Index of Titles Filed Under 'Language'

Publisheronestar press2016
For his participation in the 56th Venice Biennale, Rirkrit Tiravanija realized Untitled 2015 (14,086 unfired) an event located in the Central Exhibition, Arsenale, allowing visitors to purchase construction bricks stamped with a Mandarin translation of Guy Debord’s protest slogan “Ne Travaillez Jamais” with proceeds benefiting the Italian foundation ISCOS, a nonprofit supporting international worker’s rights in Italy and developing countries. Inspired by the ubiquitous presence of construction bricks piled before various building sites in Beijing, Tiravanija decided to “make a little factory” in China where this slogan was stamped into bricks by workers, emphasizing their labor as literal building block of ...
Publishere-flux2019
There is a certain plasticity of meaning inherent in any use of language. If that weren’t the case, poetry and literature would not exist. There would only be contracts, scientific formulas, shopping lists, and so forth. Journalism would be properly factual—there would be no fake news or disinformation. All utterances would document isolated events, never evoking larger patterns or tapping into hidden desires. But then the question arises: Even if language could be cleansed of all ambiguity and spin, what role would images play? If language is the problem, images can only be worse. Against a backdrop where postmodern slippages in ...
PublisherTriple Canopy2018
In “International Art English,” Alix Rule and David Levine describe the language of contemporary art by analyzing a corpus of press releases sent by e-flux, which is paid to do so by museums, biennials, publishers, and art fairs in order to reach a subscriber base of more than ninety thousand art professionals. The essay appeared in 2012 and soon surpassed the popularity of every other Triple Canopy publication. “International Art English” generated innumerable conversations about the relationship between language, legibility, and power in the art world: columns in the Guardian, polemics in e-flux’s online journal, debates at conferences for art ...
PublisherThinkbelt2020
From its earliest use in the mandatory Jewish quarter of sixteenth century Venice to its association with Black segregated areas in postwar America, the term “ghetto” has held a variety of meanings and invoked myriad feelings. Daniel Schwartz traces the history of this controversial word.
Publisheronestar press2010
A selection of 150 cities within Slavs and Tatars’ Eurasian remit, Love Me, Love Me Not: Changed Names plucks the petals off the past to reveal an impossibly thorny stem: a lineage of names changed by the course of the region’s grueling history. Some cities divulge a resolutely Asian heritage, so often forgotten in today’s quest, at all costs, for European integration. Some vacillate almost painfully, and others with numbing repetition, entire metropolises caught like children in the spiteful back and forth of a custody battle. Love Me, Love Me Not: Changed Names celebrates the multilingual, carnivalesque complexity readily eclipsed ...
PublisherTriple Canopy2017
The Amme Talks is a conversation between poet and machine. In 2003, poet Ulf Stolterfoht and a chatbot named Amme (which means “wet nurse” in German) met in Berlin. For one week, Stolterfoht interrogated Amme: not just a chatbot, actually, but a steel-and-glass construction with a computer interface, which is connected to a glass of milk, a robotic arm that tips over the glass, and a tube that releases water, as if urinating. Stolterfoht asked Amme—the creation of artist Peter Dittmer—about the nature of authorship and the agency of language; he intended to turn the answers into an essay on poetics. ...
PublisherFlugschriften2019
Translation is imitative yet transformative. It can and routinely does establish a semantic correspondence and a stylistic approximation to the source text. But these relations can never give back that text intact… Change is unavoidable.
PublisherUrbanomic2020
What’s it like to be a second-class citizen in the land of pop? In this essay, originally published in Audimat 4 (2015), Agnès Gayraud, author of Dialectic of Pop, who as francophone songwriter-performer La Féline has just released her third album Vie Future, asks why English remains the unchallenged native language of pop, and how a ‘minority’ language can possibly make its mark on pop as a musical art form.
How does language change our understanding of the natural world, and our own role within it? How can the introduction of new terms into public discourse – depense, degrowth – alter our realities? Visual Ecolophonic is an informal research project by INDA & Animali Domestici through encounters with with Sami reindeer herders, cultural associations, and artists, in northern Finland, which considers how the Northern Sami language embraces the ecosophic, or ecophilosophical, complexity of nature in a way that other languages do not. The project considers how architects may embrace a more complex vocabulary and understanding of the ecologies in which ...
PublisherGauss PDF2019
In the olden days while we were fighting the Language poets, I decided I would be the ideologue and pit-bull against Ron Silli- man. I called his writing “wallpaper.” I did apologize a few years ago, and he said something a bit nasty in return because I didn’t expand upon it. But since then, I’ve been doing all this other stuff built around mess at all levels. It also goes along with the lin- guistic streamlining or minimalizing of American language that’s going on very noticeably now, especially if you have the ears to compare it with the slowness of ...
A name always bears a symbolic mandate. As soon as false pretenders appear, questions arise as to the symbolic mandate’s power, its validity and justification. Names refer to genealogies, yet thereby always involve a certain distribution of power. To arrogate a name is to arrogate power. There is a claim to power in every name, in assuming the social role that goes with it, in transmitting symbolic legacy, in social impact, in genealogical inscription. The story of false pretenders entails the moment of bemusement – one’s feeling that, really, one is always a false pretender, as there’s no way one ...

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