Index of Titles Filed Under 'Memes'

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PublisherStrelka Press2013
These are serious times, or so our governments keep telling us. Strangling economies with their austerity policies, they assure us that they have no choice. In a world where “there is no alternative”, how do you dissent? Once upon a time, graphic designers would have made political posters and typeset manifestos. Today, protest has new strategies. Enter the internet meme. With its Darwinian survival skills and its viral potential, the meme is a way of scaling up protest. Hackers and activists have learned to unleash the destructive force of a Rick Astley video. They have let slip the Lolcats of ...
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PublisherNew Models2020
Dubbed the “busiest man on the internet,” polymath TIM HWANG, currently a research fellow at the Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET) at Georgetown University, visits the NM pod to discuss his new book, Subprime Attention Crisis: Advertising and the Time Bomb at the Heart of the Internet (FSG, 2020). We also talk GPT-3, predictive policing, DIY platforms, and founding the first-ever conference on memes.
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Publishere-flux2017
Every December, dictionaries and language societies across the globe identify the “words of the year”—words that resonated widely during the previous twelve months. In the mid-2000s, these lists were populated with words like “contempt” and “quagmire,” “ambivalence” and “conundrum.” A few years later, dominant words included “trepidation” and “precipice” and “fail,” “vitriol” and “insidious” and “bigot.” The OED’s word of the year for 2012 was “omnishambles.” 2016, however, was for OED the year of “post-truth.” Merriam-Webster selected the word “surreal.” In the wake of Brexit and the US elections, Russia’s annexation of the Crimea and Turkey’s disregard for journalistic freedom, ...
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PublisherNew Models2020
Writer, consultant, and Ribbon Farm founder VENKATESH RAO speaks with New Models about memetics & institutions, virality & democracy, Log Level thinking, BIOS Level politics, and how to navigate reality in a time when we’re all NPCs in a world going “brrrrrrrrr.” ⛓️This conversation was recorded April 7th, 2020.
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PublisherNew Models2021
This episode is being jointly released by JOSHUA CITARELLA & NEW MODELS following a period of research on the status of cultural institutions and the future of post-Web2 creator communities. A New York based artist, Josh also has a podcast, a Twitch stream, and a Discord community (Josh’s Super Secret Sleeper Cell). He’s been a guest on the New Models podcast twice and joined us last year for a public lecture on Gen-Z’s political identity formation online. We’re sharing this conversation to let you see behind the scenes of how we are thinking about our respective platforms — and the ecosystem ...
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PublisherLink Editions2011
Peer Pressure is a collection of essays previously published online between 2010 and 2011. In the author’s words, “each essay is an impassioned description or prescription to understand the digital space we inhabit differently.” Most of these writings have been highly influential for the (relatively) small community the author addresses, eliciting many heated debates. The texts idealistically address creative platforms, image aggregators, relational practices, internet memes and much more.
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PublisherJoshua Citarella2018
What begins as a casual engagement with funny memes can rapidly metastasize. The most common path for this particular group seems to arrive at something called Cyber-nihilism, a blend of Landian techno-pessimism, Primitivist anxiety and Transhumanist detachment. Enough time spent in this space culminates in a type of ideological Stockholm syndrome. Many of these ideas already exist on a continuum tilted towards nihilism; joining a doom cult is not too far a leap.
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PublisherMeson Press2021
With anchors in feminist theory, queer discourse, and digital politics, Really Fake rescues “fakeness” from the morass of “fake news” and rejuvenates “fake” as a material and tactical reality. This book treats fakeness as a media object itself: “Fakes” are things that travel and circulate through our bodies, sociality, and the technologies that envelop them. Punctuated with anecdotes, experiences, poetry, stories, and a strong feminist ethic and ethos of care, intimacy, and collectivity, Really Fake offers a series of entry points into reframing the debates of fakeness beyond polarized positions of performative outrage.
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PublisherNew Models2020
We speak with ARTHUR JONES and GIORGIO ANGELINI, filmmakers of “FEELS GOOD MAN,” which tells the story of comic artist Matt Furie and the wild journey of his character Pepe the Frog. Yet this set up is also a lens for telling an even broader and deeper story of the past two decades: one that spans intergenerational communication, magic and media, anti-authoritarian rebellion, and the volatility of signs. The documentary comes out August 28 to select audiences (and Sept. 4 everywhere). We nominate it Political Film of the Year.
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PublisherNew Models2019
Feat. artist and social theorist JOSHUA CITARELLA who has been exploring how deep online spaces have evolved over the past few years, shaping popular politics in turn — especially among younger people. Last fall when we spoke to Joshua (ep. 6), he had just published a long-form piece on Politigram and the Post-Left. In this ep, we talk to him about his most recent essay, “Irony Politics & Gen Z” (published on New Models this spring), discussing the funnel of online radicalization and what tactics the left needs to consider for more effective off-ramping.
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PublisherNew Models2018
Teenagers rule memetic warfare, producing some of its most viral and also radical content. In this ep. New Models speaks with artist JOSHUA CITARELLA (prev. of thejogging.tumblr) who, after lurking the more radical political spaces of social media from 2012-18, is out with a new (soon to be) book, “Politigram & the Post-Left.”
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PublisherOnCurating.org2016
“Work, Migration, Memes, Personal Geopolitics” is being published within the framework of the Parallel Events accompanying Zurich’s Manifesta 11 devoted to the theme “What People Do for Money: Some Joint Ventures.” Unlike the Manifesta concept, the contributions to this journal relate the changes that have come about in working conditions and circumstances since the early 1990s directly to the multifarious migration movements in Europe. To this day, changes in working processes and migration movements are usually regarded as mutually isolated “problems.” However, we see the connection between them as a geopolitical reality rooted in political and economic power structures, aspirations to ...

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