Index of Titles Filed Under 'Political Theory'

PublisherOUP Oxford2005
Neoliberalism—the doctrine that market exchange is an ethic in itself, capable of acting as a guide for all human action—has become dominant in both thought and practice throughout much of the world since 1970 or so. Its spread has depended upon a reconstitution of state powers such that privatization, finance, and market processes are emphasized. State interventions in the economy are minimized, while the obligations of the state to provide for the welfare of its citizens are diminished. David Harvey, author of ‘The New Imperialism’ and ‘The Condition of Postmodernity’, here tells the political-economic story of where neoliberalization came from ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2017
This conversation was recorded with Hoda Katebi, the self-defined “sarcastic (& angry) Muslim-Iranian writer, photographer, and activist living in Chicago” behind the political fashion blog JooJoo Azad (“free bird” in Farsi) to be featured in The Funambulist 15 (Jan-Feb. 2018) Clothing Politics #2. In January 2017, a few days after the inauguration of the current U.S. President and the subsequent massive feminist protest, she wrote an article entitled “Please Keep Your American Flags Off My Hijab” about which we discuss in this interview, along with many other facets of her work with regards to clothing in relation to imperialism, capitalism ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation with Caren Kaplan introduces the work she has been conducting for her forthcoming book dedicated to a genealogy of aerial photography (and painting) and its militarization leading to the ‘age of the drone’ we currently experience. We begin with the development of the balloon, the progressive learning necessary to understand this new point of view on the world and the simultaneous success of panorama paintings. We then evoke the creation of the British Board of Ordinance and its survey of Scotland as part of the counter-insurrectionist effort to control the terrain against the Jacobites. We conclude the discussion in ...

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Publisher2014
There has been many things written about the urban transformations of Paris orchestrated by Napoleon III’s prefect, the “Baron” Haussmann; many of which address the militarized causes of these transformations, as I often did myself. This aspect of the transformations is admitted by Haussmann himself in his memoirs as part of the strategy. The first part of the 19th-century saw many insurrections and revolutions happening in Paris (1830 revolution, 1832 insurrection, 1848 revolution, etc.) and Napoleon III, after his 1851 coup, was certainly eager to transform Paris to be able to control it. The large avenues and boulevards were thus ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation with Hana Sleiman begins a series of several around the Palestinian question(s). After evoking her archiving work of historical Arabic comic books and their construction of a political imaginary, Hana and I talk about this important construction of a Palestinian Oral History Archive at the American University of Beirut. This archive comprises about a thousand hours of interview with Palestinian having experienced the 1948 Nakba and its evictive violence. We particularly insist on the embraced subjectivities of such narratives, stressing that what is remembered and how it is remembered is more important than the illusory ambition of an ...

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PublisherMute2013
Felix Stalder’s extended essay, Digital Solidarity, responds to the wave of new forms of networked organisation emerging from and colliding with the global economic crisis of 2008. Across the globe, voluntary association, participatory decision-making and the sharing of resources, all widely adopted online, are being translated into new forms of social space. This movement operates in the breach between accelerating technical innovation, on the one hand, and the crises of institutions which organise, or increasingly restrain society on the other. Through an inventory of social forms – commons, assemblies, swarms and weak networks – the essay outlines how far we ...

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Publishere-flux2016
In Poland, the Law and Order Party has fired a curator for promoting Jewish themes. A Catholic Nationalist is chief adviser to American president-elect Donald Trump. Hungary’s right-wing government threatens the Lukács archive with destruction. Modi’s BJP arrests a college student president for insulting “Mother India.” Theresa May replaces paintings in 10 Downing Street with framed pictures of her own quotes. The curtain rises on the second century since the Russian Revolution to reveal a lifeworld beset with problems shocking in their undead familiarity. It is true that the future is unknown and invisible, but not everything invisible and unknown contains ...

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Publishere-flux2018
In ten seconds, how many synonyms can you think of for the word “power”? And then, just when you thought that you finally got the hang of how the power structures around you function, they seem to be coming undone. But are they really coming undone, or is the current that’s pushing and pulling at them not much more than a massage, a way to keep them up to date that stays only on the surface and is not able to touch the center. What is feminism, precisely? What are feminisms today? To answer these questions and myriad others, the next two issues ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2013
Nothing of what we wear is politically innocent. Our clothing constitutes the skin of our public body, what Mimi Thi Nguyen calls its “epidermalization.” This public body is read through a set of norms and expectations that crystallize society’s ostracism. Mimi and I talked about normative processes that unfold themselves through clothing (the hoody, the veil, the sweatpants), as well as neo-colonial politics implemented in the various American military operations in countries like Vietnam and Afghanistan. Mimi Thi Nguyen is Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies, and Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of The ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2016
This conversation was exceptionally recorded online so to be featured in the fourth issue of The Funambulist Magazine, Carceral Environments (Mar-Apr 2016), but was somehow reenacted at the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal on March 6, 2016. Through it, Nasrin Himada gives us an introduction to prison abolitionism, not as a ready-made system that can replace the current carceral industrial complex but, rather, as a daily practice that starts with notions of the notions of individual, community, and accountability. Nasrin Himada is a writer, editor, and curator residing in Montréal. Her interdisciplinary research interests focus on the history of Palestinian cinema, art and ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This second November conversation in London about disobedience takes a conceptual approach to this legal notion with Elena Loizidou. Through her personal research, as well as the work she curated around this notion in a 2010 symposium and a 2013 book, we attempt to consider disobedience for the political subjectivity it involves vis-a-vis the law. We do so not solely through the canonical figure of the civil objection (Rosa Parks), but also through more complex examples involving notions of selfishness, privacy and apolitics in the work of Hannah Arendt, William Burroughs, Emma Goldman and Walter Benjamin. We also look at how ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Naomi Paik exposes the arguments she develops in her forthcoming book currently entitled Rightlessness (2015). In it, she uses three historical examples of camps administrated by the United States in their efforts of manufacturing rightlessness for bodies it wants to exclude from traditional judicial channels. We begin the conversation by talking of the logic behind the late 1980s discussion about symbolical and financial reparations to Japanese American citizens who had been incarcerated in the infamous camps from 1942 to 1945. Naomi then describes the legal and physical existence of a camp in Guantanamo holding HIV positive refugees having fled the ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
In this short conversation, Ethel Baraona Pohl and I discuss about the ever growing militarization of the polices of the world based on a lecture she gave the same day in Rotterdam for a seminar organized by Malkit Shoshan. We particularly insist on the American police example, which has manifested it clears belligerency against the African American population in the recent months in Ferguson, MO.  We attempt to understand what are the founding logics of such a militarization, both at a philosophical, economic and legal level. We conclude the conversation by conversing about the picture of Ukrainian protesters aiming mirrors at ...

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PublisherBadlands Unlimited2012
In 2003, after returning from a month-long stay in Baghdad, American artist Paul Chan was given a gift from a colleague in the human-rights group Voices of the Wilderness: a copy of three speeches on democracy written by Saddam Hussein in the 1970s, before he became president of Iraq. The speeches, compiled here for the first time in English, are politically perverse, yet eerily familiar. The then vice president of Iraq characterizes social democracy as demanding authority, and defines free will as the patriotic duty to uphold the good of the state. This volume takes the speeches as an opportunity ...

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PublisherMute2014
Rejecting the dichotomy of centralism and horizontalism that has deeply marked millennial politics, Rodrigo Nunes’ close analysis of network systems demonstrates how organising within contemporary social and political movements exists somewhere between – or beyond – the two. Rather than the party or chaos, the one or the multitude, he discovers a ‘bestiary’ of hybrid organisational forms and practices that render such disjunctives false. The resulting picture shows how social and technical networks can and do facilitate strategic action and fluid distributions of power at the same time. It is by developing the strategic potentials that are already immanent to ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2015
This conversation is the third one about the formation of a public body through clothing. Although this discussion was not intended to mostly focus on head garments, most of it can be gathered under this…cap. Through the two examples of the creation of the Gandhi cap during the Indian movement for the independence, and the hijab, we explore the two books written by Emma Tarlo, Clothing Matters (1996) and Visibly Muslim (2010). We particularly insist on the political semiology of these garments, which dooms any definite interpretation to fail, but recognizes their capacity to construct a collective identity and the potential for solidarity that this implies. Emma ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Liduam Pong is primarily based on the essay she wrote for the first volume of the Funambulist Papers (Punctum Books, 2013). She was describing in it her experience growing up in Cuba where some books were considered as subversive and thus forbidden. This interdiction was followed by the creation of informal clandestine libraries for people to access these books. We therefore speak about the political power a book contains within a simple object, and attempt to understand this power through indirect political means, through the reading of Jorge Luis Borges’s literature and his quest of the infinite. Liduam ...

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PublisherRabRab Press2014
The first issue of Rab-Rab: Journal for Political and Formal Inquiries in Art, published in November 2014, deals with the question of language. The texts written by artists and scholars covere the topics such as the symbols of fascism, the theory of slogans, the rhetoric of punk, ideologies of artistic research, etc. Among the contributors to the first issue are John Roberts, Alexei Yurchak, Susan Kelly, Kalle Lampela, Michel Chevalier, Minna Henriksson, and others.

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PublisherRabRab Press2015
The second issue of Rab-Rab is in two volumes, all together in 500 pages. The focus of the second issue is ‘noise against culture.’ The contributions deal with the formal theory of noise, politics of contradictions, the device of estrangement, materialist film, music and violence, Futurism, Russian avant-garde, improvisation, void, heterophonies, swearwords, communism, ideologies of marriage, class wars and electricity. Departing from our programme based on the understanding of art practice as a confrontation between formal and political inquiries, our aim in this issue is to use noise as the name for this difficult, disturbing, loud and coercive exploration. In many ...

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PublisherShifter2008
While stranded in Dublin, Ohio on September 13th 2001 due to the grounding of all domestic flights in the US, the editors visited the local library. umbing through the card catalogue, they found a reference to “Other Possibilities,” by Indira Sylvia (I.S.) Belissop assigned the Dewey Decimal call number 125.20. Let alone the book, even this curious number inserted between “Teleology” (124) and “ e Self” (126) has since been impossible to find in major libraries around the world. e book itself did not appear on the shelf, and the card, in classic Courier font, stated simply, “Collected writings of ...

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PublisherShifter2012
Shifter 19 : Proposals will be published in two volumes. The first is this newsprint publication launched in September 2012 at the New York Art Book Fair and the second, a reader, will be released in the summer of 2013. In this first volume of Shifter 19 we have invited a small group of artist-educators to each contribute a “proposal.” The proposals loosely gathered here will build a framework for a more detailed deliberation on art and education in the second volume of this issue. Shifter’s 18th issue considered the temporality of intention as a prior condition for action—an impetus that is ...

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PublisherAndperseand2012
My view now is – everything is shit! Hopeless! The skein is too tangled to be unravelled. It can only be sheared. The edifice is too solid to be pulled down; it must be blown up. And it shall be! – August Strindberg, Letter to Jonas Lie, Christmas Eve, 1884 August Strindberg self-identified as ‘the son of a servant’ and his sense of enmity with the Swedish overclass is palpable throughout his oeuvre. Small Catechism for the Underclass exhibits his sense of himself as a ‘one-man fire brigade’. Not beholden to any particular group, movement or sect, Strindberg practiced an extreme form ...

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PublisherSemiotext(e)2015
The Coming Insurrection is an extraordinary text written anonymously by An Imaginary Collective. After its publication in December 2008, nine anarchist comrades from Tarnac, France were accused of being the authors of this text and were charged with criminal association for the purposes of terrorist activity, which subsequently led to their arrest and imprisonment. (The group is known as the Tarnac 9)

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PublisherDiaphanes2015
At its most basic, philosophy is about learning how to think about the world around us. It should come as no surprise, then, that children make excellent philosophers! Naturally inquisitive, pint-size scholars need little prompting before being willing to consider life’s “big questions,” however strange or impractical. Plato & Co. introduces children—and curious grown-ups—to the lives and work of famous philosophers, from Descartes to Socrates, Einstein, Marx, and Wittgenstein. Each book in the series features an engaging—and often funny—story that presents basic tenets of philosophical thought alongside vibrant color illustrations. In The Ghost of Karl Marx, the philosopher is saddened ...

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PublisherThe Funambulist2017
This conversation with Wendy Matsumura is released along a short report about current movements of protest against the US army’s ubiquitous presence in Okinawa, published in The Funambulist blog. Wendy takes us through the chronology of domination that Ryukyuans (cf. lexicon in the report), then Okinawans had to experience since the 17th century and the various forms of resistance that were opposed to it. From the Satsuma Clan’s claim on the Ryukyu Kingdom, to the Japanese annexation of it, to the US army’s occupation, and finally the current situation of a US imperialism negotiated with the successive Japanese governments and their varying ...

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