Index of Titles Filed Under 'Infrastructure'

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This podcast, recorded with the three founders of Demilit (Bryan Finoki, Nick Sowers, and Javier Arbona) is a precedent for Archipelago since it constitutes both a walk to examine the hyper controlled policed space of downtown Oakland and a receptacle for the echoes of Occupy Oakland that comes as interludes to our discussion. We observe objects and spaces that are produced by securitarian logic that often attempt to dissimulate their function by an aesthetic of the ordinary. Starting from Oakland City Hall where Occupy used to have its encampment, we spend the first part of the conversation around the administrative/corporate center of ...
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PublisherStrelka Press2012
Space is a technology. Buildings and the cities they inhabit have become infrastructural – mobile, monetized networks. For the world’s power players, infrastructure space is a secret weapon, and the rest of us are only just beginning to realize. If Victor Hugo came back to give a TED talk, he might assert that architecture, which he once claimed had been killed by the book, is reincarnate as something more powerful still – as information itself. If this space is a secret weapon, says Keller Easterling, it is a secret best kept from those trained to make space – architects. Meanwhile, ...
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The complex architectures of the new “memory palaces”, from libraries, archives and museums to the IT structures, databases and server farms that feed the flow of data on the network. The transitional situation that we are experiencing, which brings together a book culture with a culture of the screen, is gradually shifting us from a graphic reason to a computational one. In the same way that writing has made it possible to generate a particular mode of thought, where lists, tables and formulas have played a primordial role in the modeling of knowledge. With digital technology, other systems of knowledge ...
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PublisherThe Funambulist2018
This conversation with Francesca Russello Ammon is built around her book, Bulldozer: Demolition and Clearance of the Postwar Landscape (2016), which retraces the political history of the bulldozer by the United States during World War II (used in the Pacific War by the SeaBees) and immediately following it in the massive engineering of the U.S. territory in cities and between them. This discussion can act as an addition to the contents featured in The Funambulist 17 (May-June 2018) “Weaponized Infrastructure.” Francesca Russello Ammon is a cultural historian of urban planning and the built environment. Her research focuses on the social, material, and cultural ...
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PublisherStrelka Press2021
In summer 2018, Amsterdam appointed eight-year-old Lotta Crok to the position of the first ever Junior Bicycle Mayor. According to her senior colleague Katelijne Boerma, they work in synergy and “it’s important that adult professionals help children to implement ideas that would be good for the city and the whole country.” What are the main goals set by the duo? In this episode, Katelijne outlines the story behind famous image of Amsterdam, dives into the most common threats to the development of bicycle lanes, and shares tips on moving towards a cycling society.
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PublisherChronos2019
Before the rise of the Web and our contemporary digital cultures, computer networks had already been imagined, tested, and used worldwide. This special issue retraces some of the technological, cultural and social paths that shaped the development of networks in six different areas of the world. The papers and the final conversation between two leading scholars of this issue touch some crucial topics of network histories from a variety of cultural, geographical and disciplinary perspectives. The issue combines studies and researches based on theoretical and empirical analyses in the U.S., Europe, Brazil and South Africa. Among the most relevant case studies, ...
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Consumption Junction is about the paradoxical intersection of environmentally sustainable activity and daily acts of consumption. The works of art gathered together for this exhibition and book share a conceptual language that addresses a range of topics from excessive spending, pollution, and urban infrastructure to alternative transportation, suburban sprawl, and recycling. They offer insightful cultural criticisms and whimsical, imaginative alternatives set somewhere between reality and fiction. In all cases they suggest the need for a worldwide environmental movement that responds to our ecologically precarious moment.
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PublisherCritical Design Lab2020
How are accessible spaces and designs maintained, and how can paying attention to maintenance challenge our ideas about design as always driven by innovation? In this episode of Contra*, I talk to Critical Design Lab member Leah Samples about her work on mapping the infrastructures of accessibility and designing protocols for the maintenance of technologies such as elevators.
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Publishere-flux2009
Projections of the future that were made in the past are often striking in their bold naïvete—didn’t people understand then that future projections always end up looking like caricatures of past concerns? But whereas these projections do little to actually activate the future they foresaw, they do function as expressions of pure intention, and in this sense they are probably not so naïve. Rather, they indicate a certain bold willingness on the part of people of a certain time to define in explicit terms exactly how the future should function, and indeed, most of these projected futures never come to pass—they remain ...
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Publishere-flux2015
Edited together with Nikolaus Hirsch, this first part of a special double issue of e-flux journal focusing on architecture invites a number of the field’s most audacious and adventurous thinkers to consider how these invisible and intangible forces are rebuilding cities and reformatting space over and above the role that architecture once served. They are not only reducible to data streams and technocratic information pathways, but also convert ethical questions of whose hands do the actual work of building into material expressions of labor markets, economic flows, and colonial memory. They include the passage from the formal domain of building ...
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Publishere-flux2015
More than ever, architects today are called upon to build gestural landmarks and grandiose signature buildings. But architecture was never only about building. It is also about the flows of people, information, and resources that shape space. Today, the practice of architecture often confronts situations where these flows cannot be reduced to modernist managerial approaches to systematizing, structuring, and mastering the potentials of space. In a two-part “Architecture as Intangible Infrastructure” issue of e-flux journal edited together with Nikolaus Hirsch, the intangible and immaterial flows that today appear to exceed the language of building proper are shown by a number of ...
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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Nick Caverly received me in Detroit a day after I arrived in the city whose population and economy has been drastically shrinking for the last decades and is now populated with a multitude of ruins and empty lots. We discuss the governance of the city that is now piloted by an “Emergency Finance Manager,” who reduced public service to a worrisome level, mostly detrimental to the most impoverished populations of the city. We also talk of the newcomers in the city, the white “creative class,” which, despite a commendable optimism tends to develop an imaginary that omit the existence of ...

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