Index of Titles Filed Under 'Identity'

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PublisherThe Funambulist2018
This conversation was recorded with Hoda Katebi, the self-defined “sarcastic (& angry) Muslim-Iranian writer, photographer, and activist living in Chicago” behind the political fashion blog JooJoo Azad (“free bird” in Farsi) to be featured in The Funambulist 15 (Jan-Feb. 2018) Clothing Politics #2. In January 2017, a few days after the inauguration of the current U.S. President and the subsequent massive feminist protest, she wrote an article entitled “Please Keep Your American Flags Off My Hijab” about which we discuss in this interview, along with many other facets of her work with regards to clothing in relation to imperialism, capitalism ...
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PublisherTriple Canopy2021
“How do fictions give rise to nations and nationalities? How do they come to be understood as real and fundamental to identity?” An essay on fictional homelands, Potemkin nations, and wonders of the industrial world.
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PublisherSaraba2012
There is a statement, “Africa is a country,” used to satirize Western‘ preconceptions about Africa. With billions of people, thousands of ethnicities, several colonial histories and varied post-independence struggles, the continent is spoken of as a single plane that is beset by bad leadership, unending poverty, and the odd scenery. Yes, the continent has these, and yes, there really are some similarities across the different countries and cultures. But, the question remains: Is that all that can be said? And there is another question: How can you represent what truly is Africa? For us at Saraba, we set out to have ...
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PublisherThe Funambulist2021
If you’ve been listening to this podcast these past eight years, you know that we always do our interviews “in house,” as we value the moment of the recorded conversation as well as the encounter with someone’s work and personality. Rules are made to have exceptions however, and today we are happy to introduce you to a conversation between Amélie Tresfels and Michaëla Danjé around the book that Michaëla recently edited,  entitled AfroTrans. This book is the very first one published by Cases Rebelles‘ newly created publishing house. With this new endeavor, the panafrorevolutionary collective co-founded by Michaëla, continues to ...
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Publisheronestar press2004
What would it be like if one day everyone you encountered said that they were you. Would you let them assume your identification, knowing that ultimately they can only be themselves. These questions are what Carroll provokes us with in All the Men Who Think They Can Be Me.
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PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. Charlotte Salomon (1917–1943) is one of the nameless. During her brief lifetime, the only document that affirmed her status as artist was the typed transport list that took her from Drancy on October 7, 1943, to Auschwitz, where she was murdered on October 10 because she was a pregnant Jewish woman. Salomon had been incarcerated in 1940 in the French concentration camp at Gurs, along with a diverse group of women, many of whom managed to escape the camp in the turmoil following the capitulation of France to invading German forces in June 1940. Those ...
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Publisheronestar press2009
Keren Cytter’s absurdist novel tells the life story of “Media Star” Moshe Klinberg with language that suggests both a young woman’s diary entry and an American action movie script. Cytter’s intricate and evocative descriptions are accompanied by hilariously staged photographs, ostensibly taken from the personal archives of Moshe Klinberg.
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PublisherRhizome2012
American Cypher is a suite of projects that respond to American stories about race and DNA. The first module of this project was a sound installation commissioned by Bucknell University, inspired by Thomas Jefferson (the 3rd US president) and Sally Hemings (his slave and, as DNA tests confirm, mother to his children). The piece that we’ve made for the Download series is a performance score. The image in the video was recorded in the basement of Jefferson’s plantation, Monticello, in Charlottesville, Virginia.
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Artist and media critic Alessandro Ludovico interviews the three artists named Janez Janša. It’s no coincidence that they have the same name and not by chance that they share it with the former Slovenian Prime minister: they deliberately and officially changed the names they’d had from birth to Janez Janša. They also joined the right-wing SDS party led by their homonymous counterpart. After that they experienced a “visible disappearance” from having canceled their previous names but simultaneously having gained huge visibility thanks to their radical gesture. Changing your name is similar to dying: it affects more people other than just ...
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Publisheronestar press2006
Portraits getting drawn in the same way a piece of information circulates by word-of-mouth, through this imperfect medium the French call “Téléphone Arabe”: such is the proposal made by Kolkoz for their project. Progressively modifying the fundamental data given at the outset, the Arab Portraits are being developed in the artists’ circle; for them, each encounter thus gives the chance to try this game. Each participant only has to respect one rule: to reproduce the given “version” of the portrait as faithfully as possible. This way, each participant becomes one link of a chain where the successive portraits become ever more ...
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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation with Stéphanie Dadour evolves around her doctoral dissertation that studies architectural theory and practice in the end of 20th-century North America. We explore a particular chapter of this dissertation to continue a series started with Olivia Ahn and Karen Tongson, about the gendered spatial paradigm constituted by the American suburbia. Citing the works of Mary McLeod, Beatriz Colomina, Joel Sanders and other feminist/queer thinkers and architects, we address architectural elements proper to this paradigm, such as the lawn, the curtain, or the window as instances of gendered apparatuses. We conclude the conversation by examining anthropometric studies, as well ...
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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Liliana De Simone has for ambition to address the way architecture necessarily considers an idealized normalized body in order to conceive itself. Such a consideration almost always follows the dominant essentialization of bodies and this discussion addresses one in particular, gender. We first describe the canonical standardized bodies (often male) as defined by Le Corbusier, Neufert, and Dreyfuss. Then, we address more specifically the situation in South America (Colombia and Chile) and Liliana’s interest for urban policy making in this matter. We finish the conversation with the gender violence that resilience to catastrophes reasserts, in particular in the ...

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