Index of Titles Filed Under 'Language'

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PublisherTriple Canopy2017
The Amme Talks is a conversation between poet and machine. In 2003, poet Ulf Stolterfoht and a chatbot named Amme (which means “wet nurse” in German) met in Berlin. For one week, Stolterfoht interrogated Amme: not just a chatbot, actually, but a steel-and-glass construction with a computer interface, which is connected to a glass of milk, a robotic arm that tips over the glass, and a tube that releases water, as if urinating. Stolterfoht asked Amme—the creation of artist Peter Dittmer—about the nature of authorship and the agency of language; he intended to turn the answers into an essay on poetics. ...
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Publisheronestar press2016
For his participation in the 56th Venice Biennale, Rirkrit Tiravanija realized Untitled 2015 (14,086 unfired) an event located in the Central Exhibition, Arsenale, allowing visitors to purchase construction bricks stamped with a Mandarin translation of Guy Debord’s protest slogan “Ne Travaillez Jamais” with proceeds benefiting the Italian foundation ISCOS, a nonprofit supporting international worker’s rights in Italy and developing countries. Inspired by the ubiquitous presence of construction bricks piled before various building sites in Beijing, Tiravanija decided to “make a little factory” in China where this slogan was stamped into bricks by workers, emphasizing their labor as literal building block of ...
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Publishere-flux2019
There is a certain plasticity of meaning inherent in any use of language. If that weren’t the case, poetry and literature would not exist. There would only be contracts, scientific formulas, shopping lists, and so forth. Journalism would be properly factual—there would be no fake news or disinformation. All utterances would document isolated events, never evoking larger patterns or tapping into hidden desires. But then the question arises: Even if language could be cleansed of all ambiguity and spin, what role would images play? If language is the problem, images can only be worse. Against a backdrop where postmodern slippages in ...
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Publishere-flux2013
In April, Mark Epstein from the Cooper Union Board of Trustees announced the end of fully subsidized education across the college’s art, engineering, and architecture schools. It was a closing chapter in a ferocious battle in the college since it announced its insolvency in 2011. But it may be the beginning of something else… Editorial—‟Language and Internet” Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Anton Vidokle International Disco Latin Hito Steyerl English and All That Martha Rosler After the Social Media Hype: Dealing with Information Overload Geert Lovink The Whole Earth: In Conversation with Diedrich Diederichsen and Anselm Franke Ana Teixeira Pinto Towards a Post-Secular Aesthetics: Provocations for Possible Media in Afterlife ...
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Publishere-flux2014
Neoliberalism began as the idea that economic rationality could be applied as a model of governance in place of political ideology. No more authoritarianism. Just the rational calculation of people’s needs and wants. But now we realize that needs and wants are not rational. They are crazy. And they take place on such vastly different scales that, without any political idea to stabilize desires and render them accountable—even simply in the sense of being legible and comprehensible—we are faced with nothing but irrationality as a governing order. Even logistical mechanisms are only the infrastructural bracketing of a rational order that ...
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The inaugural issue of the Foreign Language Index (FLI) stems from discussions with art historians, curators, critics, artists, and students about the state of contemporary art history. Many lamented the increasing hegemony of anglophone scholarship, which can be traced to the rise of online content and the concentrated attention economy, along with the de- mise of both regional print publishing and foreign language acquisition. The dominance of English pervades the entirety of art history, but it is particularly pronounced in the contemporary field insofar as contemporary art is often meant to address a global audience, using English as a means ...
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PublisherUrbanomic2020
What’s it like to be a second-class citizen in the land of pop? In this essay, originally published in Audimat 4 (2015), Agnès Gayraud, author of Dialectic of Pop, who as francophone songwriter-performer La Féline has just released her third album Vie Future, asks why English remains the unchallenged native language of pop, and how a ‘minority’ language can possibly make its mark on pop as a musical art form.
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PublisherTriple Canopy2018
In “International Art English,” Alix Rule and David Levine describe the language of contemporary art by analyzing a corpus of press releases sent by e-flux, which is paid to do so by museums, biennials, publishers, and art fairs in order to reach a subscriber base of more than ninety thousand art professionals. The essay appeared in 2012 and soon surpassed the popularity of every other Triple Canopy publication. “International Art English” generated innumerable conversations about the relationship between language, legibility, and power in the art world: columns in the Guardian, polemics in e-flux’s online journal, debates at conferences for art ...
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
From its earliest use in the mandatory Jewish quarter of sixteenth century Venice to its association with Black segregated areas in postwar America, the term “ghetto” has held a variety of meanings and invoked myriad feelings. Daniel Schwartz traces the history of this controversial word.
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Publisheronestar press2010
A selection of 150 cities within Slavs and Tatars’ Eurasian remit, Love Me, Love Me Not: Changed Names plucks the petals off the past to reveal an impossibly thorny stem: a lineage of names changed by the course of the region’s grueling history. Some cities divulge a resolutely Asian heritage, so often forgotten in today’s quest, at all costs, for European integration. Some vacillate almost painfully, and others with numbing repetition, entire metropolises caught like children in the spiteful back and forth of a custody battle. Love Me, Love Me Not: Changed Names celebrates the multilingual, carnivalesque complexity readily eclipsed ...
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PublisherRabRab Press2014
Published in Tbilisi, in 2014, Sezgin Boynik’s Still Stealing Steel is historical-materialist study of avant-garde zaum language. The book actualises the most radical and subversive promises of Futurist zaum experiments made at the beginning of XX century in Russia and Georgia.
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PublisherFlugschriften2019
Translation is imitative yet transformative. It can and routinely does establish a semantic correspondence and a stylistic approximation to the source text. But these relations can never give back that text intact… Change is unavoidable.

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