Index of Titles Filed Under 'Literature'

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PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. Dune was to be his most ambitious film production: a personal adaptation of Frank Herbert’s novel of the same title, published in 1965. The science-fiction saga was ideally suited to the choreography of transgressive visual and narra- tive genres of the sort in which the method of Alejandro Jodorowsky (b. 1929 in Chile) partakes, and as it had been manifested in his films El Topo (1970) and The Holy Mountain (1973). Such an important project merited its own blank book. Hence, the word “DUNE” written in Art Deco-style typography is on the cover of a ...
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PublisherTriple Canopy2017
The Amme Talks is a conversation between poet and machine. In 2003, poet Ulf Stolterfoht and a chatbot named Amme (which means “wet nurse” in German) met in Berlin. For one week, Stolterfoht interrogated Amme: not just a chatbot, actually, but a steel-and-glass construction with a computer interface, which is connected to a glass of milk, a robotic arm that tips over the glass, and a tube that releases water, as if urinating. Stolterfoht asked Amme—the creation of artist Peter Dittmer—about the nature of authorship and the agency of language; he intended to turn the answers into an essay on poetics. ...
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PublisherUrbanomic2018
Drawing on his book Alternate Histories and Nineteenth-Century Literature, Ben Carver examines the figures and functions of evolution, isolation, and entanglement in the imaginary Utopias and Uchronias of speculative fiction, and plots some unsuspected paths between early counterfactual histories and the dark underworlds of contemporary conspiracy theory
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The year is 2250. The colony on the Moon is divided into debaucherous fascists and an underclass of mutants born without genitals. Follow Frank and Gerry, two mutant bros. By day, they’re forced to salvage through the remains of a porn-filled shuttle that crashed on the Moon’s dark side. By night, they plot their revenge.
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Episode 21: Breaking the Waves (Disputaziuns Susch, The Magicians of the Mountains) The third episode in the series of chapters from Disputaziuns Susch, an annual conference scheme hosted by Art Stations Foundation CH and Grazyna Kulczyk, has Elisabeth Bronfen looking at Virginia Woolfe’s ‘Breaking the Waves’ and comparing Woolfe’s feeling of ‘walking a tightrope over nothingness’ to Heidegger’s notion of individual existences as ‘being thrown’ into the world. Also the horizon (see episode two) is returning to the debate. Disputaziuns Susch, from the beginning in 2017, has been a multi-disciplinary annual endeavor, bringing together scholars and artists, philosophers and authors, neuroscientists and ...
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PublisherFiktion2015
In this anthology, edited by Fiktion’s cofounder Ingo Niermann, nineteen writers and researchers address a fiercely contested commodity in digital society: concentration. Ingeborg Harms, Quinn Latimer, Arthur Jacobs, and Raoul Schrott write about the circumstances under which a text or activity can completely draw us into its spell, Dirk Baecker and Amy Patton about a shifting concentration, Jenna Sutela and Elvia Wilk about one that carries us into the spherical, Charis Conn about concentration violently induced; Nina Bußmann writes about the uncertainty as to whether she is currently concentrating or distracting herself; Sophie Jung, Emily Segal, and Alexander Tarakhovsky make ...
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PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. There once was a trader, a white man at the store back on the Rez, who was so good at tricking Indians they were a little bit proud of him. One day an Indian came up to the counter and said to the trader, “Now you are the cheatin’ wonder of the whole civilized world, but that one over there, he’s even better than you are.” “Why him? He’s only a scrawny critter!” “Yep, that’s the one. So why don’t you let him prove it?” So the white man ambled over to Coyote and said, “Let’s you and me ...
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Fiktion has been set up by German- and English-language writers as a model for using the opportunities afforded by the digital to raise the profile of challenging literature and improve its means of distribution. The project operates on several levels, including the digital publication of German- and English-language literature that does not fit the current criteria of the market. Fiktion experimentally rejects the economic necessities of the publishing business; all titles are distributed free of charge.
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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
We begin this podcast with Bhakti Shringarpure introducing the online journal Warscapes that she founded. The discussion that follows emerges from an original unsuspected dialogue between two articles Bhakti and I wrote in Summer 2012, when Ansar Dine destroyed several Sufi mausoleums and precious manuscripts in Timbuktu. Bhakti had then put back into political and historical context and compared such “rage against the monuments” (see below) with the writings of Georges Bataille about the take of the Bastille, considered as the beginning of the 1789 French revolution. In my own article, I had attempted to show how both iconoclasts and iconodules are considered as such ...
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PublisherMikrotext2016
The number of representatives of digital publishing that Berlin has attracted in recent years is astonishing. Their lingua franca is a code that can be understood anywhere you go and is used across the world: the e-book code. As part of the Stadtsprachen Festival, taking place in Berlin in November 2016 and funded by the Hauptstadtkulturfonds, this reader look at what it is that constitutes this international digital voice. Four Berlin-based publisher-authors (Kathrin Passig of Techniktagebuch, Nikola Richter of mikrotext, Ansgar Warner of ebooknews, and Gregor Weichbrodt of 0x0a/Frohmann) share and discuss opinions, experiences, and challenges. In addition, four important ...
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PublisherFall Semester2016
I make copies on the English Department xerox machine and pass them out to my students. “Civil Disobedience” by Thoreau, “Self-Reliance” by Emerson. Of course, the students can nd the same texts on the internet, but I prefer not to allow cellphones in class. I prefer not to. I can see you texting in the back of the room, under your desk, while pretending to pay attention, and sometimes, even though it says “cellphones are forbidden during class” on the syllabus, you take out your phone, right in front of me, in broad daylight, so to speak, and check your messages. ...

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