can find different discursive grounds for exploring the theme of the end of money, both as a literary and as an iconographic motif. Beyond the aforementioned essays by Dessislava Dimova, Donatien Grau, and ...
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PublisherMeson Press2015
“Technologists only change the world in various ways in generalized indifference; the point is to think the world and interpret the changes in its unfathomability, to perceive and experience the difference binding being to the nothing.” Anticipating the age of planetary technology Kostas Axelos, a Greek-French philosopher, approaches the technological question in this book, first published in 1966, by connecting the thought of Karl Marx and Martin Heidegger. Marx famously declared that philosophers had only interpreted the world, but the point was to change it. Heidegger on his part stressed that our modern malaise was due to the forgetting of being, ...
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PublisherLibrary Stack2019
MILTON FANGLINN: My name is Milton Fanglinn. I don’t teach, no. I work in the antiquities industry as a kind of. . . well let’s say a freelance scholar. I run a small consulting business, first out of New York but now from London, authenticating and researching the provenance of ancient objects in the field. Most of these don’t things have paper- work, or known owners, and are probably never going to be seen by the public. I have worked discreetly for many of the finest museums in the world, none of which would ever want its competitors to know ...
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PublisherLateral Addition2014
Music for The Memphis Group was written in late 2013, inspired by the Milan design collective of the same name. The work produced by the association of international artists – active between the years 1981 and 1987 – playfully engaged in hypothetical and pragmatic applications (furniture, apparel, sculpture, kitchenware) for emerging global resources, both synthetic and organic, rare and commonplace. The loud colors, plastic laminate, and asymmetrical patterning was intended in part as a rejection of dominant Modernist aesthetic ideals of the time – ideals that still hold over today in contemporary attitudes concerning clean, “essentialist” design. The Memphis Group’s willful, ...
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PublishersKadistBétonsalon2015
In echo of their respective programs, Kadist Art Foundation and Bétonsalon – Centre for Art and Research are launching the joint publication Qalqalah, a “reader” gathering contributions from artists and researchers on a variety of interlinked issues. The name Qalqalah is taken from a text by Cairo-based curator Sarah Rifky. In the text, the eponymous heroine, living in the near future, gradually loses her memory in a world where notions of language, art and economy have quietly collapsed. In this world of reconstituted, fluid knowledge, which inspires a mixture of hope and fear, the meaning of the Arabic name Qalqalah ...
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In Episode Four, we talk about the algorithmic potential of storytelling. Artists Stephanie Dinkins and Stan Douglas discuss how they use the language of photography, surveillance, and AI to narrate different pasts and imagine different futures. Dinkins draws upon her own life experience, while Douglas incorporates moments from British history.
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PublisherICA Miami2022
The focus of this first season is the ocean as a source of knowledge. Understanding identity and history inevitably requires a study of the seas, the communities it affects, and the secrets it was made to hold in the deep. For our very first episode of “Tomorrow is the Problem,” we explore the sea as a site that carries a collective memory of violence, an underwater collector of identities and meanings obscured by time and cultural erasure. Together with archaeologists Ayana Flewellen and Justin Dunnavant alongside Master Diver and Marine Biology Ph.D. student Kelsey Sapp, we probe the relationship between ...
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PublisherLateral Addition2019
Words sit on the page differently if they first existed as sound versus writing; they crystallize differently. I’ve been thinking about this a lot recently in relation to scores, feeling a little suspicious of writing things down, and wanting to take a step back to review what happens when sound is transduced into image. I’ve gotten interested in orality studies because the relationship of literacy and orality seems to have a lot in common with the relationship of notated music and aurally-composed music. In the 1930s, Milman Parry upended long-held assumptions about the past by demonstrating that the Homeric epics were ...

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