Index of Titles Filed Under 'Public Space'

PublisherThe Funambulist2017
This conversation with Myriam Dao, Nathalie Muchamad, Miki Nitadori & Ayomih intends to examine the specificity of anti-Asian in France. Although it was recorded in January 2017, it resonates with a particularly urgent echo today as, a few day ago, the French police killed Liu Shaoyo, a 56-year-old Chinese Parisian, in his own apartment, in front of his four (French) children. Far from the ‘simple’ observations of biased prejudices that characterize many conversations about racism deployed against Asian bodies, this conversation examines how this racism in France finds its roots deep into colonialism, in French “Indochina” (Viet Nam, Cambodia and Laos) of ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This podcast, recorded with the three founders of Demilit (Bryan Finoki, Nick Sowers, and Javier Arbona) is a precedent for Archipelago since it constitutes both a walk to examine the hyper controlled policed space of downtown Oakland and a receptacle for the echoes of Occupy Oakland that comes as interludes to our discussion. We observe objects and spaces that are produced by securitarian logic that often attempt to dissimulate their function by an aesthetic of the ordinary. Starting from Oakland City Hall where Occupy used to have its encampment, we spend the first part of the conversation around the administrative/corporate center of ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2014
For Nikolaos Patsopoulos, the current situation in Europe is similar to the one in Russia right before the revolution and so should be the architecture that accompanies these shift of social paradigms. We discuss about the role of the architect in revolutionary movements, as (s)he has probably more to unlearn than to teach in this matter. For Nikolaos however, each body that modifies the way the built environment (in particular the street) operates politically can be called architect. We therefore spend the time to contrast these two figures sharing the same name of architect, one that contributes actively to the production of ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2013
Daniel and I had this conversation the day after the 2013 Goldsmiths Graduate Conference, where we were both participating in a panel suitably entitled “The Sea, Shores, Islands – Territory, Sovereignty and the State.” His paper “The Construction of the End,” given that day is the starting point of our discussion, in which we discuss the legal debates about the location of the shore line in Spain, the national claims of sovereignty of a given territory based on scientific and technological criteria, as well as the various circumventions of the law that provide a form of cabinet of architectural curiosities of which ...

Read More

PublisherDroste Effect2017
This is the last chapter of a project that goes under the name of Practices as an Intersection in a Fragile Environment, an independent research investigating the relationship between Art and the Public Sphere in a state of cultural nomadism. The title São Paulo Out Of Reach originates from a 2012 exhibition by Brazilian artist Mauro Restiffe at Instituto Moureira Salles in Rio de Janeiro; a statement that points out very clearly the impossibility of reaching, defining and understanding the city in just one gaze. This chapter is dedicated to the city of São Paulo and mainly focuses on its Architecture and Urbanism ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Michelle Murphy is divided into two parts: BIOPOLITICAL FEMINISM: The first part introduces Foucault’s concept of biopolitics and applies it to forms of economization of life particularly in relation to female bodies. Paraphrasing Foucault, Michelle affirms that governmental capitalism needs for “some must not to be born so that future others will live more consumptibly, productively in the logic of macro-economy .” She thus unfolds the political history of regulation and ‘marketing’ of reproduction and contraception that organizes such an economization of life at a scale of a population. Further, we discuss of Michelle’s concept, “The Girl” as the problematic current vessel of ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2013
Lucy and I start this conversation around the legal strategies at work in contemporary India. Between the eminent domain, legal reminiscence of the colonial era used by state-backed developers, and the immanent domain that informal settlements constitute for their own survival in the city, we discuss about how law and its spatial practices can be used as political strategies. We also evoke William Burroughs’s fictitious territory of the Interzone as the place of suspension of the law, the thickness of the diagrammatic line designed by legal architects, a liminal space where one can deliberately inhabit, but where others are forced into. Lucy completed ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2013
Nothing of what we wear is politically innocent. Our clothing constitutes the skin of our public body, what Mimi Thi Nguyen calls its “epidermalization.” This public body is read through a set of norms and expectations that crystallize society’s ostracism. Mimi and I talked about normative processes that unfold themselves through clothing (the hoody, the veil, the sweatpants), as well as neo-colonial politics implemented in the various American military operations in countries like Vietnam and Afghanistan. Mimi Thi Nguyen is Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies, and Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of The ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2014
We begin this podcast with Bhakti Shringarpure introducing the online journal Warscapes that she founded. The discussion that follows emerges from an original unsuspected dialogue between two articles Bhakti and I wrote in Summer 2012, when Ansar Dine destroyed several Sufi mausoleums and precious manuscripts in Timbuktu. Bhakti had then put back into political and historical context and compared such “rage against the monuments” (see below) with the writings of Georges Bataille about the take of the Bastille, considered as the beginning of the 1789 French revolution. In my own article, I had attempted to show how both iconoclasts and iconodules are considered as such ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2014
In this conversation, Sophia Seawell and I examine how violence unfolds on bodies through the conformity to the normative category that has been attributed to them. We look at this problem particularly in terms of gender, continuously perpetuated by bodily performativities that often manifests themselves spatially. In this regard, opening the door of a gendered bathroom and its semiotics constitutes for many of us as a deliberate acceptation of the gendered that has been attributed to us. Sophia’s research is particularly oriented toward bodies that have undertook to transgress performativity by adopting the one of the “opposite gender” to their normative attribution. ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Fiona I.B. Ngô focuses on her book, Imperial Blues (2014) that develops a discourse around the simultaneous suppressive and productive aspects of race and sex through a travel in the various geo(chrono)graphies of New York in the 1920s. We talk of the various signs (bodies, objects, spaces) created and worn to reference the imperial vision of that that it is not. We also converse about the movement of bodies, at a transnational level, as much as at the level of the body dancing (“the cops are here, let’s play a waltz!”) without forgetting the movement between various neighborhoods of New ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2013
The law is an apparatus of power that inscribes itself on the bodies. Legal theorist Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos responds to questions, hypotheses and intuitions I have as an architect about the relationship between law, space and bodies. Beyond my own understanding of the law as the diagrammatization of the relationships of power that architecture undertakes to embody through its materiality, Andreas prefer to think of the law as a whole, even including paradoxically the outlaw within its system. In this understanding, we look together at the law’s axioms, its requisites and its signs. Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos is the director of the Westminster Law ...

Read More

Making Room: Cultural Production in Occupied Spaces is an anthology of texts on art, media and aesthetic practice in the context of squatting, occupation and urban space activism. It includes pieces by activist researchers working between the academy and the movements they write about, as well as journalistic first-person narratives by squatters, original photography, and interviews with artists, theorists and activists involved in struggles over urban space and creative production in the city. Focused primarily on the European context, its international relations and connection, this diverse collection of material is organized into sections by country so as to highlight the ...

Read More

In response to two strong global vectors: the rise of pervasive information technologies and the privatization of the public sphere, Marc Böhlen and Hans Frei propose hybrid architectural programs called Micro Public Places (MMPs). MPPs combine insights from ambient intelligence, human computing, architecture, social engineering and urbanism to initiate ways to re- animate public life in contemporary societies. They offer access to things that are or should be available to all: air, water, medicine, books, etc. and combine machine learning procedures with subjective human intuition to make the public realm a contested space again.

Read More

On YouTube, the Jackson Hole traffic cam broadcasts a live view from a pizzeria at a mundane intersection in Wyoming. In this space of the live-streaming cam, nothing seems to actually happen, but in the flow of sameness, everything happens. Minor events become enormous. And for some reason, tens of thousands of people gather online to watch this particular cam together…

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2016
This conversation with Jessica Myers occurred in the context of her recording of a second season of the podcast “Here There Be Dragons” about the way city residents experience neighborhoods in various way. While the first season was dedicated to New York (in particular regarding gentrification), the second one will be about Paris and the notion of safety and identities. After Jessica interviewed me (absent here, but fragments will be part of this second season), she returned the favor and talked to me about this project and a few of the responses that she had collected through the 31 other ...

Read More

Whereas the concept of the public sphere was booming in the 1980s and 90s, now more and more it seems to be examined critically in discursive and political contexts, and at the same time, as a point of reference for emancipatory practices, it appears to have gone out of fashion. In the art field a growing trend to address partial public spheres / communities has become evident. Here the concept of “art for all” that was previously understood as an emancipatory concept is in danger of being overrun by customer-orientation and audience fetishism in a neo-liberal context. The current focus ...

Read More

PublisherSite Visit2017
Ashley and Erik visit Menards with Ellie Abrons, Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning and principal of the architecture firm T+E+A+M, with Thom Moran, Adam Fure and Meredith Miller. Prior to joining Taubman College, Ellie Abrons worked as a project designer in numerous offices such as servo, GregLynnFORM, and Office dA. Ellie is the recipient of residency fellowships at the Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart, Germany and The MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire. Her work has been exhibited at the Venice Biennale, Storefront for Art and Architecture, A+D Gallery, and the Architectural Association. T+E+A+M ...

Read More

PublisherSite Visit2018
On today’s Site Visit, we discuss our recent trip to Bounce Milwaukee, an indoor adventure playground that hosts a wide variety of activities including an inflatable sports arena, a laser tag course, a rock climbing wall and other attractions geared towards a broad audience of patrons. Located just off the city’s North-South freeway, Bounce Milwaukee is a destination for kids and adults alike, offering an exciting environment for birthday parties or rainy Saturdays complete with alcoholic beverages and snacks for adults. The character of Bounce Milwaukee speaks directly to Whitney’s passion for pneumatic architecture, the term used to describe membrane ...

Read More

PublisherLibrary Stack2018
A conversation between Library Stack and Léopold Lambert, a French publisher, editor, writer, theorist, podcaster and researcher working under the name The Funambulist. Lambert started The Funambulist as a blog, while working at an architecture firm, but its expanding publication activities over the past five years have turned it into his full time job. Lambert’s podcast series, and a few of his books, are archived in Library Stack’s database, and his diverse output has been inspiring. This conversation ranged across his work as a publisher, his practice as an experimental cartographer, and his current research into the spatial history of ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Liliana De Simone has for ambition to address the way architecture necessarily considers an idealized normalized body in order to conceive itself. Such a consideration almost always follows the dominant essentialization of bodies and this discussion addresses one in particular, gender. We first describe the canonical standardized bodies (often male) as defined by Le Corbusier, Neufert, and Dreyfuss. Then, we address more specifically the situation in South America (Colombia and Chile) and Liliana’s interest for urban policy making in this matter. We finish the conversation with the gender violence that resilience to catastrophes reasserts, in particular in the ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This podcast is the first one of a series of three recorded during a short residency at the Miami Rail. It addresses the on-going photographic series that artist Adler Guerrier constructs around the performativity of the flaneur. From the romantic figure described by Walter Benjamin in his writings about Charles Baudelaire, to its anti-capitalist offspring as defined by the Situationists, Adler explains how the action of flanerie (aimless walk) is a means to gather knowledge. He tells us how the body of the flaneur is a nameless solitary figure that the film noir’s amnesiac embodies the best, looking for markers ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Ann Laura Stoler and I begin this conversation by introducing the political context lexicon (see below) that she co-curates and edits. We then discuss the work she had done around the colonial management of sexuality and reproduction. The existence of the métis (mix-blooded) child in the colony renders more complex the binary distinction between colon citizens and colonial subjects. Biology is nevertheless not merely the only site of recognition for the colonial administration, behavior is also extremely important in the access to citizenship. We examine how space, whether corridor or school, is built to accommodate the administrated behavior of the colony. Finally, Ann gives us a ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2015
Throughout this conversation, we explore the multiple facets of Liam Young’s work for Tomorrow Thoughts Today (originally founded with Darryl Chen) and the Unknown Fields Division (with Kate Davies), his studio at the Architectural Association in London that took him to various expeditions around the world in order to document how our cities, in their infrastructure, extend far beyond their geographical limits and produce geological landscapes. As we discuss, the tentative does not consist in moralizing this production, but rather intervening within it as designers, often through (science) fiction that allows to problematize situations and to expand imaginaries. The last ...

Read More

PublisherThe Funambulist2016
From September 26 to December 15, 2014, tens of thousands of predominantly young Hong Kong residents occupied night and day the strategic sites of Admiralty (central business district on the North shore of the island) and Mong Kok (commercial core of Kowloon). These protests in the lineage of the revolutionary movements started in 2011 by what was commonly called the “Arab Spring,” then followed by various “occupations” in the Western World, occurred in opposition to the reform of the Hong Kong electoral system by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPCSC). This series of five episodes of conversations ...

Read More

Join Our Mailing List